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Prevalences of illicit drug use in people aged 50 years and over from two surveys

Background: little is known about illicit drug use in older people. Prevalences may rise as populations for whom illicit drug use has been more common and acceptable become older. to quantify illicit drug use in people aged 50 years and over in England and inner London and to compare this between 50... Full description

Journal Title: Age and Ageing 2012, Vol. 41(4), pp.553-556
Main Author: Fahmy, Viola
Other Authors: Hatch, Stephani L , Hotopf, Matthew , Stewart, Robert
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0002-0729 ; E-ISSN: 1468-2834 ; DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afs020
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recordid: oxford10.1093/ageing/afs020
title: Prevalences of illicit drug use in people aged 50 years and over from two surveys
format: Article
creator:
  • Fahmy, Viola
  • Hatch, Stephani L
  • Hotopf, Matthew
  • Stewart, Robert
subjects:
  • Substance Use
  • Aged
  • Survey
  • Cannabis
  • Amphetamine
  • Elderly
ispartof: Age and Ageing, 2012, Vol. 41(4), pp.553-556
description: Background: little is known about illicit drug use in older people. Prevalences may rise as populations for whom illicit drug use has been more common and acceptable become older. to quantify illicit drug use in people aged 50 years and over in England and inner London and to compare this between 50 and 64 and 65+ age groups. primary analyses used data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) and the 2008–10 South East London Community Health (SELCoH) Survey. Secondary analyses included additional data on 50–64 year olds from the 1993, 2000 and 2007 APMS, and on 65–74 year olds from the 2000 and 2007 APMS. cannabis was the drug most commonly used in all samples. Prevalences of use within the last 12 months in 50–64 and 65+ age groups were 1.8 and 0.4%, respectively, in England and 9.0 and 1.1%, respectively, in inner London. Prevalences of use at any time previously were 11.4, 1.7, 42.8 and 9.4%, respectively. Lifetime cannabis, amphetamine, cocaine and LSD use in 50–64 year olds had increased approximately tenfold in England from 1993. Lifetime and 12-month trends in tranquilisers were relatively stable. use of some illicit drugs, particularly cannabis, has increased rapidly in mid- and late-life.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-0729 ; E-ISSN: 1468-2834 ; DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afs020
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-0729
  • 00020729
  • 1468-2834
  • 14682834
url: Link


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titlePrevalences of illicit drug use in people aged 50 years and over from two surveys
creatorFahmy, Viola ; Hatch, Stephani L ; Hotopf, Matthew ; Stewart, Robert
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subjectSubstance Use ; Aged ; Survey ; Cannabis ; Amphetamine ; Elderly
descriptionBackground: little is known about illicit drug use in older people. Prevalences may rise as populations for whom illicit drug use has been more common and acceptable become older. to quantify illicit drug use in people aged 50 years and over in England and inner London and to compare this between 50 and 64 and 65+ age groups. primary analyses used data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) and the 2008–10 South East London Community Health (SELCoH) Survey. Secondary analyses included additional data on 50–64 year olds from the 1993, 2000 and 2007 APMS, and on 65–74 year olds from the 2000 and 2007 APMS. cannabis was the drug most commonly used in all samples. Prevalences of use within the last 12 months in 50–64 and 65+ age groups were 1.8 and 0.4%, respectively, in England and 9.0 and 1.1%, respectively, in inner London. Prevalences of use at any time previously were 11.4, 1.7, 42.8 and 9.4%, respectively. Lifetime cannabis, amphetamine, cocaine and LSD use in 50–64 year olds had increased approximately tenfold in England from 1993. Lifetime and 12-month trends in tranquilisers were relatively stable. use of some illicit drugs, particularly cannabis, has increased rapidly in mid- and late-life.
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titlePrevalences of illicit drug use in people aged 50 years and over from two surveys
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0Background: little is known about illicit drug use in older people. Prevalences may rise as populations for whom illicit drug use has been more common and acceptable become older.
1to quantify illicit drug use in people aged 50 years and over in England and inner London and to compare this between 50 and 64 and 65+ age groups.
2primary analyses used data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) and the 2008–10 South East London Community Health (SELCoH) Survey. Secondary analyses included additional data on 50–64 year olds from the 1993, 2000 and 2007 APMS, and on 65–74 year olds from the 2000 and 2007 APMS.
3cannabis was the drug most commonly used in all samples. Prevalences of use within the last 12 months in 50–64 and 65+ age groups were 1.8 and 0.4%, respectively, in England and 9.0 and 1.1%, respectively, in inner London. Prevalences of use at any time previously were 11.4, 1.7, 42.8 and 9.4%, respectively. Lifetime cannabis, amphetamine, cocaine and LSD use in 50–64 year olds had increased approximately tenfold in England from 1993. Lifetime and 12-month trends in tranquilisers were relatively stable.
4use of some illicit drugs, particularly cannabis, has increased rapidly in mid- and late-life.
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abstractBackground: little is known about illicit drug use in older people. Prevalences may rise as populations for whom illicit drug use has been more common and acceptable become older. to quantify illicit drug use in people aged 50 years and over in England and inner London and to compare this between 50 and 64 and 65+ age groups. primary analyses used data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) and the 2008–10 South East London Community Health (SELCoH) Survey. Secondary analyses included additional data on 50–64 year olds from the 1993, 2000 and 2007 APMS, and on 65–74 year olds from the 2000 and 2007 APMS. cannabis was the drug most commonly used in all samples. Prevalences of use within the last 12 months in 50–64 and 65+ age groups were 1.8 and 0.4%, respectively, in England and 9.0 and 1.1%, respectively, in inner London. Prevalences of use at any time previously were 11.4, 1.7, 42.8 and 9.4%, respectively. Lifetime cannabis, amphetamine, cocaine and LSD use in 50–64 year olds had increased approximately tenfold in England from 1993. Lifetime and 12-month trends in tranquilisers were relatively stable. use of some illicit drugs, particularly cannabis, has increased rapidly in mid- and late-life.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.1093/ageing/afs020
date2012-07