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The dynamic dialogue between cells and matrices: Implications of fibronectin’s elasticity

The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides vital structure and organization to all metazoans, but it is far from an inanimate, unchanging assemblage of collagens, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins. ECM undergoes constant remodeling, most obviously during development, wound healing, and other repair proc... Full description

Journal Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 16 March 1999, Vol.96(6), p.2588
Main Author: Richard O. Hynes
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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recordid: pnas_s96_6_2588
title: The dynamic dialogue between cells and matrices: Implications of fibronectin’s elasticity
format: Article
creator:
  • Richard O. Hynes
subjects:
  • Sciences (General)
ispartof: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 16 March 1999, Vol.96(6), p.2588
description: The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides vital structure and organization to all metazoans, but it is far from an inanimate, unchanging assemblage of collagens, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins. ECM undergoes constant remodeling, most obviously during development, wound healing, and other repair processes. Defects in regulation of the deposition and turnover of ECM play important roles in pathological processes such as osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, arthritis, and fibrotic diseases. The deposition and remodeling of ECM is accomplished by cells, and the paper of Ohashi et al. in a recent issue of the Proceedings (1) provides some of the first observations of these processes in real time in living cell cultures. Ohashi et al. transfected cells with a chimera of green fluorescent protein and fibronectin (FN). FN is a prominent constituent of ECM around and beneath many cells, and FN-rich matrices provide substrates for cell adhesion and migration during development, wound healing, and other situations, as well as affecting many cellular functions including proliferation, survival, and differentiation (2). Ohashi et al. show that the FN–GFP chimera assembles into the FN-rich matrix surrounding their transfected cells, and they then use fluorescence microscopy to observe alterations in that matrix over time. This approach offers many opportunities for future research, but the observations they report already reveal some intriguing features that have implications not only for ECM structure and function but more widely in cell adhesion and beyond.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 0027-8424
  • 00278424
  • 1091-6490
  • 10916490
url: Link


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descriptionThe extracellular matrix (ECM) provides vital structure and organization to all metazoans, but it is far from an inanimate, unchanging assemblage of collagens, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins. ECM undergoes constant remodeling, most obviously during development, wound healing, and other repair processes. Defects in regulation of the deposition and turnover of ECM play important roles in pathological processes such as osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, arthritis, and fibrotic diseases. The deposition and remodeling of ECM is accomplished by cells, and the paper of Ohashi et al. in a recent issue of the Proceedings (1) provides some of the first observations of these processes in real time in living cell cultures. Ohashi et al. transfected cells with a chimera of green fluorescent protein and fibronectin (FN). FN is a prominent constituent of ECM around and beneath many cells, and FN-rich matrices provide substrates for cell adhesion and migration during development, wound healing, and other situations, as well as affecting many cellular functions including proliferation, survival, and differentiation (2). Ohashi et al. show that the FN–GFP chimera assembles into the FN-rich matrix surrounding their transfected cells, and they then use fluorescence microscopy to observe alterations in that matrix over time. This approach offers many opportunities for future research, but the observations they report already reveal some intriguing features that have implications not only for ECM structure and function but more widely in cell adhesion and beyond.
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