schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI.

To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.09.058 Byline: Denis Le Bihan Keywords: Diffusion MRI; fMRI; IVIM; Brain function Abstract: Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has... Full description

Journal Title: NeuroImage August 15, 2012, Vol.62(2), pp.1131-1136
Main Author: Le Bihan, Denis
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1095-9572 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.09.058
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1023295776/?pq-origsite=primo
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: proquest1023295776
title: Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI.
format: Article
creator:
  • Le Bihan, Denis
subjects:
  • Brain–Blood Supply
  • Brain Mapping–Physiology
  • Cerebrovascular Circulation–History
  • History, 20th Century–Methods
  • History, 21st Century–Physiology
  • Humans–History
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Methods
ispartof: NeuroImage, August 15, 2012, Vol.62(2), pp.1131-1136
description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.09.058 Byline: Denis Le Bihan Keywords: Diffusion MRI; fMRI; IVIM; Brain function Abstract: Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This "DfMRI" signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. Article History: Accepted 23 September 2011
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1095-9572 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.09.058
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 10959572
  • 1095-9572
url: Link


@attributes
ID716877626
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid1023295776
sourceidproquest
recordidTN_proquest1023295776
sourcesystemOther
pqid1023295776
galeid294939926
display
typearticle
titleDiffusion, confusion and functional MRI.
creatorLe Bihan, Denis
contributorLe Bihan, Denis (correspondence author) ; Le Bihan, Denis (record owner)
ispartofNeuroImage, August 15, 2012, Vol.62(2), pp.1131-1136
identifierE-ISSN: 1095-9572 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.09.058
subjectBrain–Blood Supply ; Brain Mapping–Physiology ; Cerebrovascular Circulation–History ; History, 20th Century–Methods ; History, 21st Century–Physiology ; Humans–History ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Methods
languageeng
source
descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.09.058 Byline: Denis Le Bihan Keywords: Diffusion MRI; fMRI; IVIM; Brain function Abstract: Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This "DfMRI" signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. Article History: Accepted 23 September 2011
version8
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
backlink$$Uhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1023295776/?pq-origsite=primo$$EView_record_in_ProQuest_(subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontribLe Bihan, Denis
titleDiffusion, confusion and functional MRI.
subject
0Brain–Blood Supply
1Brain Mapping–Physiology
2Cerebrovascular Circulation–History
3History, 20th Century–Methods
4History, 21st Century–Physiology
5Humans–History
6Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Methods
general
0English
110.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.09.058
2MEDLINE (ProQuest)
3ProQuest Biological Science Collection
4ProQuest Natural Science Collection
5ProQuest SciTech Collection
6Biological Science Database
7Natural Science Collection
8SciTech Premium Collection
9Health Research Premium Collection
10Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
11Biological Science Index (ProQuest)
sourceidproquest
recordidproquest1023295776
issn
010959572
11095-9572
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2012
addtitleNeuroImage
searchscope
01007527
11007944
21009130
310000004
410000038
510000050
610000120
710000159
810000238
910000253
1010000260
1110000270
1210000271
1310000302
1410000350
15proquest
scope
01007527
11007944
21009130
310000004
410000038
510000050
610000120
710000159
810000238
910000253
1010000260
1110000270
1210000271
1310000302
1410000350
15proquest
lsr43
01007527false
11007944false
21009130false
310000004false
410000038false
510000050false
610000120false
710000159false
810000238false
910000253false
1010000260false
1110000270false
1210000271false
1310000302false
1410000350false
contributorLe Bihan, Denis
startdate20120815
enddate20120815
citationpf 1131 pt 1136 vol 62 issue 2
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[description, pqid, galeid, issn]
sort
titleDiffusion, confusion and functional MRI.
authorLe Bihan, Denis
creationdate20120815
lso0120120815
facets
frbrgroupid7193507153105307619
frbrtype5
newrecords20181218
languageeng
creationdate2012
topic
0Brain–Blood Supply
1Brain Mapping–Physiology
2Cerebrovascular Circulation–History
3History, 20th Century–Methods
4History, 21st Century–Physiology
5Humans–History
6Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Methods
collection
0MEDLINE (ProQuest)
1ProQuest Biological Science Collection
2ProQuest Natural Science Collection
3ProQuest SciTech Collection
4Biological Science Database
5Natural Science Collection
6SciTech Premium Collection
7Health Research Premium Collection
8Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
9Biological Science Index (ProQuest)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontribLe Bihan, Denis
jtitleNeuroImage
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulastLe Bihan
aufirstDenis
auLe Bihan, Denis
addauLe Bihan, Denis
atitleDiffusion, confusion and functional MRI.
jtitleNeuroImage
risdate20120815
volume62
issue2
spage1131
epage1136
pages1131-1136
eissn1095-9572
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.09.058
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1023295776/
issn10538119
date2012-08-15