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Therapy of leishmaniasis: Superior efficacies of liposome-encapsulated drugs

Liposomes containing antimonial compounds trapped in the aqueous phase were tested in the treatment of experimental leishmaniasis. The rationale of this approach was based on the hypothesis that the liposomes and the parasite are taken up by the same cell, the reticuloendothelial cell, and we presen... Full description

Journal Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 01 June 1978, Vol.75(6), p.2959
Main Author: Carl R. Alving
Other Authors: Edgar A. Steck , Willie L. Chapman, Jr , Virginia B. Waits , Larry D. Hendricks , Glenn M. Swartz, Jr , William L. Hanson
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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title: Therapy of leishmaniasis: Superior efficacies of liposome-encapsulated drugs
format: Article
creator:
  • Carl R. Alving
  • Edgar A. Steck
  • Willie L. Chapman, Jr
  • Virginia B. Waits
  • Larry D. Hendricks
  • Glenn M. Swartz, Jr
  • William L. Hanson
subjects:
  • Sciences (General)
ispartof: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 01 June 1978, Vol.75(6), p.2959
description: Liposomes containing antimonial compounds trapped in the aqueous phase were tested in the treatment of experimental leishmaniasis. The rationale of this approach was based on the hypothesis that the liposomes and the parasite are taken up by the same cell, the reticuloendothelial cell, and we present electron microscopic evidence that supports this hypothesis. Suppression of leishmaniasis was quantified by determining the total number of parasites per liver from impression smears. When two antimonials, meglumine antimoniate and sodium stibogluconate, were encapsulated within liposomes, each was more than 700 times more active compared to either of the free (unencapsulated) drugs. After infection, if untreated, all of the hamsters eventually would die from the disease. Liposome-encapsulated meglumine antimoniate was about 330-640 times more effective in causing a drop in the death rate than was the free antimonial. The efficacy of treatment was influenced by the lipid composition and charge of the liposomes. For example, positively charged liposomes containing egg phosphatidylcholine were much less effective than negatively charged ones. In contrast, positively and negatively charged sphingomyelin liposomes were equally effective. Liposomes containing phosphatidylserine (which were negatively charged, but also had a much higher charge density) were among the less-effective preparations. Among those tested, the most consistently efficacious liposomes contained highly saturated long-chain phospholipids (eg., dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine), cholesterol, and a negative charge. We conclude that liposomes may be useful as carriers of drugs to treat infectious diseases involving the reticuloendothelial system. The toxicities of antimony are very similar to those of arsenic. Encapsulation of antimonial drugs and reduction of the dose required for effective therapy should minimize such systemic toxicities as acute cardiomyopathy and toxic nephritis. antimonial compounds phospholipids model membranes parasites
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 0027-8424
  • 00278424
  • 1091-6490
  • 10916490
url: Link


