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Quantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake and risk of coronary heart disease.

BACKGROUNDDietary guidelines recommend increasing fruit and vegetable intake and, most recently, have also suggested increasing variety. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined the independent roles of quantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake in relation to incident coronary heart disease (CHD)... Full description

Journal Title: The American journal of clinical nutrition December 2013, Vol.98(6), pp.1514-1523
Main Author: Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N
Other Authors: Wedick, Nicole M , Pan, An , Manson, Joann E , Rexrode, Kathyrn M , Willett, Walter C , Rimm, Eric B , Hu, Frank B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.113.066381
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1461337832/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Quantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake and risk of coronary heart disease.
format: Article
creator:
  • Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N
  • Wedick, Nicole M
  • Pan, An
  • Manson, Joann E
  • Rexrode, Kathyrn M
  • Willett, Walter C
  • Rimm, Eric B
  • Hu, Frank B
subjects:
  • Adult–Administration & Dosage
  • Aged–Therapeutic Use
  • Ascorbic Acid–Chemistry
  • Citrus–Epidemiology
  • Cohort Studies–Etiology
  • Coronary Disease–Prevention & Control
  • Diet–Adverse Effects
  • Feeding Behavior–Chemistry
  • Female–Chemistry
  • Follow-Up Studies–Epidemiology
  • Fruit–Chemistry
  • Health Personnel–Administration & Dosage
  • Humans–Therapeutic Use
  • Male–Therapeutic Use
  • Middle Aged–Therapeutic Use
  • Nurses–Therapeutic Use
  • Plant Leaves–Therapeutic Use
  • Prospective Studies–Therapeutic Use
  • Risk Factors–Therapeutic Use
  • United States–Therapeutic Use
  • Vegetables–Therapeutic Use
  • Beta Carotene–Therapeutic Use
  • Abridged
  • Beta Carotene
  • Ascorbic Acid
ispartof: The American journal of clinical nutrition, December 2013, Vol.98(6), pp.1514-1523
description: BACKGROUNDDietary guidelines recommend increasing fruit and vegetable intake and, most recently, have also suggested increasing variety. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined the independent roles of quantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake in relation to incident coronary heart disease (CHD). DESIGNWe prospectively followed 71,141 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2008) and 42,135 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2008) who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer at baseline. Diet was assessed by using a validated questionnaire and updated every 4 y. Variety was defined as the number of unique fruit and vegetables consumed at least once per week. Potatoes, legumes, and fruit juices were not included in our definition of fruit and vegetables. RESULTSDuring follow-up, we documented 2582 CHD cases in women and 3607 cases in men. In multivariable analyses, after adjustment for dietary and nondietary covariates, those in the highest quintile of fruit and vegetable intake had a 17% lower risk (95% CI: 9%, 24%) of CHD. A higher consumption of citrus fruit, green leafy vegetables, and β-carotene- and vitamin C-rich fruit and vegetables was associated with a lower CHD risk. Conversely, quantity-adjusted variety was not associated with CHD. CONCLUSIONSOur data suggest that absolute quantity, rather than variety, in fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a significantly lower risk of CHD. Nevertheless, consumption of specific fruit and vegetable subgroups was associated with a lower CHD risk.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.113.066381
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19383207
  • 1938-3207
url: Link


