schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Exploring the recognition memory deficit in Parkinson's disease: estimates of recollection versus familiarity

Current theories postulate that recognition memory can be supported by two independent processes: recollection (i.e. vivid memory for an item and the contextual details surrounding it) versus familiarity (i.e. the mere sense that an item is old). There is conflicting evidence on whether recognition... Full description

Journal Title: Brain 2006, Vol.129(7), pp.1768-1779
Main Author: Davidson, Patrick S. R
Other Authors: Anaki, David , Saint - Cyr, Jean A , Chow, Tiffany W , Moscovitch, Morris
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0006-8950 ; E-ISSN: 1460-2156 ; DOI: 10.1093/brain/awl115
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: oxford_sgml10.1093/brain/awl115
title: Exploring the recognition memory deficit in Parkinson's disease: estimates of recollection versus familiarity
format: Article
creator:
  • Davidson, Patrick S. R
  • Anaki, David
  • Saint - Cyr, Jean A
  • Chow, Tiffany W
  • Moscovitch, Morris
subjects:
  • Medicine
ispartof: Brain, 2006, Vol.129(7), pp.1768-1779
description: Current theories postulate that recognition memory can be supported by two independent processes: recollection (i.e. vivid memory for an item and the contextual details surrounding it) versus familiarity (i.e. the mere sense that an item is old). There is conflicting evidence on whether recognition memory is impaired in Parkinson's disease, perhaps because few studies have separated recollection from familiarity. We aimed to explore whether recollection or familiarity is more likely to be affected by Parkinson's disease, using three methods: (i) the word-frequency mirror effect to make inferences about recollection and familiarity based on recognition of high- versus low-frequency words, (ii) subjective estimates of recollection (remembering) versus familiarity (knowing), and (iii) a process-dissociation procedure where participants are required to endorse only some of the previously studied items on a recognition memory test, but not others. We tested Parkinson's disease patients ( n = 19 and n = 16, age range = 5877 years and age range = 5075 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively) and age- and education-matched controls ( n = 23 and n = 16 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively). Overall, the Parkinson's disease group showed a reduction in recognition memory, but this appeared to be primarily due to impairment of familiarity, with a lesser decline in recollection. We discuss how this pattern may be related to dysfunction of striatal, prefrontal and/or medial temporal regions in Parkinson's disease.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0006-8950 ; E-ISSN: 1460-2156 ; DOI: 10.1093/brain/awl115
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0006-8950
  • 00068950
  • 1460-2156
  • 14602156
url: Link


