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The Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and mortality among men and women with cardiovascular disease.

BACKGROUNDThe role of the Mediterranean diet among individuals with previous cardiovascular disease (CVD) is uncertain. OBJECTIVEThe aim of this study was to assess the association between the Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED) score and all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in men and wo... Full description

Journal Title: The American journal of clinical nutrition January 2014, Vol.99(1), pp.172-180
Main Author: Lopez-Garcia, Esther
Other Authors: Rodriguez-Artalejo, Fernando , Li, Tricia Y , Fung, Teresa T , Li, Shanshan , Willett, Walter C , Rimm, Eric B , Hu, Frank B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.113.068106
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1490735940/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: The Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and mortality among men and women with cardiovascular disease.
format: Article
creator:
  • Lopez-Garcia, Esther
  • Rodriguez-Artalejo, Fernando
  • Li, Tricia Y
  • Fung, Teresa T
  • Li, Shanshan
  • Willett, Walter C
  • Rimm, Eric B
  • Hu, Frank B
subjects:
  • Adult–Mortality
  • Aged–Prevention & Control
  • Body Mass Index–Mortality
  • Cardiovascular Diseases–Prevention & Control
  • Diet, Mediterranean–Prevention & Control
  • Feeding Behavior–Prevention & Control
  • Female–Prevention & Control
  • Follow-Up Studies–Prevention & Control
  • Humans–Prevention & Control
  • Life Style–Prevention & Control
  • Male–Prevention & Control
  • Middle Aged–Prevention & Control
  • Multivariate Analysis–Prevention & Control
  • Neoplasms–Prevention & Control
  • Nutrition Assessment–Prevention & Control
  • Patient Compliance–Prevention & Control
  • Proportional Hazards Models–Prevention & Control
  • Prospective Studies–Prevention & Control
  • Surveys and Questionnaires–Prevention & Control
  • Abridged
ispartof: The American journal of clinical nutrition, January 2014, Vol.99(1), pp.172-180
description: BACKGROUNDThe role of the Mediterranean diet among individuals with previous cardiovascular disease (CVD) is uncertain. OBJECTIVEThe aim of this study was to assess the association between the Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED) score and all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in men and women with CVD from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Nurses' Health Study. DESIGNThis study included 6137 men and 11,278 women with myocardial infarction, stroke, angina pectoris, coronary bypass, and coronary angioplasty. Diet was first assessed in 1986 for men and in 1980 for women with a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and then repeatedly every 2-4 y. Cumulative consumption was calculated with all available FFQs from the diagnosis of CVD to the end of the follow-up in 2008. RESULTSDuring a median follow-up of 7.7 y (IQR: 4.2-11.8) for men and 5.8 y (IQR: 3.8-8.0) for women, we documented 1982 deaths (1142 from CVD and 344 from cancer) among men and 1468 deaths (666 from CVD and 197 from cancer) among women. In multivariable Cox regression models, the pooled RR of all-cause mortality from a comparison of the top with the bottom quintiles of the aMED score was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.91; P-trend < 0.001). The corresponding pooled RR for CVD mortality was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.09; P-trend = 0.30), for cancer mortality was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.11; P-trend = 0.10), and for other causes was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.97; P-trend = 0.01). A 2-point increase in adherence to the aMED score was associated with a 7% (95% CI: 3%, 11%) reduction in the risk of total mortality. CONCLUSIONAdherence to a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern was associated with lower all-cause mortality in individuals with CVD.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.113.068106
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19383207
  • 1938-3207
url: Link


