schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Lag threads organize the brain’s intrinsic activity

It has been widely reported that intrinsic brain activity, in a variety of animals including humans, is spatiotemporally structured. Specifically, propagated slow activity has been repeatedly demonstrated in animals. In human resting-state fMRI, spontaneous activity has been understood predominantly... Full description

Journal Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 28 April 2015, Vol.112(17), p.E2235
Main Author: Anish Mitra
Other Authors: Abraham Z. Snyder , Tyler Blazey , Marcus E. Raichle
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490 ; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1503960112
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: pnas_s112_17_E2235
title: Lag threads organize the brain’s intrinsic activity
format: Article
creator:
  • Anish Mitra
  • Abraham Z. Snyder
  • Tyler Blazey
  • Marcus E. Raichle
subjects:
  • Sciences (General)
ispartof: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 28 April 2015, Vol.112(17), p.E2235
description: It has been widely reported that intrinsic brain activity, in a variety of animals including humans, is spatiotemporally structured. Specifically, propagated slow activity has been repeatedly demonstrated in animals. In human resting-state fMRI, spontaneous activity has been understood predominantly in terms of zero-lag temporal synchrony within widely distributed functional systems (resting-state networks). Here, we use resting-state fMRI from 1,376 normal, young adults to demonstrate that multiple, highly reproducible, temporal sequences of propagated activity, which we term "lag threads," are present in the brain. Moreover, this propagated activity is largely unidirectional within conventionally understood resting-state networks. Modeling experiments show that resting-state networks naturally emerge as a consequence of shared patterns of propagation. An implication of these results is that common physiologic mechanisms may underlie spontaneous activity as imaged with fMRI in humans and slowly propagated activity as studied in animals. fMRI | dynamics | resting state | intrinsic activity
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490 ; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1503960112
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 0027-8424
  • 00278424
  • 1091-6490
  • 10916490
url: Link


@attributes
ID1415081338
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid112_17_E2235
sourceidpnas_s
recordidTN_pnas_s112_17_E2235
sourcesystemPC
dbid
0PNE
1RNA
pqid1680232440
galeid433686810
display
typearticle
titleLag threads organize the brain’s intrinsic activity
creatorAnish Mitra ; Abraham Z. Snyder ; Tyler Blazey ; Marcus E. Raichle
ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 28 April 2015, Vol.112(17), p.E2235
identifier
subjectSciences (General)
languageeng
source
descriptionIt has been widely reported that intrinsic brain activity, in a variety of animals including humans, is spatiotemporally structured. Specifically, propagated slow activity has been repeatedly demonstrated in animals. In human resting-state fMRI, spontaneous activity has been understood predominantly in terms of zero-lag temporal synchrony within widely distributed functional systems (resting-state networks). Here, we use resting-state fMRI from 1,376 normal, young adults to demonstrate that multiple, highly reproducible, temporal sequences of propagated activity, which we term "lag threads," are present in the brain. Moreover, this propagated activity is largely unidirectional within conventionally understood resting-state networks. Modeling experiments show that resting-state networks naturally emerge as a consequence of shared patterns of propagation. An implication of these results is that common physiologic mechanisms may underlie spontaneous activity as imaged with fMRI in humans and slowly propagated activity as studied in animals. fMRI | dynamics | resting state | intrinsic activity
version9
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
linktorsrc$$Uhttp://www.pnas.org/content/112/17/E2235.abstract$$EView_full_text_in_National_Academy_of_Sciences_(Access_to_full_text_may_be_restricted)
search
creatorcontrib
0Anish Mitra
1Abraham Z. Snyder
2Tyler Blazey
3Marcus E. Raichle
titleLag threads organize the brain’s intrinsic activity
subjectSciences (General)
general
0English
1National Acad Sciences
210.1073/pnas.1503960112
3PNAS (National Academy of Sciences)
4National Academy of Sciences (U.S.)
sourceidpnas_s
recordidpnas_s112_17_E2235
issn
00027-8424
100278424
21091-6490
310916490
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2015
addtitleProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
searchscope
0pnas_full
1pnas4
2pnas5
scope
0pnas_full
1pnas4
2pnas5
lsr45$$EView_full_text_in_National_Academy_of_Sciences_(Access_to_full_text_may_be_restricted)
tmp01
0PNAS (National Academy of Sciences)
1National Academy of Sciences (U.S.)
tmp02
0PNE
1RNA
startdate20150428
enddate20150428
lsr40Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 28 April 2015, Vol.112 (17), p.E2235
doi10.1073/pnas.1503960112
citationpf E2235 vol 112 issue 17
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pages, description, pqid, galeid]
sort
titleLag threads organize the brain’s intrinsic activity
authorAnish Mitra ; Abraham Z. Snyder ; Tyler Blazey ; Marcus E. Raichle
creationdate20150428
lso0120150428
facets
frbrgroupid8176610901057845844
frbrtype5
newrecords20190724
languageeng
topicSciences (General)
collection
0PNAS (National Academy of Sciences)
1National Academy of Sciences (U.S.)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Anish Mitra
1Abraham Z. Snyder
2Tyler Blazey
3Marcus E. Raichle
jtitleProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
creationdate2015
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext_linktorsrc
addata
au
0Anish Mitra
1Abraham Z. Snyder
2Tyler Blazey
3Marcus E. Raichle
atitleLag threads organize the brain’s intrinsic activity
jtitleProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
risdate20150428
volume112
issue17
spageE2235
issn0027-8424
eissn1091-6490
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
pubNational Acad Sciences
doi10.1073/pnas.1503960112
urlhttp://www.pnas.org/content/112/17/E2235.abstract
lad01Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
pagesE2235-E2244
date2015-04-28