@attributes
ID841190126
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1093/brain/awl115
sourceidoxford_sgml
recordidTN_oxford_sgml10.1093/brain/awl115
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
pqid19442075
display
typearticle
titleExploring the recognition memory deficit in Parkinson's disease: estimates of recollection versus familiarity
creatorDavidson, Patrick S. R ; Anaki, David ; Saint - Cyr, Jean A ; Chow, Tiffany W ; Moscovitch, Morris
ispartofBrain, 2006, Vol.129(7), pp.1768-1779
identifier
descriptionCurrent theories postulate that recognition memory can be supported by two independent processes: recollection (i.e. vivid memory for an item and the contextual details surrounding it) versus familiarity (i.e. the mere sense that an item is old). There is conflicting evidence on whether recognition memory is impaired in Parkinson's disease, perhaps because few studies have separated recollection from familiarity. We aimed to explore whether recollection or familiarity is more likely to be affected by Parkinson's disease, using three methods: (i) the word-frequency mirror effect to make inferences about recollection and familiarity based on recognition of high- versus low-frequency words, (ii) subjective estimates of recollection (remembering) versus familiarity (knowing), and (iii) a process-dissociation procedure where participants are required to endorse only some of the previously studied items on a recognition memory test, but not others. We tested Parkinson's disease patients ( n = 19 and n = 16, age range = 5877 years and age range = 5075 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively) and age- and education-matched controls ( n = 23 and n = 16 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively). Overall, the Parkinson's disease group showed a reduction in recognition memory, but this appeared to be primarily due to impairment of familiarity, with a lesser decline in recollection. We discuss how this pattern may be related to dysfunction of striatal, prefrontal and/or medial temporal regions in Parkinson's disease.
source
subjectMedicine;
version5
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Davidson, Patrick S. R
1Anaki, David
2Saint-Cyr, Jean A
3Chow, Tiffany W
4Moscovitch, Morris
titleExploring the recognition memory deficit in Parkinson's disease: estimates of recollection versus familiarity
descriptionCurrent theories postulate that recognition memory can be supported by two independent processes: recollection (i.e. vivid memory for an item and the contextual details surrounding it) versus familiarity (i.e. the mere sense that an item is old). There is conflicting evidence on whether recognition memory is impaired in Parkinson's disease, perhaps because few studies have separated recollection from familiarity. We aimed to explore whether recollection or familiarity is more likely to be affected by Parkinson's disease, using three methods: (i) the word-frequency mirror effect to make inferences about recollection and familiarity based on recognition of high- versus low-frequency words, (ii) subjective estimates of recollection (remembering) versus familiarity (knowing), and (iii) a process-dissociation procedure where participants are required to endorse only some of the previously studied items on a recognition memory test, but not others. We tested Parkinson's disease patients ( n = 19 and n = 16, age range = 5877 years and age range = 5075 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively) and age- and education-matched controls ( n = 23 and n = 16 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively). Overall, the Parkinson's disease group showed a reduction in recognition memory, but this appeared to be primarily due to impairment of familiarity, with a lesser decline in recollection. We discuss how this pattern may be related to dysfunction of striatal, prefrontal and/or medial temporal regions in Parkinson's disease.
general
010.1093/brain/awl115
1Oxford University Press
sourceidoxford_sgml
recordidoxford_sgml10.1093/brain/awl115
issn
00006-8950
100068950
21460-2156
314602156
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2006
addtitleBrain
searchscopeoxford
scopeoxford
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[subject, pages, pqid]
sort
titleExploring the recognition memory deficit in Parkinson's disease: estimates of recollection versus familiarity
creationdate20060000
authorDavidson, Patrick S. R ; Anaki, David ; Saint - Cyr, Jean A ; Chow, Tiffany W ; Moscovitch, Morris
facets
frbrgroupid4776938759183067622
frbrtype5
creationdate2006
collectionOxford Journals (Oxford University Press)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Davidson, Patrick S. R.
1Anaki, David
2Saint-Cyr, Jean A.
3Chow, Tiffany W.
4Moscovitch, Morris
jtitleBrain
toplevelpeer_reviewed
frbr
t2
k12006
k2
000068950
114602156
k310.1093/brain/awl115
k4129
k57
k61768
k7brain
k8exploring the recognition memory deficit in parkinson apos s disease estimates of recollection versus familiarity
k9exploringtherecognitarity
k12exploringtherecognitionme
k15patricksrdavidson
k16davidsonpatricksr
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
ranking
booster11
booster21
pcg_typepublisher
addata
aulast
0Davidson
1Anaki
2Saint-Cyr
3Chow
4Moscovitch
aufirst
0Patrick S. R.
1David
2Jean A.
3Tiffany W.
4Morris
au
0Davidson, Patrick S. R.
1Anaki, David
2Saint-Cyr, Jean A.
3Chow, Tiffany W.
4Moscovitch, Morris
atitleExploring the recognition memory deficit in Parkinson's disease: estimates of recollection versus familiarity
jtitleBrain
risdate200607
volume129
issue7
spage1768
epage1779
issn0006-8950
eissn1460-2156
formatarticle
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractCurrent theories postulate that recognition memory can be supported by two independent processes: recollection (i.e. vivid memory for an item and the contextual details surrounding it) versus familiarity (i.e. the mere sense that an item is old). There is conflicting evidence on whether recognition memory is impaired in Parkinson's disease, perhaps because few studies have separated recollection from familiarity. We aimed to explore whether recollection or familiarity is more likely to be affected by Parkinson's disease, using three methods: (i) the word-frequency mirror effect to make inferences about recollection and familiarity based on recognition of high- versus low-frequency words, (ii) subjective estimates of recollection (remembering) versus familiarity (knowing), and (iii) a process-dissociation procedure where participants are required to endorse only some of the previously studied items on a recognition memory test, but not others. We tested Parkinson's disease patients ( n = 19 and n = 16, age range = 5877 years and age range = 5075 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively) and age- and education-matched controls ( n = 23 and n = 16 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively). Overall, the Parkinson's disease group showed a reduction in recognition memory, but this appeared to be primarily due to impairment of familiarity, with a lesser decline in recollection. We discuss how this pattern may be related to dysfunction of striatal, prefrontal and/or medial temporal regions in Parkinson's disease.
pubOxford University Press
doi10.1093/brain/awl115
pages1768-17679
date2006-07