schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

The Joint Association of Eating Frequency and Diet Quality With Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study

The results of most case-control studies have suggested a positive association between eating frequency and colorectal cancer risk. Because no prospective cohort studies have done so to date, the authors prospectively examined this association. In 1992, eating frequency was assessed in a cohort of 3... Full description

Journal Title: American Journal of Epidemiology 2012, Vol. 175(7), pp.664-672
Main Author: Mekary, Rania A
Other Authors: Hu, Frank B , Willett, Walter C , Chiuve, Stephanie , Wu, Kana , Fuchs, Charles , Fung, Teresa T , Giovannucci, Edward
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0002-9262 ; E-ISSN: 1476-6256 ; DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwr363
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: oxford10.1093/aje/kwr363
title: The Joint Association of Eating Frequency and Diet Quality With Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study
format: Article
creator:
  • Mekary, Rania A
  • Hu, Frank B
  • Willett, Walter C
  • Chiuve, Stephanie
  • Wu, Kana
  • Fuchs, Charles
  • Fung, Teresa T
  • Giovannucci, Edward
subjects:
  • Colorectal Neoplasms
  • Diet
  • Food
  • Nutritional Status
ispartof: American Journal of Epidemiology, 2012, Vol. 175(7), pp.664-672
description: The results of most case-control studies have suggested a positive association between eating frequency and colorectal cancer risk. Because no prospective cohort studies have done so to date, the authors prospectively examined this association. In 1992, eating frequency was assessed in a cohort of 34,968 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for various levels of eating frequency. Effect modifications by overall dietary quality (assessed using the Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension score) and by factors that influence insulin resistance were further assessed. Between 1992 and 2006, a total of 583 cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed. When comparing the highest eating frequency category (5–8 times/day) with the reference category (3 times/day), the authors found no evidence of an increased risk of colorectal cancer (multivariate relative risk = 0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.26) or colon cancer (multivariate relative risk = 0.78, 95% confidence interval: 0.49, 1.25). There was an implied inverse association with eating frequency among participants who had healthier diets (high Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension score; P for interaction = 0.01), especially among men in the high-insulin-sensitivity group (body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m) 2 )
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-9262 ; E-ISSN: 1476-6256 ; DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwr363
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-9262
  • 00029262
  • 1476-6256
  • 14766256
url: Link


