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The Balkan revolutionary age

In assessing the broad sweep of the "Age of Revolution" (1789-1848), the Ottoman Balkans offer the most significant resource yet to be tapped meaningfully by historians of modern Europe. The continent's southeast is rarely mentioned in accounts of the era except as a somnolent Ruritania still in the... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of modern history Sep 2012, Vol.84(3), pp.572-606
Main Author: Anscombe, Frederick
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0022-2801
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1267029694/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest1267029694
title: The Balkan revolutionary age
format: Article
creator:
  • Anscombe, Frederick
subjects:
  • Political History
  • Ottoman Empire
  • Regional History
  • Revolution
  • Political Conditions
  • Modern History
  • Imperialism
  • Nationalism
  • Southeast Europe
  • Anthropology
  • Political Science
ispartof: Journal of modern history, Sep 2012, Vol.84(3), pp.572-606
description: In assessing the broad sweep of the "Age of Revolution" (1789-1848), the Ottoman Balkans offer the most significant resource yet to be tapped meaningfully by historians of modern Europe. The continent's southeast is rarely mentioned in accounts of the era except as a somnolent Ruritania still in the crumbling grip of its sclerotic imperial master, whose decadent rule encouraged the emergence of the region as Europe's cockpit of nationalism. The "Serbian" (1804) and "Greek" (1821) revolts invariably illustrate this picture of the Balkan backwater. When examined more closely, however, the Balkans reveal almost unremitting unrest from the 1790s through the 1830s. This turmoi affected Muslims as well as Christians, and it resulted not from nationalism but from pressures within Ottoman society created by state self-strengthening efforts. Adapted from the source document. Reprinted by permission of the University of Chicago Press. © All rights reserved
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-2801
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00222801
  • 0022-2801
url: Link


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subjectPolitical History ; Ottoman Empire ; Regional History ; Revolution ; Political Conditions ; Modern History ; Imperialism ; Nationalism ; Southeast Europe ; Anthropology ; Political Science
descriptionIn assessing the broad sweep of the "Age of Revolution" (1789-1848), the Ottoman Balkans offer the most significant resource yet to be tapped meaningfully by historians of modern Europe. The continent's southeast is rarely mentioned in accounts of the era except as a somnolent Ruritania still in the crumbling grip of its sclerotic imperial master, whose decadent rule encouraged the emergence of the region as Europe's cockpit of nationalism. The "Serbian" (1804) and "Greek" (1821) revolts invariably illustrate this picture of the Balkan backwater. When examined more closely, however, the Balkans reveal almost unremitting unrest from the 1790s through the 1830s. This turmoi affected Muslims as well as Christians, and it resulted not from nationalism but from pressures within Ottoman society created by state self-strengthening efforts. Adapted from the source document. Reprinted by permission of the University of Chicago Press. © All rights reserved
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abstractIn assessing the broad sweep of the "Age of Revolution" (1789-1848), the Ottoman Balkans offer the most significant resource yet to be tapped meaningfully by historians of modern Europe. The continent's southeast is rarely mentioned in accounts of the era except as a somnolent Ruritania still in the crumbling grip of its sclerotic imperial master, whose decadent rule encouraged the emergence of the region as Europe's cockpit of nationalism. The "Serbian" (1804) and "Greek" (1821) revolts invariably illustrate this picture of the Balkan backwater. When examined more closely, however, the Balkans reveal almost unremitting unrest from the 1790s through the 1830s. This turmoi affected Muslims as well as Christians, and it resulted not from nationalism but from pressures within Ottoman society created by state self-strengthening efforts. Adapted from the source document. Reprinted by permission of the University of Chicago Press. © All rights reserved
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date2012-09-01