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Statin use linked with a decrease in the conversion from high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) to prostate cancer

In a prospective study of HGPIN patients, statin use reduced PC risk during follow-up. HGPIN is a premalignant biomarker of PC, and these results suggest that statins affect the hyperplasia or dysplasia phases of prostate carcinogenesis. The roles of obesity, metabolic dysregulation and systemic inf... Full description

Journal Title: Carcinogenesis 2018, Vol. 39(6), pp.819-825
Main Author: Fowke, Jay H
Other Authors: Motley, Saundra S
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0143-3334 ; E-ISSN: 1460-2180 ; DOI: 10.1093/carcin/bgy050
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recordid: oxford10.1093/carcin/bgy050
title: Statin use linked with a decrease in the conversion from high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) to prostate cancer
format: Article
creator:
  • Fowke, Jay H
  • Motley, Saundra S
subjects:
  • Medicine
ispartof: Carcinogenesis, 2018, Vol. 39(6), pp.819-825
description: In a prospective study of HGPIN patients, statin use reduced PC risk during follow-up. HGPIN is a premalignant biomarker of PC, and these results suggest that statins affect the hyperplasia or dysplasia phases of prostate carcinogenesis. The roles of obesity, metabolic dysregulation and systemic inflammation to advance prostate carcinogenesis are unclear. This study investigates metabolic and inflammatory factors in the transition from high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) to prostate cancer (PC). We prospectively followed 160 men diagnosed with HGPIN at biopsy and therefore at high-risk and clinically monitored for PC. Analyses investigated body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist–hip ratio (WHR), height, fat mass, lean mass percent body fat, NSAIDs, statins, metformin, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia representing metabolic dysregulation on the risk of a PC diagnosis during follow-up. Systemic inflammation was estimated through measurement of 13 plasma cytokine levels. Statin use was significantly linked with overall PC at follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 0.45, (0.23, 0.91), P = 0.03], with a somewhat stronger link with high-grade [OR = 0.39, (0.15, 1.04), P = 0.06] PC compared with low-grade PC [OR = 0.50, (0.23, 1.12), P = 0.09]. Non-statin cholesterol-lowering medications, BMI, WHR, diabetes, hypertension and percent body fat were not significantly associated with PC. Although blood IL-12p70, IL-2 and IL-1β levels were significantly lower among statin users, inflammatory markers were not significantly linked with PC and did not explain the observed relationship between statins and lower PC risk. In summary, this prospective study of HGPIN patients at high risk for PC finds that statin use was significantly associated with reduced risk of PC detection at follow-up. Systemic markers of inflammation did not mediate this association, suggesting that statins affect PC progression through alternative pathways.
language:
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identifier: ISSN: 0143-3334 ; E-ISSN: 1460-2180 ; DOI: 10.1093/carcin/bgy050
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0143-3334
  • 01433334
  • 1460-2180
  • 14602180
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titleStatin use linked with a decrease in the conversion from high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) to prostate cancer
creatorFowke, Jay H ; Motley, Saundra S
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descriptionIn a prospective study of HGPIN patients, statin use reduced PC risk during follow-up. HGPIN is a premalignant biomarker of PC, and these results suggest that statins affect the hyperplasia or dysplasia phases of prostate carcinogenesis. The roles of obesity, metabolic dysregulation and systemic inflammation to advance prostate carcinogenesis are unclear. This study investigates metabolic and inflammatory factors in the transition from high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) to prostate cancer (PC). We prospectively followed 160 men diagnosed with HGPIN at biopsy and therefore at high-risk and clinically monitored for PC. Analyses investigated body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist–hip ratio (WHR), height, fat mass, lean mass percent body fat, NSAIDs, statins, metformin, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia representing metabolic dysregulation on the risk of a PC diagnosis during follow-up. Systemic inflammation was estimated through measurement of 13 plasma cytokine levels. Statin use was significantly linked with overall PC at follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 0.45, (0.23, 0.91), P = 0.03], with a somewhat stronger link with high-grade [OR = 0.39, (0.15, 1.04), P = 0.06] PC compared with low-grade PC [OR = 0.50, (0.23, 1.12), P = 0.09]. Non-statin cholesterol-lowering medications, BMI, WHR, diabetes, hypertension and percent body fat were not significantly associated with PC. Although blood IL-12p70, IL-2 and IL-1β levels were significantly lower among statin users, inflammatory markers were not significantly linked with PC and did not explain the observed relationship between statins and lower PC risk. In summary, this prospective study of HGPIN patients at high risk for PC finds that statin use was significantly associated with reduced risk of PC detection at follow-up. Systemic markers of inflammation did not mediate this association, suggesting that statins affect PC progression through alternative pathways.
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abstractIn a prospective study of HGPIN patients, statin use reduced PC risk during follow-up. HGPIN is a premalignant biomarker of PC, and these results suggest that statins affect the hyperplasia or dysplasia phases of prostate carcinogenesis. The roles of obesity, metabolic dysregulation and systemic inflammation to advance prostate carcinogenesis are unclear. This study investigates metabolic and inflammatory factors in the transition from high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) to prostate cancer (PC). We prospectively followed 160 men diagnosed with HGPIN at biopsy and therefore at high-risk and clinically monitored for PC. Analyses investigated body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist–hip ratio (WHR), height, fat mass, lean mass percent body fat, NSAIDs, statins, metformin, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia representing metabolic dysregulation on the risk of a PC diagnosis during follow-up. Systemic inflammation was estimated through measurement of 13 plasma cytokine levels. Statin use was significantly linked with overall PC at follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 0.45, (0.23, 0.91), P = 0.03], with a somewhat stronger link with high-grade [OR = 0.39, (0.15, 1.04), P = 0.06] PC compared with low-grade PC [OR = 0.50, (0.23, 1.12), P = 0.09]. Non-statin cholesterol-lowering medications, BMI, WHR, diabetes, hypertension and percent body fat were not significantly associated with PC. Although blood IL-12p70, IL-2 and IL-1β levels were significantly lower among statin users, inflammatory markers were not significantly linked with PC and did not explain the observed relationship between statins and lower PC risk. In summary, this prospective study of HGPIN patients at high risk for PC finds that statin use was significantly associated with reduced risk of PC detection at follow-up. Systemic markers of inflammation did not mediate this association, suggesting that statins affect PC progression through alternative pathways.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.1093/carcin/bgy050
date2018-05-28