schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Getting culture: a new path for Indonesia’s Islamist Justice and Prosperity party?

Partai Keadilan Sejahtera (PKS, The Justice and Prosperity Party) is the largest Islamist political party in Indonesia. It has roots in the religious and political and religious teachings of the Muslim Brotherhood and promotes what Oliver Roy calls "deculturized religion." The party can be understoo... Full description

Journal Title: Contemporary Islam 2013-07, Vol.7 (2), p.173-189
Main Author: Woodward, Mark
Other Authors: Amin, Ali , Rohmaniyah, Inayah , Lundry, Chris
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands
ID: ISSN: 1872-0218
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_springer_primary_2012_11562_7_2_187
title: Getting culture: a new path for Indonesia’s Islamist Justice and Prosperity party?
format: Article
creator:
  • Woodward, Mark
  • Amin, Ali
  • Rohmaniyah, Inayah
  • Lundry, Chris
subjects:
  • Anthropology
  • Culture
  • Humanities / Arts
  • Humanities, general
  • Indonesia
  • Islamic fundamentalism
  • Islamism
  • Muslim brotherhood
  • Muslims
  • Political aspects
  • Political parties
  • Political party
  • Religious Studies
  • Social Sciences, general
  • Sociology, general
ispartof: Contemporary Islam, 2013-07, Vol.7 (2), p.173-189
description: Partai Keadilan Sejahtera (PKS, The Justice and Prosperity Party) is the largest Islamist political party in Indonesia. It has roots in the religious and political and religious teachings of the Muslim Brotherhood and promotes what Oliver Roy calls "deculturized religion." The party can be understood as the political component of a larger social movement that seeks to transform Indonesian society and culture in ways that would establish Shari'ah as social, if not political, reality. It is also committed to the electoral process and to working inside the Indonesian political system in a more general sense. Until recently, the PKS has dismissed local modes of Muslim practice and much of Indonesian culture as "un-Islamic." The extent of the party's transformative agenda is unclear for three reasons: it shares the Muslim Brotherhood's gradualist approach, it is less than transparent about its goals, and it is divided into purist or "Justice" and pragmatic or "Prosperity" factions. The leadership of the Prosperity faction is currently ascendant and is attempting to reach beyond its Islamist base by sponsoring musical and dramatic performances it hopes will appeal to Muslims devoted to Javanese and other Indonesian cultural traditions. Ethnographic and web-based research indicate that these efforts are greeted with considerable suspicion.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1872-0218
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1872-0218
  • 1872-0226
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK1.8377432
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_sprin
recordidTN_cdi_springer_primary_2012_11562_7_2_187
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA333404380
sourcerecordidA333404380
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-c3637-7adcf50a7e12f0a364bb6fb533c56b409d27816cf2821c53a4f7b92abf56eb0d0
addsrcrecordideNp9kM1K7TAUhYtcQa_6AM4CzoRqftqkOpGD-HNE0IGOQ5omx0hPWpMUPTNfw9fzSdy14gXhSgg7CevbK3tl2S7BBwRjcRgJKTnNMRl3JfKXtWwTKtwo5X--z6TayP7G-IgxF1UpNrO7C5OS8wukhzYNwRwjhbx5Rr1KD8h2Ac1903kTnXp_fYtoHlu1dDGhqyEmpw1SvkG3oYu9CS6tAAtpdbKdrVvVRrPzVbey-_Ozu9PL_PrmYn46u84140zkQjXallgJQ6jFivGirrmtS8Z0yesCHzVUVIRrSytKdMlUYUV9RFVtS25q3OCtbG_q24fuaTAxycduCB4sJWGcs7JiWIDqYFItVGuk87ZLQWlYjVk6DcNZB-8zxliBC1ZhAMgEaBgsBmNlH9xShZUkWI5pyyltCWnLMW35Aoz4wWiXVHKdBzPX_krSiYzg4hcm_HP7lNJROwuQNvxyRPrGArT_Hwjk7IsUko7A72L6Q_wBCw2xKQ
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1366358307
display
typearticle
titleGetting culture: a new path for Indonesia’s Islamist Justice and Prosperity party?