@attributes
ID1050774844
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1093/aje/kwr363
sourceidoxford
recordidTN_oxford10.1093/aje/kwr363
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemOther
pqid993910682
galeid299912280
display
typearticle
titleThe Joint Association of Eating Frequency and Diet Quality With Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study
creatorMekary, Rania A ; Hu, Frank B ; Willett, Walter C ; Chiuve, Stephanie ; Wu, Kana ; Fuchs, Charles ; Fung, Teresa T ; Giovannucci, Edward
ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiology, 2012, Vol. 175(7), pp.664-672
identifier
subjectColorectal Neoplasms ; Diet ; Food ; Nutritional Status
descriptionThe results of most case-control studies have suggested a positive association between eating frequency and colorectal cancer risk. Because no prospective cohort studies have done so to date, the authors prospectively examined this association. In 1992, eating frequency was assessed in a cohort of 34,968 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for various levels of eating frequency. Effect modifications by overall dietary quality (assessed using the Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension score) and by factors that influence insulin resistance were further assessed. Between 1992 and 2006, a total of 583 cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed. When comparing the highest eating frequency category (5–8 times/day) with the reference category (3 times/day), the authors found no evidence of an increased risk of colorectal cancer (multivariate relative risk = 0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.26) or colon cancer (multivariate relative risk = 0.78, 95% confidence interval: 0.49, 1.25). There was an implied inverse association with eating frequency among participants who had healthier diets (high Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension score; P for interaction = 0.01), especially among men in the high-insulin-sensitivity group (body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m) 2 ) <25, ≥2 cups of coffee/day, and more physical activity; P for interaction < 0.01, P for trend = 0.01). There was an implied protective association between increased eating frequency of healthy meals and colorectal cancer risk and in men with factors associated with higher insulin sensitivity.
source
version8
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Mekary, Rania A
1Hu, Frank B
2Willett, Walter C
3Chiuve, Stephanie
4Wu, Kana
5Fuchs, Charles
6Fung, Teresa T
7Giovannucci, Edward
titleThe Joint Association of Eating Frequency and Diet Quality With Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study
descriptionThe results of most case-control studies have suggested a positive association between eating frequency and colorectal cancer risk. Because no prospective cohort studies have done so to date, the authors prospectively examined this association. In 1992, eating frequency was assessed in a cohort of 34,968 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for various levels of eating frequency. Effect modifications by overall dietary quality (assessed using the Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension score) and by factors that influence insulin resistance were further assessed. Between 1992 and 2006, a total of 583 cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed. When comparing the highest eating frequency category (5–8 times/day) with the reference category (3 times/day), the authors found no evidence of an increased risk of colorectal cancer (multivariate relative risk = 0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.26) or colon cancer (multivariate relative risk = 0.78, 95% confidence interval: 0.49, 1.25). There was an implied inverse association with eating frequency among participants who had healthier diets (high Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension score; P for interaction = 0.01), especially among men in the high-insulin-sensitivity group (body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m) 2 ) <25, ≥2 cups of coffee/day, and more physical activity; P for interaction < 0.01, P for trend = 0.01). There was an implied protective association between increased eating frequency of healthy meals and colorectal cancer risk and in men with factors associated with higher insulin sensitivity.
subject
0colorectal neoplasms
1diet
2food
3nutritional status
general
010.1093/aje/kwr363
1Oxford Journals
sourceidoxford
recordidoxford10.1093/aje/kwr363
issn
00002-9262
100029262
21476-6256
314766256
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2012
addtitleAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
searchscopeoxford
scopeoxford
lsr40201201
lsr41201202
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[date, pqid, galeid]
sort
titleThe Joint Association of Eating Frequency and Diet Quality With Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study
authorMekary, Rania A ; Hu, Frank B ; Willett, Walter C ; Chiuve, Stephanie ; Wu, Kana ; Fuchs, Charles ; Fung, Teresa T ; Giovannucci, Edward
creationdate20120000
facets
frbrgroupid7668365043902250260
frbrtype5
creationdate2012
topic
0Colorectal Neoplasms
1Diet
2Food
3Nutritional Status
collectionOxford Journals (Oxford University Press)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Mekary, Rania A
1Hu, Frank B
2Willett, Walter C
3Chiuve, Stephanie
4Wu, Kana
5Fuchs, Charles
6Fung, Teresa T
7Giovannucci, Edward
jtitleAmerican Journal Of Epidemiology
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Mekary
1Hu
2Willett
3Chiuve
4Wu
5Fuchs
6Fung
7Giovannucci
aufirst
0Rania A.
1Frank B.
2Walter C.
3Stephanie
4Kana
5Charles
6Teresa T.
7Edward
au
0Mekary, Rania A.
1Hu, Frank B.
2Willett, Walter C.
3Chiuve, Stephanie
4Wu, Kana
5Fuchs, Charles
6Fung, Teresa T.
7Giovannucci, Edward
atitleThe Joint Association of Eating Frequency and Diet Quality With Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study
jtitleAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
risdate2012
volume175
issue7
spage664
epage672
pages664-672
issn0002-9262
eissn1476-6256
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractThe results of most case-control studies have suggested a positive association between eating frequency and colorectal cancer risk. Because no prospective cohort studies have done so to date, the authors prospectively examined this association. In 1992, eating frequency was assessed in a cohort of 34,968 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for various levels of eating frequency. Effect modifications by overall dietary quality (assessed using the Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension score) and by factors that influence insulin resistance were further assessed. Between 1992 and 2006, a total of 583 cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed. When comparing the highest eating frequency category (5–8 times/day) with the reference category (3 times/day), the authors found no evidence of an increased risk of colorectal cancer (multivariate relative risk = 0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.26) or colon cancer (multivariate relative risk = 0.78, 95% confidence interval: 0.49, 1.25). There was an implied inverse association with eating frequency among participants who had healthier diets (high Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension score; P for interaction = 0.01), especially among men in the high-insulin-sensitivity group (body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m) 2 ) <25, ≥2 cups of coffee/day, and more physical activity; P for interaction < 0.01, P for trend = 0.01). There was an implied protective association between increased eating frequency of healthy meals and colorectal cancer risk and in men with factors associated with higher insulin sensitivity.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.1093/aje/kwr363
date2012-04-01