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Examining alcohol's contribution to the US African-American/White cirrhosis mortality differential from 1950 to 2002.

AIMSThe aim of this study was to estimate the overall impact of alcohol on US race- and sex-specific age-adjusted cirrhosis mortality rates and to consider beverage-specific effects that represent changes in drinking patterns over time, comparing states with large and small African-American/White ci... Full description

Journal Title: Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford Oxfordshire), 2013 Sep-Oct, Vol.48(5), pp.605-612
Main Author: Kerr, William C
Other Authors: Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J , Ye, Yu
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1464-3502 ; DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agt031
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1426750539/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Examining alcohol's contribution to the US African-American/White cirrhosis mortality differential from 1950 to 2002.
format: Article
creator:
  • Kerr, William C
  • Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J
  • Ye, Yu
subjects:
  • African Americans–Ethnology
  • Alcohol Drinking–Adverse Effects
  • Databases, Factual–Ethnology
  • European Continental Ancestry Group–Trends
  • Female–Trends
  • Humans–Ethnology
  • Liver Cirrhosis–Diagnosis
  • Male–Ethnology
  • United States–Ethnology
ispartof: Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), 2013 Sep-Oct, Vol.48(5), pp.605-612
description: AIMSThe aim of this study was to estimate the overall impact of alcohol on US race- and sex-specific age-adjusted cirrhosis mortality rates and to consider beverage-specific effects that represent changes in drinking patterns over time, comparing states with large and small African-American/White cirrhosis mortality differentials. METHODSUsing series data from 1950 to 2002, the effects of per capita alcohol consumption on cirrhosis mortality for African American and White men and women were estimated using generalized least squares panel models on first-differenced data. Granger causality tests explored geographic patterning of racial differences in cirrhosis mortality. RESULTSCirrhosis mortality was significantly positively related to apparent consumption of alcohol, with an overall impact of 8-14%/l of ethanol. This effect was driven by spirits which were more strongly associated with mortality for African-American women and for African-American men in states with larger mortality differentials. This disparity first emerged in New York and spread through the Northeast and into Midwestern states. CONCLUSIONDifferences in the contribution of alcohol to cirrhosis mortality rates suggest variation by race and gender in life-course patterns of heavy consumption, illicit liquor and spirits use, as well as birth cohort effects.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1464-3502 ; DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agt031
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 14643502
  • 1464-3502
url: Link


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titleExamining alcohol's contribution to the US African-American/White cirrhosis mortality differential from 1950 to 2002.
creatorKerr, William C ; Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J ; Ye, Yu
contributorKerr, William C (correspondence author) ; Kerr, William C (record owner)
ispartofAlcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), 2013 Sep-Oct, Vol.48(5), pp.605-612
identifierE-ISSN: 1464-3502 ; DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agt031
subjectAfrican Americans–Ethnology ; Alcohol Drinking–Adverse Effects ; Databases, Factual–Ethnology ; European Continental Ancestry Group–Trends ; Female–Trends ; Humans–Ethnology ; Liver Cirrhosis–Diagnosis ; Male–Ethnology ; United States–Ethnology
descriptionAIMSThe aim of this study was to estimate the overall impact of alcohol on US race- and sex-specific age-adjusted cirrhosis mortality rates and to consider beverage-specific effects that represent changes in drinking patterns over time, comparing states with large and small African-American/White cirrhosis mortality differentials. METHODSUsing series data from 1950 to 2002, the effects of per capita alcohol consumption on cirrhosis mortality for African American and White men and women were estimated using generalized least squares panel models on first-differenced data. Granger causality tests explored geographic patterning of racial differences in cirrhosis mortality. RESULTSCirrhosis mortality was significantly positively related to apparent consumption of alcohol, with an overall impact of 8-14%/l of ethanol. This effect was driven by spirits which were more strongly associated with mortality for African-American women and for African-American men in states with larger mortality differentials. This disparity first emerged in New York and spread through the Northeast and into Midwestern states. CONCLUSIONDifferences in the contribution of alcohol to cirrhosis mortality rates suggest variation by race and gender in life-course patterns of heavy consumption, illicit liquor and spirits use, as well as birth cohort effects.
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abstractAIMSThe aim of this study was to estimate the overall impact of alcohol on US race- and sex-specific age-adjusted cirrhosis mortality rates and to consider beverage-specific effects that represent changes in drinking patterns over time, comparing states with large and small African-American/White cirrhosis mortality differentials. METHODSUsing series data from 1950 to 2002, the effects of per capita alcohol consumption on cirrhosis mortality for African American and White men and women were estimated using generalized least squares panel models on first-differenced data. Granger causality tests explored geographic patterning of racial differences in cirrhosis mortality. RESULTSCirrhosis mortality was significantly positively related to apparent consumption of alcohol, with an overall impact of 8-14%/l of ethanol. This effect was driven by spirits which were more strongly associated with mortality for African-American women and for African-American men in states with larger mortality differentials. This disparity first emerged in New York and spread through the Northeast and into Midwestern states. CONCLUSIONDifferences in the contribution of alcohol to cirrhosis mortality rates suggest variation by race and gender in life-course patterns of heavy consumption, illicit liquor and spirits use, as well as birth cohort effects.
doi10.1093/alcalc/agt031
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1426750539/
issn07350414
date2013-09-01