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Promoting student metacognition.

The importance of metacognition in the process of learning is an old idea that can be traced from Socrates' questioning methods to Dewey's twentieth-century stance that one learns more from reflecting on one's experiences than from the actual experiences themselves (Dewey, 1933). What is more recent... Full description

Journal Title: CBE life sciences education 2012, Vol.11(2), pp.113-120
Main Author: Tanner, Kimberly D
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1931-7913 ; DOI: 10.1187/cbe.12-03-0033
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1018863328/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest1018863328
title: Promoting student metacognition.
format: Article
creator:
  • Tanner, Kimberly D
subjects:
  • Biology–Education
  • Cognition–Physiology
  • Curriculum–Physiology
  • Humans–Psychology
  • Learning–Methods
  • Students–Methods
  • Teaching–Methods
ispartof: CBE life sciences education, 2012, Vol.11(2), pp.113-120
description: The importance of metacognition in the process of learning is an old idea that can be traced from Socrates' questioning methods to Dewey's twentieth-century stance that one learns more from reflecting on one's experiences than from the actual experiences themselves (Dewey, 1933). What is more recent is the coining of the term "metacognition" and the emergence of a metacognition research field in the last four decades. Credited to developmental psychologist John Flavell in a publication from the 1970s, metacognition is used in different disciplines in different ways, and a common, succinct definition appears to be elusive in the literature. So, how can biology educators use what is currently known about metacognition to their and their students' advantage to support biology teaching and learning? What could integrating student metacognition into a college biology course look like? And how might active learning look different with more emphasis on metacognition? Teaching students to use metacognition to understand how they are thinking about biology provides an important step on the path to thinking like a biologist (AAAS, 2011). In the context of undergraduate biology teaching, this need not take much time, and it is an effort that is in the service of learners and learning, as well as teachers and teaching. This article provides examples of self-questions that metacognitive undergraduate biology learners might ask in the process of planning, monitoring, and evaluating their learning in the context of a single class session, a homework assignment, an exam, or an entire course. It also discusses how these student self-questions can be explicitly used in teaching a biology course. (Contains 3 tables.)
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1931-7913 ; DOI: 10.1187/cbe.12-03-0033
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19317913
  • 1931-7913
url: Link


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