schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Fate of Free Flap Microanastomosis Distal to the Zone of Injury in Lower Extremity Trauma

: The decision to perform free flap microanastomosis to clearly uninjured vessels proximal to the zone of injury for lower extremity reconstruction must be weighed against the anatomic and technical difficulties of performing such an anastomosis. Preserved blood flow through vessels traversing the z... Full description

Journal Title: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 1997, Vol.99(4), pp.1068-1073
Main Author: Kolker, R., Adam
Other Authors: Kasabian, K., Armen , Karp, S., Nolan , Gottlieb, J., Jacob
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Quelle: Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. All rights reserved.
ID: ISSN: 0032-1052
Link: http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=n&CSC=Y&PAGE=fulltext&D=ovft&AN=00006534-199704000-00022
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: ovid00006534-199704000-00022
title: Fate of Free Flap Microanastomosis Distal to the Zone of Injury in Lower Extremity Trauma
format: Article
creator:
  • Kolker, R., Adam
  • Kasabian, K., Armen
  • Karp, S., Nolan
  • Gottlieb, J., Jacob
ispartof: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 1997, Vol.99(4), pp.1068-1073
description: : The decision to perform free flap microanastomosis to clearly uninjured vessels proximal to the zone of injury for lower extremity reconstruction must be weighed against the anatomic and technical difficulties of performing such an anastomosis. Preserved blood flow through vessels traversing the zone of injury has been shown. The records of all patients who underwent lower extremity reconstruction with microvascular free flaps at NYU Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Center from January 1979 through August 1995 were reviewed. Patients with free flap microanastomoses distal to the zone of injury were compared with those with proximally based anastomoses. The group of patients was subdivided further into acute (1-21 days), subacute (22-60 days), and chronic (greater than 60 days) reconstruction groups. Of 451 microvascular free flaps, 35 were performed with recipient vessels distal to the zone of injury. Time interval from injury to coverage ranged from 24 hours to 57 years. Of 35 distally based flaps, 33 (94 percent) were successful and 5 required reoperation (14 percent). There was a similar incidence of thrombotic complications throughout all after-injury phases. Of 416 free flaps performed with microanastomoses to vessels proximal to the zone of injury, 388 (93 percent) were successful and 62 (15 percent) required reoperation. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in outcome between distal and proximal anastomoses and no significant difference (p > 0.05) in rates of reoperation. Timing of operation after injury had no bearing on outcome. Distally based microvascular free flaps anastomoses may be technically less difficult with rates of survival equal to those of proximally based flaps. The consideration and use of microanastomoses distal to the zone of injury are encouraged in selected patients.
language:
source: Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. All rights reserved.
identifier: ISSN: 0032-1052
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-1052
  • 00321052
url: Link


