schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Dissociated Pathways for Successful Memory Retrieval from the Human Parietal Cortex: Anatomical and Functional Connectivity Analyses

The parietal cortex has traditionally been implicated in spatial attention and eye-movement processes. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have found that activation in the parietal cortex is related to successful recognition memory. The activated regions consistently include the intraparietal su... Full description

Journal Title: Cerebral Cortex 2008, 2007, Vol. 18(8), pp.1771-1778
Main Author: Takahashi, Emi
Other Authors: Ohki, Kenichi , Kim, Dae - Shik
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1047-3211 ; E-ISSN: 1460-2199 ; DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhm204
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: oxford10.1093/cercor/bhm204
title: Dissociated Pathways for Successful Memory Retrieval from the Human Parietal Cortex: Anatomical and Functional Connectivity Analyses
format: Article
creator:
  • Takahashi, Emi
  • Ohki, Kenichi
  • Kim, Dae - Shik
subjects:
  • Diffusion Tensor Imaging
  • Functional Connectivity
  • Long - Term Memory
  • Parietal Cortex
  • Temporal Lobe
ispartof: Cerebral Cortex, 2008, 2007, Vol. 18(8), pp.1771-1778
description: The parietal cortex has traditionally been implicated in spatial attention and eye-movement processes. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have found that activation in the parietal cortex is related to successful recognition memory. The activated regions consistently include the intraparietal sulcus in the lateral parietal cortex and the precuneus in the medial parietal cortex. However, little is known about the functional differences between lateral and medial parietal cortices in the memory retrieval process. In this study, we examined whether the human lateral and medial parietal lobes have differential anatomical and functional connectivity with the temporal lobe. To this end, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to constrain the analysis of anatomical connectivity obtained by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Both DTI tractography and functional connectivity analysis showed that the lateral parietal region has anatomical and functional connections with the lateral temporal lobe, and the medial parietal region has connections with the medial temporal lobe. These results suggest the existence of segregated lateral and medial parieto-temporal pathways in successful memory retrieval.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1047-3211 ; E-ISSN: 1460-2199 ; DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhm204
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1047-3211
  • 10473211
  • 1460-2199
  • 14602199
url: Link


@attributes
ID1641644888
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1093/cercor/bhm204
sourceidoxford
recordidTN_oxford10.1093/cercor/bhm204
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
pqid198741847
display
typearticle
titleDissociated Pathways for Successful Memory Retrieval from the Human Parietal Cortex: Anatomical and Functional Connectivity Analyses
creatorTakahashi, Emi ; Ohki, Kenichi ; Kim, Dae - Shik
ispartofCerebral Cortex, 2008, 2007, Vol. 18(8), pp.1771-1778
identifier
subjectDiffusion Tensor Imaging ; Functional Connectivity ; Long - Term Memory ; Parietal Cortex ; Temporal Lobe
descriptionThe parietal cortex has traditionally been implicated in spatial attention and eye-movement processes. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have found that activation in the parietal cortex is related to successful recognition memory. The activated regions consistently include the intraparietal sulcus in the lateral parietal cortex and the precuneus in the medial parietal cortex. However, little is known about the functional differences between lateral and medial parietal cortices in the memory retrieval process. In this study, we examined whether the human lateral and medial parietal lobes have differential anatomical and functional connectivity with the temporal lobe. To this end, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to constrain the analysis of anatomical connectivity obtained by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Both DTI tractography and functional connectivity analysis showed that the lateral parietal region has anatomical and functional connections with the lateral temporal lobe, and the medial parietal region has connections with the medial temporal lobe. These results suggest the existence of segregated lateral and medial parieto-temporal pathways in successful memory retrieval.
source
version6
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Takahashi, Emi
1Ohki, Kenichi
2Kim, Dae-Shik
titleDissociated Pathways for Successful Memory Retrieval from the Human Parietal Cortex: Anatomical and Functional Connectivity Analyses
descriptionThe parietal cortex has traditionally been implicated in spatial attention and eye-movement processes. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have found that activation in the parietal cortex is related to successful recognition memory. The activated regions consistently include the intraparietal sulcus in the lateral parietal cortex and the precuneus in the medial parietal cortex. However, little is known about the functional differences between lateral and medial parietal cortices in the memory retrieval process. In this study, we examined whether the human lateral and medial parietal lobes have differential anatomical and functional connectivity with the temporal lobe. To this end, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to constrain the analysis of anatomical connectivity obtained by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Both DTI tractography and functional connectivity analysis showed that the lateral parietal region has anatomical and functional connections with the lateral temporal lobe, and the medial parietal region has connections with the medial temporal lobe. These results suggest the existence of segregated lateral and medial parieto-temporal pathways in successful memory retrieval.
subject
0diffusion tensor imaging
1functional connectivity
2long-term memory
3parietal cortex
4temporal lobe
general
010.1093/cercor/bhm204
1Oxford Journals
sourceidoxford
recordidoxford10.1093/cercor/bhm204
issn
01047-3211
110473211
21460-2199
314602199
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2007
addtitleCerebral Cortex
searchscopeoxford
scopeoxford
lsr4120071228
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid]
sort
titleDissociated Pathways for Successful Memory Retrieval from the Human Parietal Cortex: Anatomical and Functional Connectivity Analyses
authorTakahashi, Emi ; Ohki, Kenichi ; Kim, Dae - Shik
creationdate200808
facets
frbrgroupid6201876958574779973
frbrtype5
creationdate2007
topic
0Diffusion Tensor Imaging
1Functional Connectivity
2Long - Term Memory
3Parietal Cortex
4Temporal Lobe
collectionOxford Journals (Oxford University Press)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Takahashi, Emi
1Ohki, Kenichi
2Kim, Dae - Shik
jtitleCerebral Cortex
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Takahashi
1Ohki
2Kim
aufirst
0Emi
1Kenichi
2Dae-Shik
au
0Takahashi, Emi
1Ohki, Kenichi
2Kim, Dae-Shik
atitleDissociated Pathways for Successful Memory Retrieval from the Human Parietal Cortex: Anatomical and Functional Connectivity Analyses
jtitleCerebral Cortex
date
0200808
120071228
risdate200808
volume18
issue8
spage1771
epage1778
pages1771-1778
issn1047-3211
eissn1460-2199
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractThe parietal cortex has traditionally been implicated in spatial attention and eye-movement processes. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have found that activation in the parietal cortex is related to successful recognition memory. The activated regions consistently include the intraparietal sulcus in the lateral parietal cortex and the precuneus in the medial parietal cortex. However, little is known about the functional differences between lateral and medial parietal cortices in the memory retrieval process. In this study, we examined whether the human lateral and medial parietal lobes have differential anatomical and functional connectivity with the temporal lobe. To this end, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to constrain the analysis of anatomical connectivity obtained by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Both DTI tractography and functional connectivity analysis showed that the lateral parietal region has anatomical and functional connections with the lateral temporal lobe, and the medial parietal region has connections with the medial temporal lobe. These results suggest the existence of segregated lateral and medial parieto-temporal pathways in successful memory retrieval.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.1093/cercor/bhm204