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descriptionBACKGROUNDThe role of the Mediterranean diet among individuals with previous cardiovascular disease (CVD) is uncertain. OBJECTIVEThe aim of this study was to assess the association between the Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED) score and all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in men and women with CVD from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Nurses' Health Study. DESIGNThis study included 6137 men and 11,278 women with myocardial infarction, stroke, angina pectoris, coronary bypass, and coronary angioplasty. Diet was first assessed in 1986 for men and in 1980 for women with a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and then repeatedly every 2-4 y. Cumulative consumption was calculated with all available FFQs from the diagnosis of CVD to the end of the follow-up in 2008. RESULTSDuring a median follow-up of 7.7 y (IQR: 4.2-11.8) for men and 5.8 y (IQR: 3.8-8.0) for women, we documented 1982 deaths (1142 from CVD and 344 from cancer) among men and 1468 deaths (666 from CVD and 197 from cancer) among women. In multivariable Cox regression models, the pooled RR of all-cause mortality from a comparison of the top with the bottom quintiles of the aMED score was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.91; P-trend < 0.001). The corresponding pooled RR for CVD mortality was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.09; P-trend = 0.30), for cancer mortality was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.11; P-trend = 0.10), and for other causes was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.97; P-trend = 0.01). A 2-point increase in adherence to the aMED score was associated with a 7% (95% CI: 3%, 11%) reduction in the risk of total mortality. CONCLUSIONAdherence to a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern was associated with lower all-cause mortality in individuals with CVD.
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titleThe Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and mortality among men and women with cardiovascular disease.
descriptionBACKGROUNDThe role of the Mediterranean diet among individuals with previous cardiovascular disease (CVD) is uncertain. OBJECTIVEThe aim of this study was to assess the association between the Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED) score and all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in men and women with CVD from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Nurses' Health Study. DESIGNThis study included 6137 men and 11,278 women with myocardial infarction, stroke, angina pectoris, coronary bypass, and coronary angioplasty. Diet was first assessed in 1986 for men and in 1980 for women with a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and then repeatedly every 2-4 y. Cumulative consumption was calculated with all available FFQs from the diagnosis of CVD to the end of the follow-up in 2008. RESULTSDuring a median follow-up of 7.7 y (IQR: 4.2-11.8) for men and 5.8 y (IQR: 3.8-8.0) for women, we documented 1982 deaths (1142 from CVD and 344 from cancer) among men and 1468 deaths (666 from CVD and 197 from cancer) among women. In multivariable Cox regression models, the pooled RR of all-cause mortality from a comparison of the top with the bottom quintiles of the aMED score was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.91; P-trend < 0.001). The corresponding pooled RR for CVD mortality was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.09; P-trend = 0.30), for cancer mortality was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.11; P-trend = 0.10), and for other causes was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.97; P-trend = 0.01). A 2-point increase in adherence to the aMED score was associated with a 7% (95% CI: 3%, 11%) reduction in the risk of total mortality. CONCLUSIONAdherence to a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern was associated with lower all-cause mortality in individuals with CVD.
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titleThe Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and mortality among men and women with cardiovascular disease.
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abstractBACKGROUNDThe role of the Mediterranean diet among individuals with previous cardiovascular disease (CVD) is uncertain. OBJECTIVEThe aim of this study was to assess the association between the Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED) score and all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in men and women with CVD from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Nurses' Health Study. DESIGNThis study included 6137 men and 11,278 women with myocardial infarction, stroke, angina pectoris, coronary bypass, and coronary angioplasty. Diet was first assessed in 1986 for men and in 1980 for women with a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and then repeatedly every 2-4 y. Cumulative consumption was calculated with all available FFQs from the diagnosis of CVD to the end of the follow-up in 2008. RESULTSDuring a median follow-up of 7.7 y (IQR: 4.2-11.8) for men and 5.8 y (IQR: 3.8-8.0) for women, we documented 1982 deaths (1142 from CVD and 344 from cancer) among men and 1468 deaths (666 from CVD and 197 from cancer) among women. In multivariable Cox regression models, the pooled RR of all-cause mortality from a comparison of the top with the bottom quintiles of the aMED score was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.91; P-trend < 0.001). The corresponding pooled RR for CVD mortality was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.09; P-trend = 0.30), for cancer mortality was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.11; P-trend = 0.10), and for other causes was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.97; P-trend = 0.01). A 2-point increase in adherence to the aMED score was associated with a 7% (95% CI: 3%, 11%) reduction in the risk of total mortality. CONCLUSIONAdherence to a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern was associated with lower all-cause mortality in individuals with CVD.
doi10.3945/ajcn.113.068106
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1490735940/
issn00029165
date2014-01-01