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Protein- and zinc-deficient diets modulate the murine microbiome and metabolic phenotype

Background: Environmental enteropathy, which is linked to undernutrition and chronic infections, affects the physical and mental growth of children in developing areas worldwide. Key to understanding how these factors combine to shape developmental outcomes is to first understand the effects of nutr... Full description

Journal Title: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2016, Vol. 104(5), pp.1253-1262
Main Author: Mayneris - Perxachs, Jordi
Other Authors: Bolick, David T , Leng, Joy , Medlock, Greg L , Kolling, Glynis L , Papin, Jason A , Swann, Jonathan R , Guerrant, Richard L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0002-9165 ; E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.116.131797
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recordid: oxford10.3945/ajcn.116.131797
title: Protein- and zinc-deficient diets modulate the murine microbiome and metabolic phenotype
format: Article
creator:
  • Mayneris - Perxachs, Jordi
  • Bolick, David T
  • Leng, Joy
  • Medlock, Greg L
  • Kolling, Glynis L
  • Papin, Jason A
  • Swann, Jonathan R
  • Guerrant, Richard L
subjects:
  • Malnutrition
  • Metabolome Metabolic Phenotype
  • Metabolome Metabonomics
  • Microbiome Microbiota
  • Protein Deficiency
  • Undernutrition
  • Zinc Deficiency
ispartof: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2016, Vol. 104(5), pp.1253-1262
description: Background: Environmental enteropathy, which is linked to undernutrition and chronic infections, affects the physical and mental growth of children in developing areas worldwide. Key to understanding how these factors combine to shape developmental outcomes is to first understand the effects of nutritional deficiencies on the mammalian system including the effect on the gut microbiota. Objective: We dissected the nutritional components of environmental enteropathy by analyzing the specific metabolic and gut-microbiota changes that occur in weaned-mouse models of zinc or protein deficiency compared with well-nourished controls. Design: With the use of a 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy–based metabolic profiling approach with matching 16S microbiota analyses, the metabolic consequences and specific effects on the fecal microbiota of protein and zinc deficiency were probed independently in a murine model. Results: We showed considerable shifts within the intestinal microbiota 14–24 d postweaning in mice that were maintained on a normal diet (including increases in Proteobacteria and striking decreases in Bacterioidetes). Although the zinc-deficient microbiota were comparable to the age-matched, well-nourished profile, the protein-restricted microbiota remained closer in composition to the weaned enterotype with retention of Bacteroidetes. Striking increases in Verrucomicrobia (predominantly Akkermansia muciniphila ) were observed in both well-nourished and protein-deficient mice 14 d postweaning. We showed that protein malnutrition impaired growth and had major metabolic consequences (much more than with zinc deficiency) that included altered energy, polyamine, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Consistent with major changes in the gut microbiota, reductions in microbial proteolysis and increases in microbial dietary choline processing were observed. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with metabolic alterations that we previously observed in malnourished children. The results show that we can model the metabolic consequences of malnutrition in the mouse to help dissect relevant pathways involved in the effects of undernutrition and their contribution to environmental enteric dysfunction.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-9165 ; E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.116.131797
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-9165
  • 00029165
  • 1938-3207
  • 19383207
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titleProtein- and zinc-deficient diets modulate the murine microbiome and metabolic phenotype
creatorMayneris - Perxachs, Jordi ; Bolick, David T ; Leng, Joy ; Medlock, Greg L ; Kolling, Glynis L ; Papin, Jason A ; Swann, Jonathan R ; Guerrant, Richard L
ispartofThe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2016, Vol. 104(5), pp.1253-1262
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subjectMalnutrition ; Metabolome Metabolic Phenotype ; Metabolome Metabonomics ; Microbiome Microbiota ; Protein Deficiency ; Undernutrition ; Zinc Deficiency
descriptionBackground: Environmental enteropathy, which is linked to undernutrition and chronic infections, affects the physical and mental growth of children in developing areas worldwide. Key to understanding how these factors combine to shape developmental outcomes is to first understand the effects of nutritional deficiencies on the mammalian system including the effect on the gut microbiota. Objective: We dissected the nutritional components of environmental enteropathy by analyzing the specific metabolic and gut-microbiota changes that occur in weaned-mouse models of zinc or protein deficiency compared with well-nourished controls. Design: With the use of a 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy–based metabolic profiling approach with matching 16S microbiota analyses, the metabolic consequences and specific effects on the fecal microbiota of protein and zinc deficiency were probed independently in a murine model. Results: We showed considerable shifts within the intestinal microbiota 14–24 d postweaning in mice that were maintained on a normal diet (including increases in Proteobacteria and striking decreases in Bacterioidetes). Although the zinc-deficient microbiota were comparable to the age-matched, well-nourished profile, the protein-restricted microbiota remained closer in composition to the weaned enterotype with retention of Bacteroidetes. Striking increases in Verrucomicrobia (predominantly Akkermansia muciniphila ) were observed in both well-nourished and protein-deficient mice 14 d postweaning. We showed that protein malnutrition impaired growth and had major metabolic consequences (much more than with zinc deficiency) that included altered energy, polyamine, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Consistent with major changes in the gut microbiota, reductions in microbial proteolysis and increases in microbial dietary choline processing were observed. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with metabolic alterations that we previously observed in malnourished children. The results show that we can model the metabolic consequences of malnutrition in the mouse to help dissect relevant pathways involved in the effects of undernutrition and their contribution to environmental enteric dysfunction.
