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Trauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Predict Onset of Cardiovascular Events in Women

BACKGROUND—: Psychological stress is a proposed risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the sentinel stress-related mental disorder, occurs twice as frequently in women as men. However, whether PTSD contributes to CVD risk in women is not established.... Full description

Journal Title: Circulation 2015, Vol.132(4), pp.251-259
Main Author: Sumner, A., Jennifer
Other Authors: Kubzansky, D., Laura , Elkind, S.V., Mitchell , Roberts, L., Andrea , Agnew-Blais, M., Jessica , Chen, W., Qixuan , Cerdá, F., Magdalena , Rexrode, B., Kathryn , Rich-Edwards, C., Janet , Spiegelman, C., Donna , Suglia, C., Shakira , Rimm, C., Eric , Koenen, C., Karestan
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ID: ISSN: 0009-7322 ; DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.014492
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recordid: ovid10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.014492
title: Trauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Predict Onset of Cardiovascular Events in Women
format: Article
creator:
  • Sumner, A., Jennifer
  • Kubzansky, D., Laura
  • Elkind, S.V., Mitchell
  • Roberts, L., Andrea
  • Agnew-Blais, M., Jessica
  • Chen, W., Qixuan
  • Cerdá, F., Magdalena
  • Rexrode, B., Kathryn
  • Rich-Edwards, C., Janet
  • Spiegelman, C., Donna
  • Suglia, C., Shakira
  • Rimm, C., Eric
  • Koenen, C., Karestan
subjects:
  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Cardiovascular Symptoms
  • PTSD (DSM-IV)
  • Females
  • Americans
  • Adults
  • Nurses
  • Epidemiology
  • Predisposition
  • Nicotine Abuse
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Stressors
  • Survivors
  • Child Abuse
  • Child Sexual Abuse
  • Depressive Disorders
  • Brief Trauma Questionnaire (Schnurr et Al)
  • Seven-Symptom Screening Scale for PTSD (Breslau et Al)
ispartof: Circulation, 2015, Vol.132(4), pp.251-259
description: BACKGROUND—: Psychological stress is a proposed risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the sentinel stress-related mental disorder, occurs twice as frequently in women as men. However, whether PTSD contributes to CVD risk in women is not established. METHODS AND RESULTS—: We examined trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in relation to incident CVD over a 20-year period in 49 978 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for CVD events confirmed by additional information or medical record review (n=548, including myocardial infarction [n=277] and stroke [n=271]). Trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms were assessed by using the Brief Trauma Questionnaire and a PTSD screen. In comparison with no trauma exposure, endorsing ≥4 PTSD symptoms was associated with increased CVD risk after adjusting for age, family history, and childhood factors (hazard ratio,1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–2.13). Being trauma-exposed and endorsing no PTSD symptoms was associated with elevated CVD risk (hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.15–1.83), although being trauma-exposed and endorsing 1 to 3 PTSD symptoms was not. After adjusting for adult health behaviors and medical risk factors, this pattern of findings was maintained. Health behaviors and medical risk factors accounted for 14% of the trauma/no symptoms–CVD association and 47% of the trauma/4+ symptoms–CVD association. CONCLUSION—: Trauma exposure and elevated PTSD symptoms may increase the risk of CVD in this population of women. These findings suggest that screening for CVD risk and reducing health risk behaviors in trauma-exposed women may be promising avenues for prevention and intervention.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0009-7322 ; DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.014492
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0009-7322
  • 00097322
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titleTrauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Predict Onset of Cardiovascular Events in Women
creatorSumner, A., Jennifer ; Kubzansky, D., Laura ; Elkind, S.V., Mitchell ; Roberts, L., Andrea ; Agnew-Blais, M., Jessica ; Chen, W., Qixuan ; Cerdá, F., Magdalena ; Rexrode, B., Kathryn ; Rich-Edwards, C., Janet ; Spiegelman, C., Donna ; Suglia, C., Shakira ; Rimm, C., Eric ; Koenen, C., Karestan
ispartofCirculation, 2015, Vol.132(4), pp.251-259
identifierISSN: 0009-7322 ; DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.014492
descriptionBACKGROUND—: Psychological stress is a proposed risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the sentinel stress-related mental disorder, occurs twice as frequently in women as men. However, whether PTSD contributes to CVD risk in women is not established. METHODS AND RESULTS—: We examined trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in relation to incident CVD over a 20-year period in 49 978 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for CVD events confirmed by additional information or medical record review (n=548, including myocardial infarction [n=277] and stroke [n=271]). Trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms were assessed by using the Brief Trauma Questionnaire and a PTSD screen. In comparison with no trauma exposure, endorsing ≥4 PTSD symptoms was associated with increased CVD risk after adjusting for age, family history, and childhood factors (hazard ratio,1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–2.13). Being trauma-exposed and endorsing no PTSD symptoms was associated with elevated CVD risk (hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.15–1.83), although being trauma-exposed and endorsing 1 to 3 PTSD symptoms was not. After adjusting for adult health behaviors and medical risk factors, this pattern of findings was maintained. Health behaviors and medical risk factors accounted for 14% of the trauma/no symptoms–CVD association and 47% of the trauma/4+ symptoms–CVD association. CONCLUSION—: Trauma exposure and elevated PTSD symptoms may increase the risk of CVD in this population of women. These findings suggest that screening for CVD risk and reducing health risk behaviors in trauma-exposed women may be promising avenues for prevention and intervention.
