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Subjective social status and psychosocial and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

Subjective social status has been shown to be inversely associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, independent of objective social status. However, few studies have examined this association among African Americans and the results have been mixed. Additionally, the influence of discrimina... Full description

Journal Title: Social Science & Medicine April 2012, Vol.74(8), pp.1146-1154
Main Author: Subramanyam, Malavika
Other Authors: Diez-Roux, Ana , Hickson, Demarc , Sarpong, Daniel , Sims, Mario , Taylor, Herman , Williams, David , Wyatt, Sharon
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0277-9536 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.12.042
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1081869922/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Subjective social status and psychosocial and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study
format: Article
creator:
  • Subramanyam, Malavika
  • Diez-Roux, Ana
  • Hickson, Demarc
  • Sarpong, Daniel
  • Sims, Mario
  • Taylor, Herman
  • Williams, David
  • Wyatt, Sharon
subjects:
  • Social Status
  • Black Americans
  • Depression (Psychology)
  • Discrimination
  • Resistance
  • Stress
  • Racism
  • Heart Diseases
  • Family
  • Sociology of Health and Medicine
  • Sociology of Medicine & Health Care
  • USA African American Subjective Social Status Cardiovascular Risk Factors
  • Article
ispartof: Social Science & Medicine, April 2012, Vol.74(8), pp.1146-1154
description: Subjective social status has been shown to be inversely associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, independent of objective social status. However, few studies have examined this association among African Americans and the results have been mixed. Additionally, the influence of discrimination on this relationship has not been explored. Using baseline data (2000-2004) from the Jackson Heart Study, an African American cohort from the U.S. South (N = 5301), we quantified the association of subjective social status with selected cardiovascular risk factors: depressive symptoms, perceived stress, waist circumference, insulin resistance and prevalence of diabetes. We contrasted the strength of the associations of these outcomes with subjective versus objective social status and examined whether perceived discrimination confounded or modified these associations. Subjective social status was measured using two 10-rung "ladders," using the U.S. and the community as referent groups. Objective social status was measured using annual family income and years of schooling completed. Gender-specific multivariable linear and logistic regression models were fit to examine associations. Subjective and objective measures were weakly positively correlated. Independent of objective measures, subjective social status was significantly inversely associated with depressive symptoms (men and women) and insulin resistance (women). The associations of subjective social status with the outcomes were modest and generally similar to the objective measures. We did not find evidence that perceived racial discrimination strongly confounded or modified the association of subjective social status with the outcomes. Subjective social status was related to depressive symptoms but not consistently to stress or metabolic risk factors in African Americans. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0277-9536 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.12.042
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 02779536
  • 0277-9536
url: Link


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titleSubjective social status and psychosocial and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study
creatorSubramanyam, Malavika ; Diez-Roux, Ana ; Hickson, Demarc ; Sarpong, Daniel ; Sims, Mario ; Taylor, Herman ; Williams, David ; Wyatt, Sharon
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identifierISSN: 0277-9536 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.12.042
subjectSocial Status ; Black Americans ; Depression (Psychology) ; Discrimination ; Resistance ; Stress ; Racism ; Heart Diseases ; Family ; Sociology of Health and Medicine; Sociology of Medicine & Health Care ; USA African American Subjective Social Status Cardiovascular Risk Factors ; Article
descriptionSubjective social status has been shown to be inversely associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, independent of objective social status. However, few studies have examined this association among African Americans and the results have been mixed. Additionally, the influence of discrimination on this relationship has not been explored. Using baseline data (2000-2004) from the Jackson Heart Study, an African American cohort from the U.S. South (N = 5301), we quantified the association of subjective social status with selected cardiovascular risk factors: depressive symptoms, perceived stress, waist circumference, insulin resistance and prevalence of diabetes. We contrasted the strength of the associations of these outcomes with subjective versus objective social status and examined whether perceived discrimination confounded or modified these associations. Subjective social status was measured using two 10-rung "ladders," using the U.S. and the community as referent groups. Objective social status was measured using annual family income and years of schooling completed. Gender-specific multivariable linear and logistic regression models were fit to examine associations. Subjective and objective measures were weakly positively correlated. Independent of objective measures, subjective social status was significantly inversely associated with depressive symptoms (men and women) and insulin resistance (women). The associations of subjective social status with the outcomes were modest and generally similar to the objective measures. We did not find evidence that perceived racial discrimination strongly confounded or modified the association of subjective social status with the outcomes. Subjective social status was related to depressive symptoms but not consistently to stress or metabolic risk factors in African Americans. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
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titleSubjective social status and psychosocial and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study
descriptionSubjective social status has been shown to be inversely associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, independent of objective social status. However, few studies have examined this association among African Americans and the results have been mixed. Additionally, the influence of discrimination on this relationship has not been explored. Using baseline data (2000-2004) from the Jackson Heart Study, an African American cohort from the U.S. South (N = 5301), we quantified the association of subjective social status with selected cardiovascular risk factors: depressive symptoms, perceived stress, waist circumference, insulin resistance and prevalence of diabetes. We contrasted the strength of the associations of these outcomes with subjective versus objective social status and examined whether perceived discrimination confounded or modified these associations. Subjective social status was measured using two 10-rung "ladders," using the U.S. and the community as referent groups. Objective social status was measured using annual family income and years of schooling completed. Gender-specific multivariable linear and logistic regression models were fit to examine associations. Subjective and objective measures were weakly positively correlated. Independent of objective measures, subjective social status was significantly inversely associated with depressive symptoms (men and women) and insulin resistance (women). The associations of subjective social status with the outcomes were modest and generally similar to the objective measures. We did not find evidence that perceived racial discrimination strongly confounded or modified the association of subjective social status with the outcomes. Subjective social status was related to depressive symptoms but not consistently to stress or metabolic risk factors in African Americans. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
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abstractSubjective social status has been shown to be inversely associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, independent of objective social status. However, few studies have examined this association among African Americans and the results have been mixed. Additionally, the influence of discrimination on this relationship has not been explored. Using baseline data (2000-2004) from the Jackson Heart Study, an African American cohort from the U.S. South (N = 5301), we quantified the association of subjective social status with selected cardiovascular risk factors: depressive symptoms, perceived stress, waist circumference, insulin resistance and prevalence of diabetes. We contrasted the strength of the associations of these outcomes with subjective versus objective social status and examined whether perceived discrimination confounded or modified these associations. Subjective social status was measured using two 10-rung "ladders," using the U.S. and the community as referent groups. Objective social status was measured using annual family income and years of schooling completed. Gender-specific multivariable linear and logistic regression models were fit to examine associations. Subjective and objective measures were weakly positively correlated. Independent of objective measures, subjective social status was significantly inversely associated with depressive symptoms (men and women) and insulin resistance (women). The associations of subjective social status with the outcomes were modest and generally similar to the objective measures. We did not find evidence that perceived racial discrimination strongly confounded or modified the association of subjective social status with the outcomes. Subjective social status was related to depressive symptoms but not consistently to stress or metabolic risk factors in African Americans. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
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