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Conservation of early odontogenic signaling pathways in Aves

Teeth have been missing from birds ( Aves ) for at least 60 million years. However, in the chick oral cavity a rudiment forms that resembles the lamina stage of the mammalian molar tooth germ. We have addressed the molecular basis for this secondary loss of tooth formation in Aves by analyzing in ch... Full description

Journal Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 29 August 2000, Vol.97(18), p.10044
Main Author: Yiping Chen
Other Authors: Yanding Zhang , Ting-Xing Jiang , Amanda J. Barlow , Tara R. St. Amand , Yueping Hu , Shaun Heaney , Philippa Francis-West , Cheng-Ming Chuong , Richard Maas
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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recordid: pnas_s97_18_10044
title: Conservation of early odontogenic signaling pathways in Aves
format: Article
creator:
  • Yiping Chen
  • Yanding Zhang
  • Ting-Xing Jiang
  • Amanda J. Barlow
  • Tara R. St. Amand
  • Yueping Hu
  • Shaun Heaney
  • Philippa Francis-West
  • Cheng-Ming Chuong
  • Richard Maas
subjects:
  • Sciences (General)
ispartof: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 29 August 2000, Vol.97(18), p.10044
description: Teeth have been missing from birds ( Aves ) for at least 60 million years. However, in the chick oral cavity a rudiment forms that resembles the lamina stage of the mammalian molar tooth germ. We have addressed the molecular basis for this secondary loss of tooth formation in Aves by analyzing in chick embryos the status of molecular pathways known to regulate mouse tooth development. Similar to the mouse dental lamina, expression of Fgf8, Pitx2, Barx1 , and Pax9 defines a potential chick odontogenic region. However, the expression of three molecules involved in tooth initiation, Bmp4 , Msx1 , and Msx2 , are absent from the presumptive chick dental lamina. In chick mandibles, exogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) induces Msx expression and together with fibroblast growth factor promotes the development of Sonic hedgehog expressing epithelial structures. Distinct epithelial appendages also were induced when chick mandibular epithelium was recombined with a tissue source of BMPs and fibroblast growth factors, chick skin mesenchyme. These results show that, although latent, the early signaling pathways involved in odontogenesis remain inducible in Aves and suggest that loss of odontogenic Bmp4 expression may be responsible for the early arrest of tooth development in living birds.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424 ; E-ISSN: 1091-6490
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 0027-8424
  • 00278424
  • 1091-6490
  • 10916490
url: Link


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titleConservation of early odontogenic signaling pathways in Aves
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descriptionTeeth have been missing from birds ( Aves ) for at least 60 million years. However, in the chick oral cavity a rudiment forms that resembles the lamina stage of the mammalian molar tooth germ. We have addressed the molecular basis for this secondary loss of tooth formation in Aves by analyzing in chick embryos the status of molecular pathways known to regulate mouse tooth development. Similar to the mouse dental lamina, expression of Fgf8, Pitx2, Barx1 , and Pax9 defines a potential chick odontogenic region. However, the expression of three molecules involved in tooth initiation, Bmp4 , Msx1 , and Msx2 , are absent from the presumptive chick dental lamina. In chick mandibles, exogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) induces Msx expression and together with fibroblast growth factor promotes the development of Sonic hedgehog expressing epithelial structures. Distinct epithelial appendages also were induced when chick mandibular epithelium was recombined with a tissue source of BMPs and fibroblast growth factors, chick skin mesenchyme. These results show that, although latent, the early signaling pathways involved in odontogenesis remain inducible in Aves and suggest that loss of odontogenic Bmp4 expression may be responsible for the early arrest of tooth development in living birds.
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titleConservation of early odontogenic signaling pathways in Aves
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Teeth have been missing from birds ( Aves ) for at least 60 million years. However, in the chick oral cavity a rudiment forms that resembles the lamina stage of the mammalian molar tooth germ. We have addressed the molecular basis for this secondary loss of tooth formation in Aves by analyzing in chick embryos the status of molecular pathways known to regulate mouse tooth development. Similar to the mouse dental lamina, expression of Fgf8, Pitx2, Barx1 , and Pax9 defines a potential chick odontogenic region. However, the expression of three molecules involved in tooth initiation, Bmp4 , Msx1 , and Msx2 , are absent from the presumptive chick dental lamina. In chick mandibles, exogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) induces Msx expression and together with fibroblast growth factor promotes the development of Sonic hedgehog expressing epithelial structures. Distinct epithelial appendages also were induced when chick mandibular epithelium was recombined with a tissue source of BMPs and fibroblast growth factors, chick skin mesenchyme. These results show that, although latent, the early signaling pathways involved in odontogenesis remain inducible in Aves and suggest that loss of odontogenic Bmp4 expression may be responsible for the early arrest of tooth development in living birds.

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Teeth have been missing from birds ( Aves ) for at least 60 million years. However, in the chick oral cavity a rudiment forms that resembles the lamina stage of the mammalian molar tooth germ. We have addressed the molecular basis for this secondary loss of tooth formation in Aves by analyzing in chick embryos the status of molecular pathways known to regulate mouse tooth development. Similar to the mouse dental lamina, expression of Fgf8, Pitx2, Barx1 , and Pax9 defines a potential chick odontogenic region. However, the expression of three molecules involved in tooth initiation, Bmp4 , Msx1 , and Msx2 , are absent from the presumptive chick dental lamina. In chick mandibles, exogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) induces Msx expression and together with fibroblast growth factor promotes the development of Sonic hedgehog expressing epithelial structures. Distinct epithelial appendages also were induced when chick mandibular epithelium was recombined with a tissue source of BMPs and fibroblast growth factors, chick skin mesenchyme. These results show that, although latent, the early signaling pathways involved in odontogenesis remain inducible in Aves and suggest that loss of odontogenic Bmp4 expression may be responsible for the early arrest of tooth development in living birds.

pubNational Acad Sciences
urlhttp://www.pnas.org/content/97/18/10044.abstract
lad01Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
pages10044-10049
doi10.1073/pnas.160245097
date2000-08-29