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titleQuantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake and risk of coronary heart disease.
creatorBhupathiraju, Shilpa N ; Wedick, Nicole M ; Pan, An ; Manson, Joann E ; Rexrode, Kathyrn M ; Willett, Walter C ; Rimm, Eric B ; Hu, Frank B
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ispartofThe American journal of clinical nutrition, December 2013, Vol.98(6), pp.1514-1523
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subjectAdult–Administration & Dosage ; Aged–Therapeutic Use ; Ascorbic Acid–Chemistry ; Citrus–Epidemiology ; Cohort Studies–Etiology ; Coronary Disease–Prevention & Control ; Diet–Adverse Effects ; Feeding Behavior–Chemistry ; Female–Chemistry ; Follow-Up Studies–Epidemiology ; Fruit–Chemistry ; Health Personnel–Administration & Dosage ; Humans–Therapeutic Use ; Male–Therapeutic Use ; Middle Aged–Therapeutic Use ; Nurses–Therapeutic Use ; Plant Leaves–Therapeutic Use ; Prospective Studies–Therapeutic Use ; Risk Factors–Therapeutic Use ; United States–Therapeutic Use ; Vegetables–Therapeutic Use ; Beta Carotene–Therapeutic Use ; Abridged ; Beta Carotene ; Ascorbic Acid
descriptionBACKGROUNDDietary guidelines recommend increasing fruit and vegetable intake and, most recently, have also suggested increasing variety. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined the independent roles of quantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake in relation to incident coronary heart disease (CHD). DESIGNWe prospectively followed 71,141 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2008) and 42,135 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2008) who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer at baseline. Diet was assessed by using a validated questionnaire and updated every 4 y. Variety was defined as the number of unique fruit and vegetables consumed at least once per week. Potatoes, legumes, and fruit juices were not included in our definition of fruit and vegetables. RESULTSDuring follow-up, we documented 2582 CHD cases in women and 3607 cases in men. In multivariable analyses, after adjustment for dietary and nondietary covariates, those in the highest quintile of fruit and vegetable intake had a 17% lower risk (95% CI: 9%, 24%) of CHD. A higher consumption of citrus fruit, green leafy vegetables, and β-carotene- and vitamin C-rich fruit and vegetables was associated with a lower CHD risk. Conversely, quantity-adjusted variety was not associated with CHD. CONCLUSIONSOur data suggest that absolute quantity, rather than variety, in fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a significantly lower risk of CHD. Nevertheless, consumption of specific fruit and vegetable subgroups was associated with a lower CHD risk.
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titleQuantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake and risk of coronary heart disease.
descriptionBACKGROUNDDietary guidelines recommend increasing fruit and vegetable intake and, most recently, have also suggested increasing variety. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined the independent roles of quantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake in relation to incident coronary heart disease (CHD). DESIGNWe prospectively followed 71,141 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2008) and 42,135 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2008) who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer at baseline. Diet was assessed by using a validated questionnaire and updated every 4 y. Variety was defined as the number of unique fruit and vegetables consumed at least once per week. Potatoes, legumes, and fruit juices were not included in our definition of fruit and vegetables. RESULTSDuring follow-up, we documented 2582 CHD cases in women and 3607 cases in men. In multivariable analyses, after adjustment for dietary and nondietary covariates, those in the highest quintile of fruit and vegetable intake had a 17% lower risk (95% CI: 9%, 24%) of CHD. A higher consumption of citrus fruit, green leafy vegetables, and β-carotene- and vitamin C-rich fruit and vegetables was associated with a lower CHD risk. Conversely, quantity-adjusted variety was not associated with CHD. CONCLUSIONSOur data suggest that absolute quantity, rather than variety, in fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a significantly lower risk of CHD. Nevertheless, consumption of specific fruit and vegetable subgroups was associated with a lower CHD risk.
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titleQuantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake and risk of coronary heart disease.
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abstractBACKGROUNDDietary guidelines recommend increasing fruit and vegetable intake and, most recently, have also suggested increasing variety. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined the independent roles of quantity and variety in fruit and vegetable intake in relation to incident coronary heart disease (CHD). DESIGNWe prospectively followed 71,141 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2008) and 42,135 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2008) who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer at baseline. Diet was assessed by using a validated questionnaire and updated every 4 y. Variety was defined as the number of unique fruit and vegetables consumed at least once per week. Potatoes, legumes, and fruit juices were not included in our definition of fruit and vegetables. RESULTSDuring follow-up, we documented 2582 CHD cases in women and 3607 cases in men. In multivariable analyses, after adjustment for dietary and nondietary covariates, those in the highest quintile of fruit and vegetable intake had a 17% lower risk (95% CI: 9%, 24%) of CHD. A higher consumption of citrus fruit, green leafy vegetables, and β-carotene- and vitamin C-rich fruit and vegetables was associated with a lower CHD risk. Conversely, quantity-adjusted variety was not associated with CHD. CONCLUSIONSOur data suggest that absolute quantity, rather than variety, in fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a significantly lower risk of CHD. Nevertheless, consumption of specific fruit and vegetable subgroups was associated with a lower CHD risk.
doi10.3945/ajcn.113.066381
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1461337832/
issn00029165
date2013-12-01