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Focusing the HIV response through estimating the major modes of HIV transmission: a multi-country analysis.

OBJECTIVEAn increasing number of countries have been estimating the distribution of new adult HIV infections by modes of transmission (MOT) to help prioritise prevention efforts. We compare results from studies conducted between 2008 and 2012 and discuss their use for planning and responding to the... Full description

Journal Title: Sexually transmitted infections December 2012, Vol.88 Suppl 2, pp.i76-i85
Main Author: Gouws, Eleanor
Other Authors: Cuchi, Paloma , Gouws, Eleanor
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1472-3263 ; DOI: 1472-3263 ; DOI: 10.1136/sextrans-2012-050719
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1273477862/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Focusing the HIV response through estimating the major modes of HIV transmission: a multi-country analysis.
format: Article
creator:
  • Gouws, Eleanor
  • Cuchi, Paloma
  • Gouws, Eleanor
subjects:
  • Adolescent–Epidemiology
  • Adult–Prevention & Control
  • Africa South of the Sahara–Transmission
  • Epidemiologic Methods–Transmission
  • Female–Transmission
  • Global Health–Transmission
  • HIV Infections–Transmission
  • Humans–Transmission
  • Male–Transmission
  • Middle Aged–Transmission
  • Sexual Behavior–Transmission
  • Young Adult–Transmission
ispartof: Sexually transmitted infections, December 2012, Vol.88 Suppl 2, pp.i76-i85
description: OBJECTIVEAn increasing number of countries have been estimating the distribution of new adult HIV infections by modes of transmission (MOT) to help prioritise prevention efforts. We compare results from studies conducted between 2008 and 2012 and discuss their use for planning and responding to the HIV epidemic. METHODSThe UNAIDS recommended MOT model helps countries to estimate the proportion of new HIV infections that occur through key transmission modes including sex work, injecting drug use (IDU), men having sex with men (MSM), multiple sexual partnerships, stable relationships and medical interventions. The model typically forms part of a country-led process that includes a comprehensive review of epidemiological data. Recent revisions to the model are described. RESULTSModelling results from 25 countries show large variation between and within regions. In sub-Saharan Africa, new infections occur largely in the general heterosexual population because of multiple partnerships or in stable discordant relationships, while sex work contributes significantly to new infections in West Africa. IDU and sex work are the main contributors to new infections in the Middle East and North Africa, with MSM the main contributor in Latin America. Patterns vary substantially between countries in Eastern Europe and Asia in terms of the relative contribution of sex work, MSM, IDU and spousal transmission. CONCLUSIONSThe MOT modelling results, comprehensive review and critical assessment of data in a country can contribute to a more strategically focused HIV response. To strengthen this type of research, improved epidemiological and behavioural data by risk population are needed.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1472-3263 ; DOI: 1472-3263 ; DOI: 10.1136/sextrans-2012-050719
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 14723263
  • 1472-3263
url: Link


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titleFocusing the HIV response through estimating the major modes of HIV transmission: a multi-country analysis.