creatorWoodward, Mark ; Amin, Ali ; Rohmaniyah, Inayah ; Lundry, Chris
creatorcontribWoodward, Mark ; Amin, Ali ; Rohmaniyah, Inayah ; Lundry, Chris
descriptionPartai Keadilan Sejahtera (PKS, The Justice and Prosperity Party) is the largest Islamist political party in Indonesia. It has roots in the religious and political and religious teachings of the Muslim Brotherhood and promotes what Oliver Roy calls "deculturized religion." The party can be understood as the political component of a larger social movement that seeks to transform Indonesian society and culture in ways that would establish Shari'ah as social, if not political, reality. It is also committed to the electoral process and to working inside the Indonesian political system in a more general sense. Until recently, the PKS has dismissed local modes of Muslim practice and much of Indonesian culture as "un-Islamic." The extent of the party's transformative agenda is unclear for three reasons: it shares the Muslim Brotherhood's gradualist approach, it is less than transparent about its goals, and it is divided into purist or "Justice" and pragmatic or "Prosperity" factions. The leadership of the Prosperity faction is currently ascendant and is attempting to reach beyond its Islamist base by sponsoring musical and dramatic performances it hopes will appeal to Muslims devoted to Javanese and other Indonesian cultural traditions. Ethnographic and web-based research indicate that these efforts are greeted with considerable suspicion.
identifier
0ISSN: 1872-0218
1EISSN: 1872-0226
2DOI: 10.1007/s11562-012-0187-x
languageeng
publisherDordrecht: Springer Netherlands
subjectAnthropology ; Culture ; Humanities / Arts ; Humanities, general ; Indonesia ; Islamic fundamentalism ; Islamism ; Muslim brotherhood ; Muslims ; Political aspects ; Political parties ; Political party ; Religious Studies ; Social Sciences, general ; Sociology, general
ispartofContemporary Islam, 2013-07, Vol.7 (2), p.173-189
rights
0Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013
1Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012
2COPYRIGHT 2013 Springer
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-c3637-7adcf50a7e12f0a364bb6fb533c56b409d27816cf2821c53a4f7b92abf56eb0d0
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-c3637-7adcf50a7e12f0a364bb6fb533c56b409d27816cf2821c53a4f7b92abf56eb0d0
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
search
creatorcontrib
0Woodward, Mark
1Amin, Ali
2Rohmaniyah, Inayah
3Lundry, Chris
title
0Getting culture: a new path for Indonesia’s Islamist Justice and Prosperity party?
1Contemporary Islam
addtitleCont Islam
descriptionPartai Keadilan Sejahtera (PKS, The Justice and Prosperity Party) is the largest Islamist political party in Indonesia. It has roots in the religious and political and religious teachings of the Muslim Brotherhood and promotes what Oliver Roy calls "deculturized religion." The party can be understood as the political component of a larger social movement that seeks to transform Indonesian society and culture in ways that would establish Shari'ah as social, if not political, reality. It is also committed to the electoral process and to working inside the Indonesian political system in a more general sense. Until recently, the PKS has dismissed local modes of Muslim practice and much of Indonesian culture as "un-Islamic." The extent of the party's transformative agenda is unclear for three reasons: it shares the Muslim Brotherhood's gradualist approach, it is less than transparent about its goals, and it is divided into purist or "Justice" and pragmatic or "Prosperity" factions. The leadership of the Prosperity faction is currently ascendant and is attempting to reach beyond its Islamist base by sponsoring musical and dramatic performances it hopes will appeal to Muslims devoted to Javanese and other Indonesian cultural traditions. Ethnographic and web-based research indicate that these efforts are greeted with considerable suspicion.
