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Body Mass Index and Risk of Prostate Cancer in U.S. Health Professionals

The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and prostate cancer risk may be complex because obesity is associated with various hormonal factors and because the influence of BMI may differ according to whether the cancers are hereditary or sporadic. We used data from the Health Professionals Follo... Full description

Journal Title: JNCI : Journal of the National Cancer Institute 2003-08-20, Vol.95 (16), p.1240-1244
Main Author: Giovannucci, Edward
Other Authors: Rimm, Eric B , Liu, Yan , Leitzmann, Michael , Wu, Kana , Stampfer, Meir J , Willett, Walter C
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Cary, NC: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 0027-8874
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title: Body Mass Index and Risk of Prostate Cancer in U.S. Health Professionals
format: Article
creator:
  • Giovannucci, Edward
  • Rimm, Eric B
  • Liu, Yan
  • Leitzmann, Michael
  • Wu, Kana
  • Stampfer, Meir J
  • Willett, Walter C
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Age Distribution
  • Aged
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Body Mass Index
  • Disease susceptibility
  • Health aspects
  • Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Male
  • Medical personnel
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Nephrology. Urinary tract diseases
  • Prospective Studies
  • Prostate cancer
  • Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
  • Prostatic Neoplasms - etiology
  • Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics
  • Research
  • Risk Assessment
  • Risk Factors
  • Tumors of the urinary system
  • United States - epidemiology
  • Urinary tract. Prostate gland
ispartof: JNCI : Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2003-08-20, Vol.95 (16), p.1240-1244
description: The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and prostate cancer risk may be complex because obesity is associated with various hormonal factors and because the influence of BMI may differ according to whether the cancers are hereditary or sporadic. We used data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, in which 2896 incident cases of prostate cancer were reported from February 1, 1986, through January 31, 2000, to determine prospectively whether BMI was associated with the risk of hereditary (men
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0027-8874
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0027-8874
  • 1460-2105
url: Link


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titleBody Mass Index and Risk of Prostate Cancer in U.S. Health Professionals
creatorGiovannucci, Edward ; Rimm, Eric B ; Liu, Yan ; Leitzmann, Michael ; Wu, Kana ; Stampfer, Meir J ; Willett, Walter C
creatorcontribGiovannucci, Edward ; Rimm, Eric B ; Liu, Yan ; Leitzmann, Michael ; Wu, Kana ; Stampfer, Meir J ; Willett, Walter C
descriptionThe relationship between body mass index (BMI) and prostate cancer risk may be complex because obesity is associated with various hormonal factors and because the influence of BMI may differ according to whether the cancers are hereditary or sporadic. We used data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, in which 2896 incident cases of prostate cancer were reported from February 1, 1986, through January 31, 2000, to determine prospectively whether BMI was associated with the risk of hereditary (men <60 years of age or with a positive family history of prostate cancer) and sporadic (men ≥60 years of age and without such a family history) prostate cancer. The risk of prostate cancer in men with a higher BMI (≥30 kg/m2) was lower than that in men with a lower BMI (23–24.9 kg/m2) but only if they were younger (<60 years old) (relative risk = 0.52, 95% confidence interval = 0.33 to 0.83; Ptrend<.001) or had a family history of prostate cancer (relative risk = 0.74, 95% confidence interval = 0.45 to 1.19; Ptrend = .01). However, for groups with more sporadic cancers, BMI had a weak, non–statistically significant positive association with prostate cancer. We observed statistically significant interactions between BMI and age (Pinteraction<.001, two-sided Wald test) and between BMI and family history of prostate cancer (Pinteraction = .006, two-sided Wald test). Patterns for BMI and waist circumference were similar. Because obesity is associated with lower circulating concentrations of testosterone, our results suggest the hypothesis that androgens may play a more direct role for early-onset or hereditary prostate cancers than for sporadic prostate cancers.
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subjectAdult ; Age Distribution ; Aged ; Biological and medical sciences ; Body Mass Index ; Disease susceptibility ; Health aspects ; Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data ; Humans ; Incidence ; Male ; Medical personnel ; Medical sciences ; Middle Aged ; Multivariate Analysis ; Nephrology. Urinary tract diseases ; Prospective Studies ; Prostate cancer ; Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology ; Prostatic Neoplasms - etiology ; Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics ; Research ; Risk Assessment ; Risk Factors ; Tumors of the urinary system ; United States - epidemiology ; Urinary tract. Prostate gland
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descriptionThe relationship between body mass index (BMI) and prostate cancer risk may be complex because obesity is associated with various hormonal factors and because the influence of BMI may differ according to whether the cancers are hereditary or sporadic. We used data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, in which 2896 incident cases of prostate cancer were reported from February 1, 1986, through January 31, 2000, to determine prospectively whether BMI was associated with the risk of hereditary (men <60 years of age or with a positive family history of prostate cancer) and sporadic (men ≥60 years of age and without such a family history) prostate cancer. The risk of prostate cancer in men with a higher BMI (≥30 kg/m2) was lower than that in men with a lower BMI (23–24.9 kg/m2) but only if they were younger (<60 years old) (relative risk = 0.52, 95% confidence interval = 0.33 to 0.83; Ptrend<.001) or had a family history of prostate cancer (relative risk = 0.74, 95% confidence interval = 0.45 to 1.19; Ptrend = .01). However, for groups with more sporadic cancers, BMI had a weak, non–statistically significant positive association with prostate cancer. We observed statistically significant interactions between BMI and age (Pinteraction<.001, two-sided Wald test) and between BMI and family history of prostate cancer (Pinteraction = .006, two-sided Wald test). Patterns for BMI and waist circumference were similar. Because obesity is associated with lower circulating concentrations of testosterone, our results suggest the hypothesis that androgens may play a more direct role for early-onset or hereditary prostate cancers than for sporadic prostate cancers.
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notesCorrespondence to: Edward Giovannucci, MD, ScD, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115 (e-mail: edward. giovannucci@channing.harvard.edu).
abstractThe relationship between body mass index (BMI) and prostate cancer risk may be complex because obesity is associated with various hormonal factors and because the influence of BMI may differ according to whether the cancers are hereditary or sporadic. We used data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, in which 2896 incident cases of prostate cancer were reported from February 1, 1986, through January 31, 2000, to determine prospectively whether BMI was associated with the risk of hereditary (men <60 years of age or with a positive family history of prostate cancer) and sporadic (men ≥60 years of age and without such a family history) prostate cancer. The risk of prostate cancer in men with a higher BMI (≥30 kg/m2) was lower than that in men with a lower BMI (23–24.9 kg/m2) but only if they were younger (<60 years old) (relative risk = 0.52, 95% confidence interval = 0.33 to 0.83; Ptrend<.001) or had a family history of prostate cancer (relative risk = 0.74, 95% confidence interval = 0.45 to 1.19; Ptrend = .01). However, for groups with more sporadic cancers, BMI had a weak, non–statistically significant positive association with prostate cancer. We observed statistically significant interactions between BMI and age (Pinteraction<.001, two-sided Wald test) and between BMI and family history of prostate cancer (Pinteraction = .006, two-sided Wald test). Patterns for BMI and waist circumference were similar. Because obesity is associated with lower circulating concentrations of testosterone, our results suggest the hypothesis that androgens may play a more direct role for early-onset or hereditary prostate cancers than for sporadic prostate cancers.
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