creatorGouws, Eleanor ; Cuchi, Paloma ; Gouws, Eleanor
contributorGouws, Eleanor (correspondence author) ; Cuchi, Paloma (record owner) ; Ghys, Peter ; Gobet, Benjamin ; Reddy, Amala ; Brown, Tim ; Loo, Virginia ; Peerapatanapokin, Wiwat ; Saidel, Tobi ; Siripong, Nalyn ; Sein, Aye Aye ; Hone, San ; Aye, Khin Zarli ; Bühler, Markus ; Samonte, Genesis ; Palaypayon, Noel ; Mosende, Zimmbodilion Y ; Kurniawan, Asep ; Indrawati, Victoria ; Indrasari, Wenita ; Hidayat, Asep Eka Nur ; Wahyuniar, Lely ; Karki, Deepak ; Poudyal, Amdo Kumar ; Malviya, Alankar ; Zohrabyan, Lev ; Case, Kelsey ; Scutelniciuc, Otilia ; Plesca, Valeriu ; Bivol, Stela ; Iovita, Alexandrina ; Grigoryan, Samvel ; Papoyan, Arshak ; Jacobs, Marjolein ; Borquez, Annick ; Vesga, Juan F ; Doloros, Yordana ; Vaillant, Tessie Caballero ; Conklin-Ballester, Elizabeth ; Nieto, Ana Isabel ; Sorto, José Salvador ; Betancourt, Herbert ; Martinez, Marta Aurelia ; Alarcon, Jorge ; Pun, Monica ; Suarez, Luis ; Tejada, Romina ; Gutierrez, Cesar ; St Charles, Otilia ; Hernandez, Rosalinda ; Acevedo, Enrique Beteta ; Palma, Luis Carballo ; Medrano, José ; Soza, Dina ; Chicas, Ofelia ; Setayesh, Hamidreza ; Abu-Raddad, Laith ; Mumtaz, Ghina R ; Zidouh, Ahmed ; El-Rhilani, Houssine ; Bennani, Aziza ; Alami, Kamal ; Nasirian, Maryam ; Haghdoost, Aliakbar ; Doroudi, Fardad ; Kasedde, Susan ; Colvin, Mark ; Stover, John ; Fraser, Nicole ; Gelmon, Lawrence ; Kenya, Patrick ; Oguya, Francis ; Cheluget, Boaz ; Haile, Girmay ; Khobotlo, Motlalepula ; Tshehlo, Relebohile ; Nkonyama, John ; Hildrebrand, Mikaela ; Cysne, Mauricio ; Luntamo, Mari ; Kassanjee, Reshma ; Welte, Alex ; Damisoni, Henry ; Mngani, Sibusiso ; Mkhatshwa, Happiness ; Lapidos, Tyrone ; Khumalo, Thandi ; Tsela, Sanelisiwe ; Nhlabatsi, Nhlanhla ; Odido, Helen ; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred ; Odiit, Martin ; Kirungi, Wilfred ; Kisitu, David Kaweesa ; Wanyama, James Okara ; Witola, Harold ; Buyu, Celestine ; Gboun, Michael ; Mpofu, Nomasomi ; James, Victoria ; Milanzi, Amos ; Nzima, Masauso ; Assani, Alliou ; Stover, John ; Borquez, Annick ; Lowndes, Catherine ; Alary, Michel ; Victor-Ahuchogu, Juliana ; Guedeme, Alphonse ; Ekanmian, Gatien ; Toussou, Justin ; Kintin, Frederic ; Kaboré, André ; Gatali, Jean-Baptiste ; Seck, Karim ; Eba, Eugene ; Eby, Pascal ; Bosu, William ; Zeboah, Kenneth ; Gurumurthy, Rangaiyan ; Nnorom, Joseph ; Oluwole, Fajemisin ; Sagbohan, Job ; Seck, Karim ; Seck, Karim ; Seck, Karim
ispartofSexually transmitted infections, December 2012, Vol.88 Suppl 2, pp.i76-i85
identifier
subjectAdolescent–Epidemiology ; Adult–Prevention & Control ; Africa South of the Sahara–Transmission ; Epidemiologic Methods–Transmission ; Female–Transmission ; Global Health–Transmission ; HIV Infections–Transmission ; Humans–Transmission ; Male–Transmission ; Middle Aged–Transmission ; Sexual Behavior–Transmission ; Young Adult–Transmission
descriptionOBJECTIVEAn increasing number of countries have been estimating the distribution of new adult HIV infections by modes of transmission (MOT) to help prioritise prevention efforts. We compare results from studies conducted between 2008 and 2012 and discuss their use for planning and responding to the HIV epidemic. METHODSThe UNAIDS recommended MOT model helps countries to estimate the proportion of new HIV infections that occur through key transmission modes including sex work, injecting drug use (IDU), men having sex with men (MSM), multiple sexual partnerships, stable relationships and medical interventions. The model typically forms part of a country-led process that includes a comprehensive review of epidemiological data. Recent revisions to the model are described. RESULTSModelling results from 25 countries show large variation between and within regions. In sub-Saharan Africa, new infections occur largely in the general heterosexual population because of multiple partnerships or in stable discordant relationships, while sex work contributes significantly to new infections in West Africa. IDU and sex work are the main contributors to new infections in the Middle East and North Africa, with MSM the main contributor in Latin America. Patterns vary substantially between countries in Eastern Europe and Asia in terms of the relative contribution of sex work, MSM, IDU and spousal transmission. CONCLUSIONSThe MOT modelling results, comprehensive review and critical assessment of data in a country can contribute to a more strategically focused HIV response. To strengthen this type of research, improved epidemiological and behavioural data by risk population are needed.