subject
0Anthropology
1Culture
2Humanities / Arts
3Humanities, general
4Indonesia
5Islamic fundamentalism
6Islamism
7Muslim brotherhood
8Muslims
9Political aspects
10Political parties
11Political party
12Religious Studies
13Social Sciences, general
14Sociology, general
issn
01872-0218
11872-0226
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2013
recordtypearticle
recordideNp9kM1K7TAUhYtcQa_6AM4CzoRqftqkOpGD-HNE0IGOQ5omx0hPWpMUPTNfw9fzSdy14gXhSgg7CevbK3tl2S7BBwRjcRgJKTnNMRl3JfKXtWwTKtwo5X--z6TayP7G-IgxF1UpNrO7C5OS8wukhzYNwRwjhbx5Rr1KD8h2Ac1903kTnXp_fYtoHlu1dDGhqyEmpw1SvkG3oYu9CS6tAAtpdbKdrVvVRrPzVbey-_Ozu9PL_PrmYn46u84140zkQjXallgJQ6jFivGirrmtS8Z0yesCHzVUVIRrSytKdMlUYUV9RFVtS25q3OCtbG_q24fuaTAxycduCB4sJWGcs7JiWIDqYFItVGuk87ZLQWlYjVk6DcNZB-8zxliBC1ZhAMgEaBgsBmNlH9xShZUkWI5pyyltCWnLMW35Aoz4wWiXVHKdBzPX_krSiYzg4hcm_HP7lNJROwuQNvxyRPrGArT_Hwjk7IsUko7A72L6Q_wBCw2xKQ
startdate201307
enddate201307
creator
0Woodward, Mark
1Amin, Ali
2Rohmaniyah, Inayah
3Lundry, Chris
general
0Springer Netherlands
1Springer
2Springer Nature B.V
scope
0AAYXX
1CITATION
2BSHEE
33V.
47XB
588H
68FK
78G5
8ABUWG
9AZQEC
10BENPR
11DWQXO
12GB0
13GNUQQ
14GUQSH
15LD-
16LD.
17M2N
18M2O
19MBDVC
20PADUT
21PQEST
22PQQKQ
23PQUKI
24PRINS
25Q9U
26QXPDG
sort
creationdate201307
titleGetting culture: a new path for Indonesia’s Islamist Justice and Prosperity party?
authorWoodward, Mark ; Amin, Ali ; Rohmaniyah, Inayah ; Lundry, Chris
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-c3637-7adcf50a7e12f0a364bb6fb533c56b409d27816cf2821c53a4f7b92abf56eb0d0
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2013
topic
0Anthropology
1Culture
2Humanities / Arts
3Humanities, general
4Indonesia
5Islamic fundamentalism
6Islamism
7Muslim brotherhood
8Muslims
9Political aspects
10Political parties
11Political party
12Religious Studies
13Social Sciences, general
14Sociology, general
creatorcontrib
0Woodward, Mark
1Amin, Ali
2Rohmaniyah, Inayah
3Lundry, Chris
collection
0CrossRef
1Academic OneFile (A&I only)
2ProQuest Central (Corporate)
3ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
4Religion Database (Alumni Edition)
5ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
6Research Library (Alumni Edition)
7ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
8ProQuest Central Essentials
9ProQuest Central
10ProQuest Central Korea
11DELNET Social Sciences & Humanities Collection
12ProQuest Central Student
13Research Library Prep
14Ethnic NewsWatch
15Ethnic NewsWatch (Alumni)
16Religion Database
17Research Library
18Research Library (Corporate)
19Research Library China
20ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
21ProQuest One Academic
22ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
23ProQuest Central China
24ProQuest Central Basic
25Diversity Collection
jtitleContemporary Islam
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Woodward, Mark
1Amin, Ali
2Rohmaniyah, Inayah
3Lundry, Chris
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleGetting culture: a new path for Indonesia’s Islamist Justice and Prosperity party?
jtitleContemporary Islam
stitleCont Islam
date2013-07
risdate2013
volume7
issue2
spage173
epage189
pages173-189
issn1872-0218
eissn1872-0226
abstractPartai Keadilan Sejahtera (PKS, The Justice and Prosperity Party) is the largest Islamist political party in Indonesia. It has roots in the religious and political and religious teachings of the Muslim Brotherhood and promotes what Oliver Roy calls "deculturized religion." The party can be understood as the political component of a larger social movement that seeks to transform Indonesian society and culture in ways that would establish Shari'ah as social, if not political, reality. It is also committed to the electoral process and to working inside the Indonesian political system in a more general sense. Until recently, the PKS has dismissed local modes of Muslim practice and much of Indonesian culture as "un-Islamic." The extent of the party's transformative agenda is unclear for three reasons: it shares the Muslim Brotherhood's gradualist approach, it is less than transparent about its goals, and it is divided into purist or "Justice" and pragmatic or "Prosperity" factions. The leadership of the Prosperity faction is currently ascendant and is attempting to reach beyond its Islamist base by sponsoring musical and dramatic performances it hopes will appeal to Muslims devoted to Javanese and other Indonesian cultural traditions. Ethnographic and web-based research indicate that these efforts are greeted with considerable suspicion.
copDordrecht
pubSpringer Netherlands
doi10.1007/s11562-012-0187-x