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High nutritional quality is not associated with low greenhouse gas emissions in self-selected diets of French adults.

BACKGROUNDHealthy diets are supposed to be more environmentally friendly because they rely mainly on plant-based foods, which have lower greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) per unit weight than do animal-based foods. OBJECTIVESThe objectives were to estimate the GHGEs associated with the consumption of... Full description

Journal Title: The American journal of clinical nutrition March 2013, Vol.97(3), pp.569-583
Main Author: Vieux, Florent
Other Authors: Soler, Louis-Georges , Touazi, Djilali , Darmon, Nicole
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.112.035105
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1312171064/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: High nutritional quality is not associated with low greenhouse gas emissions in self-selected diets of French adults.
format: Article
creator:
  • Vieux, Florent
  • Soler, Louis-Georges
  • Touazi, Djilali
  • Darmon, Nicole
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Animals
  • Choice Behavior
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Diet
  • Energy Intake
  • European Continental Ancestry Group
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Female
  • Food Preferences
  • France
  • Fruit
  • Greenhouse Effect
  • Humans
  • Linear Models
  • Male
  • Meat
  • Middle Aged
  • Models, Theoretical
  • Nutritive Value
  • Vegetables
  • Young Adult
  • Abridged
ispartof: The American journal of clinical nutrition, March 2013, Vol.97(3), pp.569-583
description: BACKGROUNDHealthy diets are supposed to be more environmentally friendly because they rely mainly on plant-based foods, which have lower greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) per unit weight than do animal-based foods. OBJECTIVESThe objectives were to estimate the GHGEs associated with the consumption of self-selected diets in France and to analyze their relation with the nutritional quality of diets. DESIGNFor each adult in the national dietary Individual and National Survey on Food Consumption (n = 1918), the GHGEs of his or her diet were estimated based on the GHGEs of 391 foods. Highest-nutritional-quality diets were defined as those having simultaneously 1) an energy density below the median, 2) a mean adequacy ratio (MAR) above the median, and 3) a mean excess ratio (MER, percentage of maximum recommended values for nutrients for which intake should be limited) below the median. RESULTSMAR was positively correlated and MER was negatively correlated with diet-related GHGEs. High-nutritional-quality diets contained more plant-based foods, notably fruit and vegetables, and fewer sweets and salted snacks than did low-quality diets. After adjustment for age, sex, and energy intake, the consumption of sweets and salted snacks was negatively correlated with diet-related GHGEs, whereas the consumption of animal products and of fruit and vegetables was positively associated with them. After adjustment for energy intake, high-nutritional-quality diets had significantly higher GHGEs (+9% and +22% for men and women, respectively) than did low-nutritional-quality diets. CONCLUSIONDespite containing large amounts of plant-based foods, self-selected diets of the highest nutritional quality are currently not those with the lowest diet-related GHGEs.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.112.035105
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19383207
  • 1938-3207
url: Link


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titleHigh nutritional quality is not associated with low greenhouse gas emissions in self-selected diets of French adults.
creatorVieux, Florent ; Soler, Louis-Georges ; Touazi, Djilali ; Darmon, Nicole
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subjectAdult ; Aged ; Animals ; Choice Behavior ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Diet ; Energy Intake ; European Continental Ancestry Group ; Feeding Behavior ; Female ; Food Preferences ; France ; Fruit ; Greenhouse Effect ; Humans ; Linear Models ; Male ; Meat ; Middle Aged ; Models, Theoretical ; Nutritive Value ; Vegetables ; Young Adult ; Abridged
descriptionBACKGROUNDHealthy diets are supposed to be more environmentally friendly because they rely mainly on plant-based foods, which have lower greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) per unit weight than do animal-based foods. OBJECTIVESThe objectives were to estimate the GHGEs associated with the consumption of self-selected diets in France and to analyze their relation with the nutritional quality of diets. DESIGNFor each adult in the national dietary Individual and National Survey on Food Consumption (n = 1918), the GHGEs of his or her diet were estimated based on the GHGEs of 391 foods. Highest-nutritional-quality diets were defined as those having simultaneously 1) an energy density below the median, 2) a mean adequacy ratio (MAR) above the median, and 3) a mean excess ratio (MER, percentage of maximum recommended values for nutrients for which intake should be limited) below the median. RESULTSMAR was positively correlated and MER was negatively correlated with diet-related GHGEs. High-nutritional-quality diets contained more plant-based foods, notably fruit and vegetables, and fewer sweets and salted snacks than did low-quality diets. After adjustment for age, sex, and energy intake, the consumption of sweets and salted snacks was negatively correlated with diet-related GHGEs, whereas the consumption of animal products and of fruit and vegetables was positively associated with them. After adjustment for energy intake, high-nutritional-quality diets had significantly higher GHGEs (+9% and +22% for men and women, respectively) than did low-nutritional-quality diets. CONCLUSIONDespite containing large amounts of plant-based foods, self-selected diets of the highest nutritional quality are currently not those with the lowest diet-related GHGEs.
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titleHigh nutritional quality is not associated with low greenhouse gas emissions in self-selected diets of French adults.
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abstractBACKGROUNDHealthy diets are supposed to be more environmentally friendly because they rely mainly on plant-based foods, which have lower greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) per unit weight than do animal-based foods. OBJECTIVESThe objectives were to estimate the GHGEs associated with the consumption of self-selected diets in France and to analyze their relation with the nutritional quality of diets. DESIGNFor each adult in the national dietary Individual and National Survey on Food Consumption (n = 1918), the GHGEs of his or her diet were estimated based on the GHGEs of 391 foods. Highest-nutritional-quality diets were defined as those having simultaneously 1) an energy density below the median, 2) a mean adequacy ratio (MAR) above the median, and 3) a mean excess ratio (MER, percentage of maximum recommended values for nutrients for which intake should be limited) below the median. RESULTSMAR was positively correlated and MER was negatively correlated with diet-related GHGEs. High-nutritional-quality diets contained more plant-based foods, notably fruit and vegetables, and fewer sweets and salted snacks than did low-quality diets. After adjustment for age, sex, and energy intake, the consumption of sweets and salted snacks was negatively correlated with diet-related GHGEs, whereas the consumption of animal products and of fruit and vegetables was positively associated with them. After adjustment for energy intake, high-nutritional-quality diets had significantly higher GHGEs (+9% and +22% for men and women, respectively) than did low-nutritional-quality diets. CONCLUSIONDespite containing large amounts of plant-based foods, self-selected diets of the highest nutritional quality are currently not those with the lowest diet-related GHGEs.
doi10.3945/ajcn.112.035105
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issn00029165
date2013-03-01