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titleFocusing the HIV response through estimating the major modes of HIV transmission: a multi-country analysis.
descriptionOBJECTIVEAn increasing number of countries have been estimating the distribution of new adult HIV infections by modes of transmission (MOT) to help prioritise prevention efforts. We compare results from studies conducted between 2008 and 2012 and discuss their use for planning and responding to the HIV epidemic. METHODSThe UNAIDS recommended MOT model helps countries to estimate the proportion of new HIV infections that occur through key transmission modes including sex work, injecting drug use (IDU), men having sex with men (MSM), multiple sexual partnerships, stable relationships and medical interventions. The model typically forms part of a country-led process that includes a comprehensive review of epidemiological data. Recent revisions to the model are described. RESULTSModelling results from 25 countries show large variation between and within regions. In sub-Saharan Africa, new infections occur largely in the general heterosexual population because of multiple partnerships or in stable discordant relationships, while sex work contributes significantly to new infections in West Africa. IDU and sex work are the main contributors to new infections in the Middle East and North Africa, with MSM the main contributor in Latin America. Patterns vary substantially between countries in Eastern Europe and Asia in terms of the relative contribution of sex work, MSM, IDU and spousal transmission. CONCLUSIONSThe MOT modelling results, comprehensive review and critical assessment of data in a country can contribute to a more strategically focused HIV response. To strengthen this type of research, improved epidemiological and behavioural data by risk population are needed.
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8Saidel, Tobi
9Siripong, Nalyn
10Sein, Aye Aye
11Hone, San
12Aye, Khin Zarli
13Bühler, Markus
14Samonte, Genesis
15Palaypayon, Noel
16Mosende, Zimmbodilion Y
17Kurniawan, Asep
18Indrawati, Victoria
19Indrasari, Wenita
20Hidayat, Asep Eka Nur
21Wahyuniar, Lely
22Karki, Deepak
23Poudyal, Amdo Kumar
24Malviya, Alankar
25Zohrabyan, Lev
26Case, Kelsey
27Scutelniciuc, Otilia
28Plesca, Valeriu
29Bivol, Stela
30Iovita, Alexandrina
31Grigoryan, Samvel
32Papoyan, Arshak
33Jacobs, Marjolein
34Borquez, Annick
35Vesga, Juan F
36Doloros, Yordana
37Vaillant, Tessie Caballero
38Conklin-Ballester, Elizabeth
39Nieto, Ana Isabel
40Sorto, José Salvador
41Betancourt, Herbert
42Martinez, Marta Aurelia
43Alarcon, Jorge
44Pun, Monica
45Suarez, Luis
46Tejada, Romina
47Gutierrez, Cesar
48St Charles, Otilia
49Hernandez, Rosalinda
50Acevedo, Enrique Beteta
51Palma, Luis Carballo
52Medrano, José
53Soza, Dina
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55Setayesh, Hamidreza
56Abu-Raddad, Laith
57Mumtaz, Ghina R
58Zidouh, Ahmed
59El-Rhilani, Houssine
60Bennani, Aziza
61Alami, Kamal
62Nasirian, Maryam
63Haghdoost, Aliakbar
64Doroudi, Fardad
65Kasedde, Susan
66Colvin, Mark
67Stover, John
68Fraser, Nicole
69Gelmon, Lawrence
70Kenya, Patrick
71Oguya, Francis
72Cheluget, Boaz
73Haile, Girmay
74Khobotlo, Motlalepula
75Tshehlo, Relebohile
76Nkonyama, John
77Hildrebrand, Mikaela
78Cysne, Mauricio
79Luntamo, Mari
80Kassanjee, Reshma
81Welte, Alex
82Damisoni, Henry
83Mngani, Sibusiso
84Mkhatshwa, Happiness
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86Khumalo, Thandi
87Tsela, Sanelisiwe
88Nhlabatsi, Nhlanhla
89Odido, Helen
90Wabwire-Mangen, Fred
91Odiit, Martin
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95Witola, Harold
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97Gboun, Michael
98Mpofu, Nomasomi
99James, Victoria
100...
