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The Role of Technology in Mortgage Lending

Technology-based (“FinTech”) lenders increased their market share of U.S. mortgage lending from 2% to 8% from 2010 to 2016. Using loan-level data on mortgage applications and originations, we show that FinTech lenders process mortgage applications 20% faster than other lenders, controlling for obser... Full description

Journal Title: The Review of Financial Studies 2019, Vol. 32(5), pp.1854-1899
Main Author: Fuster, Andreas
Other Authors: Plosser, Matthew , Schnabl, Philipp , Vickery, James
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0893-9454 ; E-ISSN: 1465-7368 ; DOI: 10.1093/rfs/hhz018
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recordid: oxford10.1093/rfs/hhz018
title: The Role of Technology in Mortgage Lending
format: Article
creator:
  • Fuster, Andreas
  • Plosser, Matthew
  • Schnabl, Philipp
  • Vickery, James
subjects:
  • Business
ispartof: The Review of Financial Studies, 2019, Vol. 32(5), pp.1854-1899
description: Technology-based (“FinTech”) lenders increased their market share of U.S. mortgage lending from 2% to 8% from 2010 to 2016. Using loan-level data on mortgage applications and originations, we show that FinTech lenders process mortgage applications 20% faster than other lenders, controlling for observable characteristics. Faster processing does not come at the cost of higher defaults. FinTech lenders adjust supply more elastically than do other lenders in response to exogenous mortgage demand shocks. In areas with more FinTech lending, borrowers refinance more, especially when it is in their interest. We find no evidence that FinTech lenders target borrowers with low access to finance. Received June 1, 2017; editorial decision November 5, 2018 by Editor Wei Jiang. Authors have furnished an Internet Appendix, which is available on the Oxford University Press Web site next to the link to the final published paper online.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0893-9454 ; E-ISSN: 1465-7368 ; DOI: 10.1093/rfs/hhz018
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0893-9454
  • 08939454
  • 1465-7368
  • 14657368
url: Link


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descriptionTechnology-based (“FinTech”) lenders increased their market share of U.S. mortgage lending from 2% to 8% from 2010 to 2016. Using loan-level data on mortgage applications and originations, we show that FinTech lenders process mortgage applications 20% faster than other lenders, controlling for observable characteristics. Faster processing does not come at the cost of higher defaults. FinTech lenders adjust supply more elastically than do other lenders in response to exogenous mortgage demand shocks. In areas with more FinTech lending, borrowers refinance more, especially when it is in their interest. We find no evidence that FinTech lenders target borrowers with low access to finance. Received June 1, 2017; editorial decision November 5, 2018 by Editor Wei Jiang. Authors have furnished an Internet Appendix, which is available on the Oxford University Press Web site next to the link to the final published paper online.
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abstractTechnology-based (“FinTech”) lenders increased their market share of U.S. mortgage lending from 2% to 8% from 2010 to 2016. Using loan-level data on mortgage applications and originations, we show that FinTech lenders process mortgage applications 20% faster than other lenders, controlling for observable characteristics. Faster processing does not come at the cost of higher defaults. FinTech lenders adjust supply more elastically than do other lenders in response to exogenous mortgage demand shocks. In areas with more FinTech lending, borrowers refinance more, especially when it is in their interest. We find no evidence that FinTech lenders target borrowers with low access to finance. Received June 1, 2017; editorial decision November 5, 2018 by Editor Wei Jiang. Authors have furnished an Internet Appendix, which is available on the Oxford University Press Web site next to the link to the final published paper online.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.1093/rfs/hhz018
date2019-05-01