schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Comparing the DNA Hypermethylome with Gene Mutations in Human Colorectal Cancer (Gene Hypermethylation and Mutations)

We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we... Full description

Journal Title: PLoS Genetics 2007, Vol.3(9), p.e157
Main Author: Schuebel, Kornel E
Other Authors: Chen, Wei , Cope, Leslie , Glöckner, Sabine C , Suzuki, Hiromu , Yi, Joo-Mi , Chan, Timothy A , Neste, Leander Van , Criekinge, Wim Van , Bosch, Sandra van den , van Engeland, Manon , Ting, Angela H , Jair, Kamwing , Yu, Wayne , Toyota, Minoru , Imai, Kohzoh , Ahuja, Nita , Herman, James G , Baylin, Stephen B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1553-7390 ; E-ISSN: 1553-7404 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.0030157
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: plos10.1371/journal.pgen.0030157
title: Comparing the DNA Hypermethylome with Gene Mutations in Human Colorectal Cancer (Gene Hypermethylation and Mutations)
format: Article
creator:
  • Schuebel, Kornel E
  • Chen, Wei
  • Cope, Leslie
  • Glöckner, Sabine C
  • Suzuki, Hiromu
  • Yi, Joo-Mi
  • Chan, Timothy A
  • Neste, Leander Van
  • Criekinge, Wim Van
  • Bosch, Sandra van den
  • van Engeland, Manon
  • Ting, Angela H
  • Jair, Kamwing
  • Yu, Wayne
  • Toyota, Minoru
  • Imai, Kohzoh
  • Ahuja, Nita
  • Herman, James G
  • Baylin, Stephen B
subjects:
  • Research Article
  • Genetics And Genomics
  • Homo (human)
ispartof: PLoS Genetics, 2007, Vol.3(9), p.e157
description: We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken. ; Loss of gene expression in association with aberrant accumulation of 5-methylcytosine in gene promoter CpG islands is a common feature of human cancer. Here, we describe a method to discover these genes that permits identification of hundreds of novel candidate cancer genes in any cancer cell line. We now estimate that as much as 5% of colon cancer genes may harbor aberrant gene hypermethylation and we term these the cancer “promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylome.” Multiple mutated genes recently identified via cancer resequencing efforts are shown to be within this hypermethylome and to be more likely to undergo epigenetic inactivation than genetic alteration. Our approach allows derivation of new potential tumor biomarkers and potential pathways for therapeutic intervention. Importantly, our findings illustrate that efforts aimed at complete identification of the human cancer genome should include analyses of epigenetic, as well as genetic, changes.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1553-7390 ; E-ISSN: 1553-7404 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.0030157
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1553-7390
  • 1553-7404
  • 15537390
  • 15537404
url: Link


