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Importance of Thinking Locally for Mental Health: Data from Cross-Sectional Surveys Representing South East London and England (Importance of Thinking Locally for Mental Health)

Reliance on national figures may be underestimating the extent of mental ill health in urban communities. This study demonstrates the necessity for local information on common mental disorder (CMD) and substance use by comparing data from the South East London Community Health (SELCoH) study with th... Full description

Journal Title: 2012 Vol.7(12), p.e48012
Main Author: Hatch, Stephani L
Other Authors: Woodhead, Charlotte , Frissa, Souci , Fear, Nicola T , Verdecchia, Maria , Stewart, Robert , Reichenberg, Abraham , Morgan, Craig , Bebbington, Paul , McManus, Sally , Brugha, Traolach , Kankulu, Bwalya , Clark, Jennifer L , Gazard, Billy , Medcalf, Robert , Hotopf, Matthew
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0048012
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recordid: plos10.1371/journal.pone.0048012
title: Importance of Thinking Locally for Mental Health: Data from Cross-Sectional Surveys Representing South East London and England (Importance of Thinking Locally for Mental Health)
format: Article
creator:
  • Hatch, Stephani L
  • Woodhead, Charlotte
  • Frissa, Souci
  • Fear, Nicola T
  • Verdecchia, Maria
  • Stewart, Robert
  • Reichenberg, Abraham
  • Morgan, Craig
  • Bebbington, Paul
  • McManus, Sally
  • Brugha, Traolach
  • Kankulu, Bwalya
  • Clark, Jennifer L
  • Gazard, Billy
  • Medcalf, Robert
  • Hotopf, Matthew
subjects:
  • Research Article
  • Medicine
  • Public Health And Epidemiology
  • Mental Health
  • Non-clinical Medicine
ispartof: 2012, Vol.7(12), p.e48012
description: Reliance on national figures may be underestimating the extent of mental ill health in urban communities. This study demonstrates the necessity for local information on common mental disorder (CMD) and substance use by comparing data from the South East London Community Health (SELCoH) study with those from a national study, the 2007 English Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Study (APMS). ; Data were used from two cross-sectional surveys, 1698 men and women residing in south London and 7403 men and women in England. The main outcome, CMD, was indicated by a score of 12 or above on the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Secondary outcomes included hazardous alcohol use and illicit drug use. SELCoH sample prevalence estimates of CMD were nearly twice that of the APMS England sample estimates. There was a four-fold greater proportion of depressive episode in the SELCoH sample than the APMS sample. The prevalence of hazardous alcohol use was higher in the national sample. Illicit drug use in the past year was higher in the SELCoH sample, with cannabis and cocaine the illicit drugs reported most frequently in both samples. In comparisons of the SELCoH sample with the APMS England sample and the APMS sample from the Greater London area in combined datasets, these differences remained after adjusting for socio-demographic and socioeconomic indicators for all outcomes. ; Local information for estimating the prevalence of CMD and substance use is essential for surveillance and service planning. There were similarities in the demographic and socioeconomic factors related to CMD and substance use across samples.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0048012
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1932-6203
  • 19326203
url: Link