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titleProtein- and zinc-deficient diets modulate the murine microbiome and metabolic phenotype
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1Objective: We dissected the nutritional components of environmental enteropathy by analyzing the specific metabolic and gut-microbiota changes that occur in weaned-mouse models of zinc or protein deficiency compared with well-nourished controls.
2Design: With the use of a 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy–based metabolic profiling approach with matching 16S microbiota analyses, the metabolic consequences and specific effects on the fecal microbiota of protein and zinc deficiency were probed independently in a murine model.
3Results: We showed considerable shifts within the intestinal microbiota 14–24 d postweaning in mice that were maintained on a normal diet (including increases in Proteobacteria and striking decreases in Bacterioidetes). Although the zinc-deficient microbiota were comparable to the age-matched, well-nourished profile, the protein-restricted microbiota remained closer in composition to the weaned enterotype with retention of Bacteroidetes. Striking increases in Verrucomicrobia (predominantly Akkermansia muciniphila ) were observed in both well-nourished and protein-deficient mice 14 d postweaning. We showed that protein malnutrition impaired growth and had major metabolic consequences (much more than with zinc deficiency) that included altered energy, polyamine, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Consistent with major changes in the gut microbiota, reductions in microbial proteolysis and increases in microbial dietary choline processing were observed.
4Conclusions: These findings are consistent with metabolic alterations that we previously observed in malnourished children. The results show that we can model the metabolic consequences of malnutrition in the mouse to help dissect relevant pathways involved in the effects of undernutrition and their contribution to environmental enteric dysfunction.
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abstractBackground: Environmental enteropathy, which is linked to undernutrition and chronic infections, affects the physical and mental growth of children in developing areas worldwide. Key to understanding how these factors combine to shape developmental outcomes is to first understand the effects of nutritional deficiencies on the mammalian system including the effect on the gut microbiota. Objective: We dissected the nutritional components of environmental enteropathy by analyzing the specific metabolic and gut-microbiota changes that occur in weaned-mouse models of zinc or protein deficiency compared with well-nourished controls. Design: With the use of a 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy–based metabolic profiling approach with matching 16S microbiota analyses, the metabolic consequences and specific effects on the fecal microbiota of protein and zinc deficiency were probed independently in a murine model. Results: We showed considerable shifts within the intestinal microbiota 14–24 d postweaning in mice that were maintained on a normal diet (including increases in Proteobacteria and striking decreases in Bacterioidetes). Although the zinc-deficient microbiota were comparable to the age-matched, well-nourished profile, the protein-restricted microbiota remained closer in composition to the weaned enterotype with retention of Bacteroidetes. Striking increases in Verrucomicrobia (predominantly Akkermansia muciniphila ) were observed in both well-nourished and protein-deficient mice 14 d postweaning. We showed that protein malnutrition impaired growth and had major metabolic consequences (much more than with zinc deficiency) that included altered energy, polyamine, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Consistent with major changes in the gut microbiota, reductions in microbial proteolysis and increases in microbial dietary choline processing were observed. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with metabolic alterations that we previously observed in malnourished children. The results show that we can model the metabolic consequences of malnutrition in the mouse to help dissect relevant pathways involved in the effects of undernutrition and their contribution to environmental enteric dysfunction.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.3945/ajcn.116.131797
date2016-11-01