@attributes
ID1892626466
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1371/journal.pgen.0030157
sourceidplos
recordidTN_plos10.1371/journal.pgen.0030157
sourcesystemPC
pqid1313485924
galeid171020180
display
typearticle
titleComparing the DNA Hypermethylome with Gene Mutations in Human Colorectal Cancer (Gene Hypermethylation and Mutations)
creatorSchuebel, Kornel E ; Chen, Wei ; Cope, Leslie ; Glöckner, Sabine C ; Suzuki, Hiromu ; Yi, Joo-Mi ; Chan, Timothy A ; Neste, Leander Van ; Criekinge, Wim Van ; Bosch, Sandra van den ; van Engeland, Manon ; Ting, Angela H ; Jair, Kamwing ; Yu, Wayne ; Toyota, Minoru ; Imai, Kohzoh ; Ahuja, Nita ; Herman, James G ; Baylin, Stephen B
contributorLee, Jeannie T (Editor)
ispartofPLoS Genetics, 2007, Vol.3(9), p.e157
identifier
subjectResearch Article ; Genetics And Genomics ; Homo (human)
descriptionWe have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken. ; Loss of gene expression in association with aberrant accumulation of 5-methylcytosine in gene promoter CpG islands is a common feature of human cancer. Here, we describe a method to discover these genes that permits identification of hundreds of novel candidate cancer genes in any cancer cell line. We now estimate that as much as 5% of colon cancer genes may harbor aberrant gene hypermethylation and we term these the cancer “promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylome.” Multiple mutated genes recently identified via cancer resequencing efforts are shown to be within this hypermethylome and to be more likely to undergo epigenetic inactivation than genetic alteration. Our approach allows derivation of new potential tumor biomarkers and potential pathways for therapeutic intervention. Importantly, our findings illustrate that efforts aimed at complete identification of the human cancer genome should include analyses of epigenetic, as well as genetic, changes.
languageeng
source
version9
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Schuebel, Kornel E
1Chen, Wei
2Cope, Leslie
3Glöckner, Sabine C
4Suzuki, Hiromu
5Yi, Joo-Mi
6Chan, Timothy A
7Neste, Leander Van
8Criekinge, Wim Van
9Bosch, Sandra van den
10van Engeland, Manon
11Ting, Angela H
12Jair, Kamwing
13Yu, Wayne
14Toyota, Minoru
15Imai, Kohzoh
16Ahuja, Nita
17Herman, James G
18Baylin, Stephen B
19Lee, Jeannie T (Editor)
titleComparing the DNA Hypermethylome with Gene Mutations in Human Colorectal Cancer (Gene Hypermethylation and Mutations)
descriptionWe have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken. ; Loss of gene expression in association with aberrant accumulation of 5-methylcytosine in gene promoter CpG islands is a common feature of human cancer. Here, we describe a method to discover these genes that permits identification of hundreds of novel candidate cancer genes in any cancer cell line. We now estimate that as much as 5% of colon cancer genes may harbor aberrant gene hypermethylation and we term these the cancer “promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylome.” Multiple mutated genes recently identified via cancer resequencing efforts are shown to be within this hypermethylome and to be more likely to undergo epigenetic inactivation than genetic alteration. Our approach allows derivation of new potential tumor biomarkers and potential pathways for therapeutic intervention. Importantly, our findings illustrate that efforts aimed at complete identification of the human cancer genome should include analyses of epigenetic, as well as genetic, changes.
subject
0Research Article
1Genetics And Genomics
2Homo (human)
general
010.1371/journal.pgen.0030157
1English
sourceidplos
recordidplos10.1371/journal.pgen.0030157
issn
01553-7390
11553-7404
215537390
315537404
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2007
recordtypearticle
addtitle
0PLoS Genetics
1Gene Hypermethylation and Mutations
searchscopeplos
scopeplos
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, galeid]
sort
titleComparing the DNA Hypermethylome with Gene Mutations in Human Colorectal Cancer (Gene Hypermethylation and Mutations)
authorSchuebel, Kornel E ; Chen, Wei ; Cope, Leslie ; Glöckner, Sabine C ; Suzuki, Hiromu ; Yi, Joo-Mi ; Chan, Timothy A ; Neste, Leander Van ; Criekinge, Wim Van ; Bosch, Sandra van den ; van Engeland, Manon ; Ting, Angela H ; Jair, Kamwing ; Yu, Wayne ; Toyota, Minoru ; Imai, Kohzoh ; Ahuja, Nita ; Herman, James G ; Baylin, Stephen B
creationdate20070921
facets
frbrgroupid7942123711984485396
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2007
topic
0Research Article
1Genetics And Genomics
2Homo (human)
collectionPLoS
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Schuebel, Kornel E
1Chen, Wei
2Cope, Leslie
3Glöckner, Sabine C
4Suzuki, Hiromu
5Yi, Joo-Mi
6Chan, Timothy A
7Neste, Leander Van
8Criekinge, Wim Van
9Bosch, Sandra van den
10van Engeland, Manon
11Ting, Angela H
12Jair, Kamwing
13Yu, Wayne
14Toyota, Minoru
15Imai, Kohzoh
16Ahuja, Nita
17Herman, James G
18Baylin, Stephen B
19Lee, Jeannie T
jtitlePLoS Genetics
toplevelpeer_reviewed
frbr
t2
k12007
k2
015537390
115537404
k310.1371/journal.pgen.0030157
k43
k59
k6157
k7plos genetics
k8comparing the dna hypermethylome with gene mutations in human colorectal cancer
k9comparingthednahyperancer
k12comparingthednahypermethy
k15korneleschuebel
k16schuebelkornele
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
ranking
booster11
booster21
pcg_typepublisher
addata
aulast
0Schuebel
1Chen
2Cope
3Glöckner
4Suzuki
5Yi
6Chan
7Neste
8Criekinge
9Bosch
10van Engeland
11Ting
12Jair
13Yu
14Toyota
15Imai
16Ahuja
17Herman
18Baylin
19Lee
aufirst
0Kornel E
1Wei
2Leslie
3Sabine C
4Hiromu
5Joo-Mi
6Timothy A
7Leander Van
8Wim Van
9Sandra van den
10Manon
11Angela H
12Kamwing
13Wayne
14Minoru
15Kohzoh
16Nita
17James G
18Stephen B
19Jeannie T
au
0Schuebel, Kornel E
1Chen, Wei
2Cope, Leslie
3Glöckner, Sabine C
4Suzuki, Hiromu
5Yi, Joo-Mi
6Chan, Timothy A
7Neste, Leander Van
8Criekinge, Wim Van
9Bosch, Sandra van den
10van Engeland, Manon
11Ting, Angela H
12Jair, Kamwing
13Yu, Wayne
14Toyota, Minoru
15Imai, Kohzoh
16Ahuja, Nita
17Herman, James G
18Baylin, Stephen B
addauLee, Jeannie T
atitleComparing the DNA Hypermethylome with Gene Mutations in Human Colorectal Cancer (Gene Hypermethylation and Mutations)
jtitlePLoS Genetics
risdate20070921
volume3
issue9
spagee157
pagese157
issn1553-7390
eissn1553-7404
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractWe have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken. ; Loss of gene expression in association with aberrant accumulation of 5-methylcytosine in gene promoter CpG islands is a common feature of human cancer. Here, we describe a method to discover these genes that permits identification of hundreds of novel candidate cancer genes in any cancer cell line. We now estimate that as much as 5% of colon cancer genes may harbor aberrant gene hypermethylation and we term these the cancer “promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylome.” Multiple mutated genes recently identified via cancer resequencing efforts are shown to be within this hypermethylome and to be more likely to undergo epigenetic inactivation than genetic alteration. Our approach allows derivation of new potential tumor biomarkers and potential pathways for therapeutic intervention. Importantly, our findings illustrate that efforts aimed at complete identification of the human cancer genome should include analyses of epigenetic, as well as genetic, changes.
copSan Francisco, USA
pubPublic Library of Science
doi10.1371/journal.pgen.0030157
oafree_for_read
date2007-09-21