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titleFocusing the HIV response through estimating the major modes of HIV transmission: a multi-country analysis.
authorGouws, Eleanor ; Cuchi, Paloma ; Gouws, Eleanor
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3Epidemiologic Methods–Transmission
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9Middle Aged–Transmission
10Sexual Behavior–Transmission
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8Saidel, Tobi
9Siripong, Nalyn
10Sein, Aye Aye
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12Aye, Khin Zarli
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14Samonte, Genesis
15Palaypayon, Noel
16Mosende, Zimmbodilion Y
17Kurniawan, Asep
18Indrawati, Victoria
19Indrasari, Wenita
20Hidayat, Asep Eka Nur
21Wahyuniar, Lely
22Karki, Deepak
23Poudyal, Amdo Kumar
24Malviya, Alankar
25Zohrabyan, Lev
26Case, Kelsey
27Scutelniciuc, Otilia
28Plesca, Valeriu
29Bivol, Stela
30Iovita, Alexandrina
31Grigoryan, Samvel
32Papoyan, Arshak
33Jacobs, Marjolein
34Borquez, Annick
35Vesga, Juan F
36Doloros, Yordana
37Vaillant, Tessie Caballero
38Conklin-Ballester, Elizabeth
39Nieto, Ana Isabel
40Sorto, José Salvador
41Betancourt, Herbert
42Martinez, Marta Aurelia
43Alarcon, Jorge
44Pun, Monica
45Suarez, Luis
46Tejada, Romina
47Gutierrez, Cesar
48St Charles, Otilia
49Hernandez, Rosalinda
50Acevedo, Enrique Beteta
51Palma, Luis Carballo
52Medrano, José
53Soza, Dina
54Chicas, Ofelia
55Setayesh, Hamidreza
56Abu-Raddad, Laith
57Mumtaz, Ghina R
58Zidouh, Ahmed
59El-Rhilani, Houssine
60Bennani, Aziza
61Alami, Kamal
62Nasirian, Maryam
63Haghdoost, Aliakbar
64Doroudi, Fardad
65Kasedde, Susan
66Colvin, Mark
67Stover, John
68Fraser, Nicole
69Gelmon, Lawrence
70Kenya, Patrick
71Oguya, Francis
72Cheluget, Boaz
73Haile, Girmay
74Khobotlo, Motlalepula
75Tshehlo, Relebohile
76Nkonyama, John
77Hildrebrand, Mikaela
78Cysne, Mauricio
79Luntamo, Mari
80Kassanjee, Reshma
81Welte, Alex
82Damisoni, Henry
83Mngani, Sibusiso
84Mkhatshwa, Happiness
85Lapidos, Tyrone
86Khumalo, Thandi
87Tsela, Sanelisiwe
88Nhlabatsi, Nhlanhla
89Odido, Helen
90Wabwire-Mangen, Fred
91Odiit, Martin
92Kirungi, Wilfred
93Kisitu, David Kaweesa
94Wanyama, James Okara
95Witola, Harold
96Buyu, Celestine
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12Aye, Khin Zarli
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14Samonte, Genesis
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16Mosende, Zimmbodilion Y
17Kurniawan, Asep
18Indrawati, Victoria
19Indrasari, Wenita
20Hidayat, Asep Eka Nur
21Wahyuniar, Lely
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23Poudyal, Amdo Kumar
24Malviya, Alankar
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26Case, Kelsey
27Scutelniciuc, Otilia
28Plesca, Valeriu
29Bivol, Stela
30Iovita, Alexandrina
31Grigoryan, Samvel
32Papoyan, Arshak
33Jacobs, Marjolein
34Borquez, Annick
35Vesga, Juan F
36Doloros, Yordana
37Vaillant, Tessie Caballero
38Conklin-Ballester, Elizabeth
39Nieto, Ana Isabel
40Sorto, José Salvador
41Betancourt, Herbert
42Martinez, Marta Aurelia
43Alarcon, Jorge
44Pun, Monica
