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Selective control of cortical axonal spikes by a slowly inactivating K+ current

Neurons are flexible electrophysiological entities in which the distribution and properties of ionic channels control their behaviors. Through simultaneous somatic and axonal whole-cell recording of layer 5 pyramidal cells, we demonstrate a remarkable differential expression of slowly inactivating K... Full description

Journal Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 03 July 2007, Vol.104(27), p.11453
Main Author: Yousheng Shu
Other Authors: Yuguo Yu , Jing Yang , David A. Mccormick
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490 ; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0702041104
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recordid: pnas_s104_27_11453
title: Selective control of cortical axonal spikes by a slowly inactivating K+ current
format: Article
creator:
  • Yousheng Shu
  • Yuguo Yu
  • Jing Yang
  • David A. Mccormick
subjects:
  • Sciences (General)
ispartof: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 03 July 2007, Vol.104(27), p.11453
description: Neurons are flexible electrophysiological entities in which the distribution and properties of ionic channels control their behaviors. Through simultaneous somatic and axonal whole-cell recording of layer 5 pyramidal cells, we demonstrate a remarkable differential expression of slowly inactivating K + currents. Depolarizing the axon, but not the soma, rapidly activated a low-threshold, slowly inactivating, outward current that was potently blocked by low doses of 4-aminopyridine, α-dendrotoxin, and rTityustoxin-Kα. Block of this slowly inactivating current caused a large increase in spike duration in the axon but only a small increase in the soma and could result in distal axons generating repetitive discharge in response to local current injection. Importantly, this current was also responsible for slow changes in the axonal spike duration that are observed after somatic membrane potential change. These data indicate that low-threshold, slowly inactivating K + currents, containing Kv1.2 α subunits, play a key role in the flexible properties of intracortical axons and may contribute significantly to intracortical processing. axon cortex plasticity synaptic transmission
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490 ; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0702041104
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 0027-8424
  • 00278424
  • 1091-6490
  • 10916490
url: Link


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titleSelective control of cortical axonal spikes by a slowly inactivating K+ current
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descriptionNeurons are flexible electrophysiological entities in which the distribution and properties of ionic channels control their behaviors. Through simultaneous somatic and axonal whole-cell recording of layer 5 pyramidal cells, we demonstrate a remarkable differential expression of slowly inactivating K + currents. Depolarizing the axon, but not the soma, rapidly activated a low-threshold, slowly inactivating, outward current that was potently blocked by low doses of 4-aminopyridine, α-dendrotoxin, and rTityustoxin-Kα. Block of this slowly inactivating current caused a large increase in spike duration in the axon but only a small increase in the soma and could result in distal axons generating repetitive discharge in response to local current injection. Importantly, this current was also responsible for slow changes in the axonal spike duration that are observed after somatic membrane potential change. These data indicate that low-threshold, slowly inactivating K + currents, containing Kv1.2 α subunits, play a key role in the flexible properties of intracortical axons and may contribute significantly to intracortical processing. axon cortex plasticity synaptic transmission
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Neurons are flexible electrophysiological entities in which the distribution and properties of ionic channels control their behaviors. Through simultaneous somatic and axonal whole-cell recording of layer 5 pyramidal cells, we demonstrate a remarkable differential expression of slowly inactivating K + currents. Depolarizing the axon, but not the soma, rapidly activated a low-threshold, slowly inactivating, outward current that was potently blocked by low doses of 4-aminopyridine, α-dendrotoxin, and rTityustoxin-Kα. Block of this slowly inactivating current caused a large increase in spike duration in the axon but only a small increase in the soma and could result in distal axons generating repetitive discharge in response to local current injection. Importantly, this current was also responsible for slow changes in the axonal spike duration that are observed after somatic membrane potential change. These data indicate that low-threshold, slowly inactivating K + currents, containing Kv1.2 α subunits, play a key role in the flexible properties of intracortical axons and may contribute significantly to intracortical processing. axon cortex plasticity synaptic transmission

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Neurons are flexible electrophysiological entities in which the distribution and properties of ionic channels control their behaviors. Through simultaneous somatic and axonal whole-cell recording of layer 5 pyramidal cells, we demonstrate a remarkable differential expression of slowly inactivating K + currents. Depolarizing the axon, but not the soma, rapidly activated a low-threshold, slowly inactivating, outward current that was potently blocked by low doses of 4-aminopyridine, α-dendrotoxin, and rTityustoxin-Kα. Block of this slowly inactivating current caused a large increase in spike duration in the axon but only a small increase in the soma and could result in distal axons generating repetitive discharge in response to local current injection. Importantly, this current was also responsible for slow changes in the axonal spike duration that are observed after somatic membrane potential change. These data indicate that low-threshold, slowly inactivating K + currents, containing Kv1.2 α subunits, play a key role in the flexible properties of intracortical axons and may contribute significantly to intracortical processing. axon cortex plasticity synaptic transmission

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date2007-07-03