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subjectCardiovascular Diseases ; Cardiovascular Symptoms ; PTSD (DSM-IV) ; Females ; Americans ; Adults ; Nurses ; Epidemiology ; Predisposition ; Nicotine Abuse ; Alcohol Abuse ; Stressors ; Survivors ; Child Abuse ; Child Sexual Abuse ; Depressive Disorders ; Brief Trauma Questionnaire (Schnurr et Al) ; Seven-Symptom Screening Scale for PTSD (Breslau et Al);
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7Rexrode, B, Kathryn
8Rich-Edwards, C, Janet
9Spiegelman, C, Donna
10Suglia, C, Shakira
11Rimm, C, Eric
12Koenen, C, Karestan
titleTrauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Predict Onset of Cardiovascular Events in Women
descriptionBACKGROUND—: Psychological stress is a proposed risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the sentinel stress-related mental disorder, occurs twice as frequently in women as men. However, whether PTSD contributes to CVD risk in women is not established. METHODS AND RESULTS—: We examined trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in relation to incident CVD over a 20-year period in 49 978 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for CVD events confirmed by additional information or medical record review (n=548, including myocardial infarction [n=277] and stroke [n=271]). Trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms were assessed by using the Brief Trauma Questionnaire and a PTSD screen. In comparison with no trauma exposure, endorsing ≥4 PTSD symptoms was associated with increased CVD risk after adjusting for age, family history, and childhood factors (hazard ratio,1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–2.13). Being trauma-exposed and endorsing no PTSD symptoms was associated with elevated CVD risk (hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.15–1.83), although being trauma-exposed and endorsing 1 to 3 PTSD symptoms was not. After adjusting for adult health behaviors and medical risk factors, this pattern of findings was maintained. Health behaviors and medical risk factors accounted for 14% of the trauma/no symptoms–CVD association and 47% of the trauma/4+ symptoms–CVD association. CONCLUSION—: Trauma exposure and elevated PTSD symptoms may increase the risk of CVD in this population of women. These findings suggest that screening for CVD risk and reducing health risk behaviors in trauma-exposed women may be promising avenues for prevention and intervention.
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1© 2015 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association, Inc.
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authorSumner, A., Jennifer ; Kubzansky, D., Laura ; Elkind, S.V., Mitchell ; Roberts, L., Andrea ; Agnew-Blais, M., Jessica ; Chen, W., Qixuan ; Cerdá, F., Magdalena ; Rexrode, B., Kathryn ; Rich-Edwards, C., Janet ; Spiegelman, C., Donna ; Suglia, C., Shakira ; Rimm, C., Eric ; Koenen, C., Karestan
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abstractBACKGROUND—: Psychological stress is a proposed risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the sentinel stress-related mental disorder, occurs twice as frequently in women as men. However, whether PTSD contributes to CVD risk in women is not established. METHODS AND RESULTS—: We examined trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in relation to incident CVD over a 20-year period in 49 978 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for CVD events confirmed by additional information or medical record review (n=548, including myocardial infarction [n=277] and stroke [n=271]). Trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms were assessed by using the Brief Trauma Questionnaire and a PTSD screen. In comparison with no trauma exposure, endorsing ≥4 PTSD symptoms was associated with increased CVD risk after adjusting for age, family history, and childhood factors (hazard ratio,1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–2.13). Being trauma-exposed and endorsing no PTSD symptoms was associated with elevated CVD risk (hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.15–1.83), although being trauma-exposed and endorsing 1 to 3 PTSD symptoms was not. After adjusting for adult health behaviors and medical risk factors, this pattern of findings was maintained. Health behaviors and medical risk factors accounted for 14% of the trauma/no symptoms–CVD association and 47% of the trauma/4+ symptoms–CVD association. CONCLUSION—: Trauma exposure and elevated PTSD symptoms may increase the risk of CVD in this population of women. These findings suggest that screening for CVD risk and reducing health risk behaviors in trauma-exposed women may be promising avenues for prevention and intervention.
pub© 2015 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association, Inc.
doi10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.014492
eissn15244539
date2015-07-28