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210 Effect of diet complexity and specialty protein source on nursery pig performance

Seven hundred twenty nursery pigs (PIC C-29 × 359, initial BW 5.83 kg and 18-20 d of age) with 10 pigs/pen and 12 replications/treatment were used in a 42-d growth study evaluating diet type (DT; complex vs. simple) and protein source (PS; fish meal, HP300, or HP800) on growth performance. Complex d... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Animal Science 2017, Vol. 95(suppl2), pp.100-101
Main Author: Jones, A. M
Other Authors: Woodworth, J. C , Derouchey, J. M , Fitzner, G. E , Tokach, M. D , Dritz, S. S , Goodband, R. D
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0021-8812 ; E-ISSN: 1525-3163 ; DOI: 10.2527/asasmw.2017.12.210
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recordid: oxford10.2527/asasmw.2017.12.210
title: 210 Effect of diet complexity and specialty protein source on nursery pig performance
format: Article
creator:
  • Jones, A. M
  • Woodworth, J. C
  • Derouchey, J. M
  • Fitzner, G. E
  • Tokach, M. D
  • Dritz, S. S
  • Goodband, R. D
subjects:
  • Diet Complexity
  • Nursery Pig
  • Protein Sources
ispartof: Journal of Animal Science, 2017, Vol. 95(suppl2), pp.100-101
description: Seven hundred twenty nursery pigs (PIC C-29 × 359, initial BW 5.83 kg and 18-20 d of age) with 10 pigs/pen and 12 replications/treatment were used in a 42-d growth study evaluating diet type (DT; complex vs. simple) and protein source (PS; fish meal, HP300, or HP800) on growth performance. Complex diets contained 20 and 10% lactose, while simple diets contained 12 and 5% lactose in Phases 1 and 2, respectively. Complex diets contained 10% oat meal in both phases, while all diets contained 2% plasma in Phase 1 only. Soybean meal and SID Lys levels were equal within phase by adjusting fish meal, HP300, and HP800. Pens were allotted to 6 treatments in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement with main effects of DT and PS. Dietary treatments were the fixed effect and block and room served as the random effect. Phase 1 was budgeted at 2.27 kg/pig and Phase 2 was fed thereafter until d-21. A common diet was fed from d 21-42. For the overall treatment period (d 0-21), pigs fed complex had improved G:F ( P = 0.040) compared to pigs fed simple diets, but ADG and ADFI were not affected. Overall (d 0–42), no differences in growth were observed among treatments. In summary, the 3 specialty protein sources used resulted in similar growth. The complex diet had small positive benefits on growth during the first 21d; however, the benefits were not evident at the end of the common diet period. The general lack of responses to DT or PS could be related to health, a common ingredient quality issue or lower than expected performance from this facility.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0021-8812 ; E-ISSN: 1525-3163 ; DOI: 10.2527/asasmw.2017.12.210
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0021-8812
  • 00218812
  • 1525-3163
  • 15253163
url: Link


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title210 Effect of diet complexity and specialty protein source on nursery pig performance
creatorJones, A. M ; Woodworth, J. C ; Derouchey, J. M ; Fitzner, G. E ; Tokach, M. D ; Dritz, S. S ; Goodband, R. D
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descriptionSeven hundred twenty nursery pigs (PIC C-29 × 359, initial BW 5.83 kg and 18-20 d of age) with 10 pigs/pen and 12 replications/treatment were used in a 42-d growth study evaluating diet type (DT; complex vs. simple) and protein source (PS; fish meal, HP300, or HP800) on growth performance. Complex diets contained 20 and 10% lactose, while simple diets contained 12 and 5% lactose in Phases 1 and 2, respectively. Complex diets contained 10% oat meal in both phases, while all diets contained 2% plasma in Phase 1 only. Soybean meal and SID Lys levels were equal within phase by adjusting fish meal, HP300, and HP800. Pens were allotted to 6 treatments in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement with main effects of DT and PS. Dietary treatments were the fixed effect and block and room served as the random effect. Phase 1 was budgeted at 2.27 kg/pig and Phase 2 was fed thereafter until d-21. A common diet was fed from d 21-42. For the overall treatment period (d 0-21), pigs fed complex had improved G:F ( P = 0.040) compared to pigs fed simple diets, but ADG and ADFI were not affected. Overall (d 0–42), no differences in growth were observed among treatments. In summary, the 3 specialty protein sources used resulted in similar growth. The complex diet had small positive benefits on growth during the first 21d; however, the benefits were not evident at the end of the common diet period. The general lack of responses to DT or PS could be related to health, a common ingredient quality issue or lower than expected performance from this facility.
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title210 Effect of diet complexity and specialty protein source on nursery pig performance
descriptionSeven hundred twenty nursery pigs (PIC C-29 × 359, initial BW 5.83 kg and 18-20 d of age) with 10 pigs/pen and 12 replications/treatment were used in a 42-d growth study evaluating diet type (DT; complex vs. simple) and protein source (PS; fish meal, HP300, or HP800) on growth performance. Complex diets contained 20 and 10% lactose, while simple diets contained 12 and 5% lactose in Phases 1 and 2, respectively. Complex diets contained 10% oat meal in both phases, while all diets contained 2% plasma in Phase 1 only. Soybean meal and SID Lys levels were equal within phase by adjusting fish meal, HP300, and HP800. Pens were allotted to 6 treatments in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement with main effects of DT and PS. Dietary treatments were the fixed effect and block and room served as the random effect. Phase 1 was budgeted at 2.27 kg/pig and Phase 2 was fed thereafter until d-21. A common diet was fed from d 21-42. For the overall treatment period (d 0-21), pigs fed complex had improved G:F ( P = 0.040) compared to pigs fed simple diets, but ADG and ADFI were not affected. Overall (d 0–42), no differences in growth were observed among treatments. In summary, the 3 specialty protein sources used resulted in similar growth. The complex diet had small positive benefits on growth during the first 21d; however, the benefits were not evident at the end of the common diet period. The general lack of responses to DT or PS could be related to health, a common ingredient quality issue or lower than expected performance from this facility.
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abstractSeven hundred twenty nursery pigs (PIC C-29 × 359, initial BW 5.83 kg and 18-20 d of age) with 10 pigs/pen and 12 replications/treatment were used in a 42-d growth study evaluating diet type (DT; complex vs. simple) and protein source (PS; fish meal, HP300, or HP800) on growth performance. Complex diets contained 20 and 10% lactose, while simple diets contained 12 and 5% lactose in Phases 1 and 2, respectively. Complex diets contained 10% oat meal in both phases, while all diets contained 2% plasma in Phase 1 only. Soybean meal and SID Lys levels were equal within phase by adjusting fish meal, HP300, and HP800. Pens were allotted to 6 treatments in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement with main effects of DT and PS. Dietary treatments were the fixed effect and block and room served as the random effect. Phase 1 was budgeted at 2.27 kg/pig and Phase 2 was fed thereafter until d-21. A common diet was fed from d 21-42. For the overall treatment period (d 0-21), pigs fed complex had improved G:F ( P = 0.040) compared to pigs fed simple diets, but ADG and ADFI were not affected. Overall (d 0–42), no differences in growth were observed among treatments. In summary, the 3 specialty protein sources used resulted in similar growth. The complex diet had small positive benefits on growth during the first 21d; however, the benefits were not evident at the end of the common diet period. The general lack of responses to DT or PS could be related to health, a common ingredient quality issue or lower than expected performance from this facility.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.2527/asasmw.2017.12.210
date2017-03