45Suarez, Luis
46Tejada, Romina
47Gutierrez, Cesar
48St Charles, Otilia
49Hernandez, Rosalinda
50Acevedo, Enrique Beteta
51Palma, Luis Carballo
52Medrano, José
53Soza, Dina
54Chicas, Ofelia
55Setayesh, Hamidreza
56Abu-Raddad, Laith
57Mumtaz, Ghina R
58Zidouh, Ahmed
59El-Rhilani, Houssine
60Bennani, Aziza
61Alami, Kamal
62Nasirian, Maryam
63Haghdoost, Aliakbar
64Doroudi, Fardad
65Kasedde, Susan
66Colvin, Mark
67Stover, John
68Fraser, Nicole
69Gelmon, Lawrence
70Kenya, Patrick
71Oguya, Francis
72Cheluget, Boaz
73Haile, Girmay
74Khobotlo, Motlalepula
75Tshehlo, Relebohile
76Nkonyama, John
77Hildrebrand, Mikaela
78Cysne, Mauricio
79Luntamo, Mari
80Kassanjee, Reshma
81Welte, Alex
82Damisoni, Henry
83Mngani, Sibusiso
84Mkhatshwa, Happiness
85Lapidos, Tyrone
86Khumalo, Thandi
87Tsela, Sanelisiwe
88Nhlabatsi, Nhlanhla
89Odido, Helen
90Wabwire-Mangen, Fred
91Odiit, Martin
92Kirungi, Wilfred
93Kisitu, David Kaweesa
94Wanyama, James Okara
95Witola, Harold
96Buyu, Celestine
97Gboun, Michael
98Mpofu, Nomasomi
99James, Victoria
100...
atitleFocusing the HIV response through estimating the major modes of HIV transmission: a multi-country analysis.
jtitleSexually transmitted infections
risdate20121201
volume88
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abstractOBJECTIVEAn increasing number of countries have been estimating the distribution of new adult HIV infections by modes of transmission (MOT) to help prioritise prevention efforts. We compare results from studies conducted between 2008 and 2012 and discuss their use for planning and responding to the HIV epidemic. METHODSThe UNAIDS recommended MOT model helps countries to estimate the proportion of new HIV infections that occur through key transmission modes including sex work, injecting drug use (IDU), men having sex with men (MSM), multiple sexual partnerships, stable relationships and medical interventions. The model typically forms part of a country-led process that includes a comprehensive review of epidemiological data. Recent revisions to the model are described. RESULTSModelling results from 25 countries show large variation between and within regions. In sub-Saharan Africa, new infections occur largely in the general heterosexual population because of multiple partnerships or in stable discordant relationships, while sex work contributes significantly to new infections in West Africa. IDU and sex work are the main contributors to new infections in the Middle East and North Africa, with MSM the main contributor in Latin America. Patterns vary substantially between countries in Eastern Europe and Asia in terms of the relative contribution of sex work, MSM, IDU and spousal transmission. CONCLUSIONSThe MOT modelling results, comprehensive review and critical assessment of data in a country can contribute to a more strategically focused HIV response. To strengthen this type of research, improved epidemiological and behavioural data by risk population are needed.
doi10.1136/sextrans-2012-050719
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1273477862/
issueSuppl_2
issn13684973
date2012-12-01