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titleTherapy of leishmaniasis: Superior efficacies of liposome-encapsulated drugs
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identifierISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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descriptionLiposomes containing antimonial compounds trapped in the aqueous phase were tested in the treatment of experimental leishmaniasis. The rationale of this approach was based on the hypothesis that the liposomes and the parasite are taken up by the same cell, the reticuloendothelial cell, and we present electron microscopic evidence that supports this hypothesis. Suppression of leishmaniasis was quantified by determining the total number of parasites per liver from impression smears. When two antimonials, meglumine antimoniate and sodium stibogluconate, were encapsulated within liposomes, each was more than 700 times more active compared to either of the free (unencapsulated) drugs. After infection, if untreated, all of the hamsters eventually would die from the disease. Liposome-encapsulated meglumine antimoniate was about 330-640 times more effective in causing a drop in the death rate than was the free antimonial. The efficacy of treatment was influenced by the lipid composition and charge of the liposomes. For example, positively charged liposomes containing egg phosphatidylcholine were much less effective than negatively charged ones. In contrast, positively and negatively charged sphingomyelin liposomes were equally effective. Liposomes containing phosphatidylserine (which were negatively charged, but also had a much higher charge density) were among the less-effective preparations. Among those tested, the most consistently efficacious liposomes contained highly saturated long-chain phospholipids (eg., dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine), cholesterol, and a negative charge. We conclude that liposomes may be useful as carriers of drugs to treat infectious diseases involving the reticuloendothelial system. The toxicities of antimony are very similar to those of arsenic. Encapsulation of antimonial drugs and reduction of the dose required for effective therapy should minimize such systemic toxicities as acute cardiomyopathy and toxic nephritis. antimonial compounds phospholipids model membranes parasites
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titleTherapy of leishmaniasis: Superior efficacies of liposome-encapsulated drugs
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Liposomes containing antimonial compounds trapped in the aqueous phase were tested in the treatment of experimental leishmaniasis. The rationale of this approach was based on the hypothesis that the liposomes and the parasite are taken up by the same cell, the reticuloendothelial cell, and we present electron microscopic evidence that supports this hypothesis. Suppression of leishmaniasis was quantified by determining the total number of parasites per liver from impression smears. When two antimonials, meglumine antimoniate and sodium stibogluconate, were encapsulated within liposomes, each was more than 700 times more active compared to either of the free (unencapsulated) drugs. After infection, if untreated, all of the hamsters eventually would die from the disease. Liposome-encapsulated meglumine antimoniate was about 330-640 times more effective in causing a drop in the death rate than was the free antimonial. The efficacy of treatment was influenced by the lipid composition and charge of the liposomes. For example, positively charged liposomes containing egg phosphatidylcholine were much less effective than negatively charged ones. In contrast, positively and negatively charged sphingomyelin liposomes were equally effective. Liposomes containing phosphatidylserine (which were negatively charged, but also had a much higher charge density) were among the less-effective preparations. Among those tested, the most consistently efficacious liposomes contained highly saturated long-chain phospholipids (eg., dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine), cholesterol, and a negative charge. We conclude that liposomes may be useful as carriers of drugs to treat infectious diseases involving the reticuloendothelial system. The toxicities of antimony are very similar to those of arsenic. Encapsulation of antimonial drugs and reduction of the dose required for effective therapy should minimize such systemic toxicities as acute cardiomyopathy and toxic nephritis. antimonial compounds phospholipids model membranes parasites

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Liposomes containing antimonial compounds trapped in the aqueous phase were tested in the treatment of experimental leishmaniasis. The rationale of this approach was based on the hypothesis that the liposomes and the parasite are taken up by the same cell, the reticuloendothelial cell, and we present electron microscopic evidence that supports this hypothesis. Suppression of leishmaniasis was quantified by determining the total number of parasites per liver from impression smears. When two antimonials, meglumine antimoniate and sodium stibogluconate, were encapsulated within liposomes, each was more than 700 times more active compared to either of the free (unencapsulated) drugs. After infection, if untreated, all of the hamsters eventually would die from the disease. Liposome-encapsulated meglumine antimoniate was about 330-640 times more effective in causing a drop in the death rate than was the free antimonial. The efficacy of treatment was influenced by the lipid composition and charge of the liposomes. For example, positively charged liposomes containing egg phosphatidylcholine were much less effective than negatively charged ones. In contrast, positively and negatively charged sphingomyelin liposomes were equally effective. Liposomes containing phosphatidylserine (which were negatively charged, but also had a much higher charge density) were among the less-effective preparations. Among those tested, the most consistently efficacious liposomes contained highly saturated long-chain phospholipids (eg., dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine), cholesterol, and a negative charge. We conclude that liposomes may be useful as carriers of drugs to treat infectious diseases involving the reticuloendothelial system. The toxicities of antimony are very similar to those of arsenic. Encapsulation of antimonial drugs and reduction of the dose required for effective therapy should minimize such systemic toxicities as acute cardiomyopathy and toxic nephritis. antimonial compounds phospholipids model membranes parasites

pubNational Acad Sciences
urlhttp://www.pnas.org/content/75/6/2959.abstract
lad01Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
doi10.1073/pnas.75.6.2959
pages2959-2963
date1978-06-01