@attributes
ID234429047
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid00006534-199704000-00022
sourceidovid
recordidTN_ovid00006534-199704000-00022
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemOther
display
typearticle
titleFate of Free Flap Microanastomosis Distal to the Zone of Injury in Lower Extremity Trauma
creatorKolker, R., Adam ; Kasabian, K., Armen ; Karp, S., Nolan ; Gottlieb, J., Jacob
ispartofPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 1997, Vol.99(4), pp.1068-1073
identifierISSN: 0032-1052
description: The decision to perform free flap microanastomosis to clearly uninjured vessels proximal to the zone of injury for lower extremity reconstruction must be weighed against the anatomic and technical difficulties of performing such an anastomosis. Preserved blood flow through vessels traversing the zone of injury has been shown. The records of all patients who underwent lower extremity reconstruction with microvascular free flaps at NYU Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Center from January 1979 through August 1995 were reviewed. Patients with free flap microanastomoses distal to the zone of injury were compared with those with proximally based anastomoses. The group of patients was subdivided further into acute (1-21 days), subacute (22-60 days), and chronic (greater than 60 days) reconstruction groups. Of 451 microvascular free flaps, 35 were performed with recipient vessels distal to the zone of injury. Time interval from injury to coverage ranged from 24 hours to 57 years. Of 35 distally based flaps, 33 (94 percent) were successful and 5 required reoperation (14 percent). There was a similar incidence of thrombotic complications throughout all after-injury phases. Of 416 free flaps performed with microanastomoses to vessels proximal to the zone of injury, 388 (93 percent) were successful and 62 (15 percent) required reoperation. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in outcome between distal and proximal anastomoses and no significant difference (p > 0.05) in rates of reoperation. Timing of operation after injury had no bearing on outcome. Distally based microvascular free flaps anastomoses may be technically less difficult with rates of survival equal to those of proximally based flaps. The consideration and use of microanastomoses distal to the zone of injury are encouraged in selected patients.
sourceCopyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. All rights reserved.
version4
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=n&CSC=Y&PAGE=fulltext&D=ovft&AN=00006534-199704000-00022$$EView_record_at_Wolters_Kluwer_Health_Ovid_Technologies
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
addlink$$Uhttp://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/aboutOvid.html$$EView_Wolters_Kluwer_Health,_Lippincott,_Williams_&_Wilkins_Copyright_Statement
search
creatorcontrib
0Kolker, R, Adam
1Kasabian, K, Armen
2Karp, S, Nolan
3Gottlieb, J, Jacob
titleFate of Free Flap Microanastomosis Distal to the Zone of Injury in Lower Extremity Trauma
description: The decision to perform free flap microanastomosis to clearly uninjured vessels proximal to the zone of injury for lower extremity reconstruction must be weighed against the anatomic and technical difficulties of performing such an anastomosis. Preserved blood flow through vessels traversing the zone of injury has been shown. The records of all patients who underwent lower extremity reconstruction with microvascular free flaps at NYU Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Center from January 1979 through August 1995 were reviewed. Patients with free flap microanastomoses distal to the zone of injury were compared with those with proximally based anastomoses. The group of patients was subdivided further into acute (1-21 days), subacute (22-60 days), and chronic (greater than 60 days) reconstruction groups. Of 451 microvascular free flaps, 35 were performed with recipient vessels distal to the zone of injury. Time interval from injury to coverage ranged from 24 hours to 57 years. Of 35 distally based flaps, 33 (94 percent) were successful and 5 required reoperation (14 percent). There was a similar incidence of thrombotic complications throughout all after-injury phases. Of 416 free flaps performed with microanastomoses to vessels proximal to the zone of injury, 388 (93 percent) were successful and 62 (15 percent) required reoperation. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in outcome between distal and proximal anastomoses and no significant difference (p > 0.05) in rates of reoperation. Timing of operation after injury had no bearing on outcome. Distally based microvascular free flaps anastomoses may be technically less difficult with rates of survival equal to those of proximally based flaps. The consideration and use of microanastomoses distal to the zone of injury are encouraged in selected patients.
general
0©1997American Society of Plastic Surgeons
1Lippincott Williams & Wilkins - Journals
sourceidovid
recordidovid00006534-199704000-00022
issn
00032-1052
100321052
rsrctypearticle
creationdate1997
addtitlePlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
searchscopeovid
scopeovid
sort
titleFate of Free Flap Microanastomosis Distal to the Zone of Injury in Lower Extremity Trauma
authorKolker, R., Adam ; Kasabian, K., Armen ; Karp, S., Nolan ; Gottlieb, J., Jacob
creationdate19970400
facets
frbrgroupid6226643549246704890
frbrtype5
newrecords20190220
creationdate1997
collectionLippincott Williams & Wilkins Journals (Wolters Kluwer Health)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Kolker, R., Adam
1Kasabian, K., Armen
2Karp, S., Nolan
3Gottlieb, J., Jacob
jtitlePlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Kolker
1Kasabian
2Karp
3Gottlieb
aufirst
0Adam
1Armen
2Nolan
3Jacob
auinitm
0R.
1K.
2S.
3J.
au
0Kolker, R., Adam
1Kasabian, K., Armen
2Karp, S., Nolan
3Gottlieb, J., Jacob
atitleFate of Free Flap Microanastomosis Distal to the Zone of Injury in Lower Extremity Trauma
jtitlePlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
risdate199704
volume99
issue4
spage1068
epage1073
pages1068-1073
issn0032-1052
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstract: The decision to perform free flap microanastomosis to clearly uninjured vessels proximal to the zone of injury for lower extremity reconstruction must be weighed against the anatomic and technical difficulties of performing such an anastomosis. Preserved blood flow through vessels traversing the zone of injury has been shown. The records of all patients who underwent lower extremity reconstruction with microvascular free flaps at NYU Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Center from January 1979 through August 1995 were reviewed. Patients with free flap microanastomoses distal to the zone of injury were compared with those with proximally based anastomoses. The group of patients was subdivided further into acute (1-21 days), subacute (22-60 days), and chronic (greater than 60 days) reconstruction groups. Of 451 microvascular free flaps, 35 were performed with recipient vessels distal to the zone of injury. Time interval from injury to coverage ranged from 24 hours to 57 years. Of 35 distally based flaps, 33 (94 percent) were successful and 5 required reoperation (14 percent). There was a similar incidence of thrombotic complications throughout all after-injury phases. Of 416 free flaps performed with microanastomoses to vessels proximal to the zone of injury, 388 (93 percent) were successful and 62 (15 percent) required reoperation. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in outcome between distal and proximal anastomoses and no significant difference (p > 0.05) in rates of reoperation. Timing of operation after injury had no bearing on outcome. Distally based microvascular free flaps anastomoses may be technically less difficult with rates of survival equal to those of proximally based flaps. The consideration and use of microanastomoses distal to the zone of injury are encouraged in selected patients.
pub©1997American Society of Plastic Surgeons
date1997-04