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titleImportance of Thinking Locally for Mental Health: Data from Cross-Sectional Surveys Representing South East London and England (Importance of Thinking Locally for Mental Health)
creatorHatch, Stephani L ; Woodhead, Charlotte ; Frissa, Souci ; Fear, Nicola T ; Verdecchia, Maria ; Stewart, Robert ; Reichenberg, Abraham ; Morgan, Craig ; Bebbington, Paul ; McManus, Sally ; Brugha, Traolach ; Kankulu, Bwalya ; Clark, Jennifer L ; Gazard, Billy ; Medcalf, Robert ; Hotopf, Matthew
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subjectResearch Article ; Medicine ; Public Health And Epidemiology ; Mental Health ; Non-clinical Medicine
descriptionReliance on national figures may be underestimating the extent of mental ill health in urban communities. This study demonstrates the necessity for local information on common mental disorder (CMD) and substance use by comparing data from the South East London Community Health (SELCoH) study with those from a national study, the 2007 English Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Study (APMS). ; Data were used from two cross-sectional surveys, 1698 men and women residing in south London and 7403 men and women in England. The main outcome, CMD, was indicated by a score of 12 or above on the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Secondary outcomes included hazardous alcohol use and illicit drug use. SELCoH sample prevalence estimates of CMD were nearly twice that of the APMS England sample estimates. There was a four-fold greater proportion of depressive episode in the SELCoH sample than the APMS sample. The prevalence of hazardous alcohol use was higher in the national sample. Illicit drug use in the past year was higher in the SELCoH sample, with cannabis and cocaine the illicit drugs reported most frequently in both samples. In comparisons of the SELCoH sample with the APMS England sample and the APMS sample from the Greater London area in combined datasets, these differences remained after adjusting for socio-demographic and socioeconomic indicators for all outcomes. ; Local information for estimating the prevalence of CMD and substance use is essential for surveillance and service planning. There were similarities in the demographic and socioeconomic factors related to CMD and substance use across samples.
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titleImportance of Thinking Locally for Mental Health: Data from Cross-Sectional Surveys Representing South East London and England (Importance of Thinking Locally for Mental Health)
descriptionReliance on national figures may be underestimating the extent of mental ill health in urban communities. This study demonstrates the necessity for local information on common mental disorder (CMD) and substance use by comparing data from the South East London Community Health (SELCoH) study with those from a national study, the 2007 English Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Study (APMS). ; Data were used from two cross-sectional surveys, 1698 men and women residing in south London and 7403 men and women in England. The main outcome, CMD, was indicated by a score of 12 or above on the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Secondary outcomes included hazardous alcohol use and illicit drug use. SELCoH sample prevalence estimates of CMD were nearly twice that of the APMS England sample estimates. There was a four-fold greater proportion of depressive episode in the SELCoH sample than the APMS sample. The prevalence of hazardous alcohol use was higher in the national sample. Illicit drug use in the past year was higher in the SELCoH sample, with cannabis and cocaine the illicit drugs reported most frequently in both samples. In comparisons of the SELCoH sample with the APMS England sample and the APMS sample from the Greater London area in combined datasets, these differences remained after adjusting for socio-demographic and socioeconomic indicators for all outcomes. ; Local information for estimating the prevalence of CMD and substance use is essential for surveillance and service planning. There were similarities in the demographic and socioeconomic factors related to CMD and substance use across samples.
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abstractReliance on national figures may be underestimating the extent of mental ill health in urban communities. This study demonstrates the necessity for local information on common mental disorder (CMD) and substance use by comparing data from the South East London Community Health (SELCoH) study with those from a national study, the 2007 English Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Study (APMS). ; Data were used from two cross-sectional surveys, 1698 men and women residing in south London and 7403 men and women in England. The main outcome, CMD, was indicated by a score of 12 or above on the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Secondary outcomes included hazardous alcohol use and illicit drug use. SELCoH sample prevalence estimates of CMD were nearly twice that of the APMS England sample estimates. There was a four-fold greater proportion of depressive episode in the SELCoH sample than the APMS sample. The prevalence of hazardous alcohol use was higher in the national sample. Illicit drug use in the past year was higher in the SELCoH sample, with cannabis and cocaine the illicit drugs reported most frequently in both samples. In comparisons of the SELCoH sample with the APMS England sample and the APMS sample from the Greater London area in combined datasets, these differences remained after adjusting for socio-demographic and socioeconomic indicators for all outcomes. ; Local information for estimating the prevalence of CMD and substance use is essential for surveillance and service planning. There were similarities in the demographic and socioeconomic factors related to CMD and substance use across samples.
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date2012-12-12