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An important role of the pepper phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene ( PAL1 ) in salicylic acid-dependent signalling of the defence response to microbial pathogens

Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is an inducible enzyme that responds to biotic and abiotic stresses. Results suggest the potential significance of pepper PAL1 in the plant defence response to microbial pathogens. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) has a crucial role in secondary phenylpropanoid met... Full description

Journal Title: Journal Of Experimental Botany 2014, Vol. 65(9), pp.2295-2306
Main Author: Kim, Dae Sung
Other Authors: Hwang, Byung Kook
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0022-0957 ; E-ISSN: 1460-2431 ; DOI: 10.1093/jxb/eru109
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recordid: oxford10.1093/jxb/eru109
title: An important role of the pepper phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene ( PAL1 ) in salicylic acid-dependent signalling of the defence response to microbial pathogens
format: Article
creator:
  • Kim, Dae Sung
  • Hwang, Byung Kook
subjects:
  • Arabidopsis
  • Defence
  • Pepper
  • Phenylalanine Ammonia - Lyase
  • Pv. .
ispartof: Journal Of Experimental Botany, 2014, Vol. 65(9), pp.2295-2306
description: Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is an inducible enzyme that responds to biotic and abiotic stresses. Results suggest the potential significance of pepper PAL1 in the plant defence response to microbial pathogens. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) has a crucial role in secondary phenylpropanoid metabolism and is one of the most extensively studied enzymes with respect to plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Here, we identified the pepper ( Capsicum annuum ) PAL ( CaPAL1 ) gene, which was induced in pepper leaves by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria ( Xcv ) infection. CaPAL1 -silenced pepper plants exhibited increased susceptibility to virulent and avirulent Xcv infection. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypersensitive cell death, expression of the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent marker gene CaPR1 , SA accumulation, and induction of PAL activity were significantly compromised in the CaPAL1 -silenced pepper plants during Xcv infection. Overexpression (OX) of CaPAL1 in Arabidopsis conferred increased resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato ( Pst ) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. CaPAL1 -OX leaves exhibited restricted Pst growth, increased ROS burst and cell death, and induction of PR1 expression and SA accumulation. The increase in PAL activity in healthy and Pst- infected leaves was higher in CaPAL1 -OX plants than in wild-type Arabidopsis. Taken together, these results suggest that CaPAL1 acts as a positive regulator of SA-dependent defence signalling to combat microbial pathogens via its enzymatic activity in the phenylpropanoid pathway.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-0957 ; E-ISSN: 1460-2431 ; DOI: 10.1093/jxb/eru109
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-0957
  • 00220957
  • 1460-2431
  • 14602431
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titleAn important role of the pepper phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene ( PAL1 ) in salicylic acid-dependent signalling of the defence response to microbial pathogens
creatorKim, Dae Sung ; Hwang, Byung Kook
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subjectArabidopsis ; Defence ; Pepper ; Phenylalanine Ammonia - Lyase ; Pv. .
descriptionPhenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is an inducible enzyme that responds to biotic and abiotic stresses. Results suggest the potential significance of pepper PAL1 in the plant defence response to microbial pathogens. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) has a crucial role in secondary phenylpropanoid metabolism and is one of the most extensively studied enzymes with respect to plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Here, we identified the pepper ( Capsicum annuum ) PAL ( CaPAL1 ) gene, which was induced in pepper leaves by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria ( Xcv ) infection. CaPAL1 -silenced pepper plants exhibited increased susceptibility to virulent and avirulent Xcv infection. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypersensitive cell death, expression of the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent marker gene CaPR1 , SA accumulation, and induction of PAL activity were significantly compromised in the CaPAL1 -silenced pepper plants during Xcv infection. Overexpression (OX) of CaPAL1 in Arabidopsis conferred increased resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato ( Pst ) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. CaPAL1 -OX leaves exhibited restricted Pst growth, increased ROS burst and cell death, and induction of PR1 expression and SA accumulation. The increase in PAL activity in healthy and Pst- infected leaves was higher in CaPAL1 -OX plants than in wild-type Arabidopsis. Taken together, these results suggest that CaPAL1 acts as a positive regulator of SA-dependent defence signalling to combat microbial pathogens via its enzymatic activity in the phenylpropanoid pathway.
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abstractPhenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is an inducible enzyme that responds to biotic and abiotic stresses. Results suggest the potential significance of pepper PAL1 in the plant defence response to microbial pathogens. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) has a crucial role in secondary phenylpropanoid metabolism and is one of the most extensively studied enzymes with respect to plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Here, we identified the pepper ( Capsicum annuum ) PAL ( CaPAL1 ) gene, which was induced in pepper leaves by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria ( Xcv ) infection. CaPAL1 -silenced pepper plants exhibited increased susceptibility to virulent and avirulent Xcv infection. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypersensitive cell death, expression of the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent marker gene CaPR1 , SA accumulation, and induction of PAL activity were significantly compromised in the CaPAL1 -silenced pepper plants during Xcv infection. Overexpression (OX) of CaPAL1 in Arabidopsis conferred increased resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato ( Pst ) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. CaPAL1 -OX leaves exhibited restricted Pst growth, increased ROS burst and cell death, and induction of PR1 expression and SA accumulation. The increase in PAL activity in healthy and Pst- infected leaves was higher in CaPAL1 -OX plants than in wild-type Arabidopsis. Taken together, these results suggest that CaPAL1 acts as a positive regulator of SA-dependent defence signalling to combat microbial pathogens via its enzymatic activity in the phenylpropanoid pathway.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.1093/jxb/eru109
date2014-06