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Whose time is it? The pluralization of time and the global condition, 1870s-1940s

Ogle looks at the history of time unification from a global perspective. It focuses on two different locales, Bombay and Beirut, diverse commercial and intellectual centers located in British India and the Ottoman Empire, respectively. In the increasingly globalized and interconnected world of the 1... Full description

Journal Title: American historical review Dec 2013, Vol.118(5), pp.1376-1402
Main Author: Ogle, Vanessa
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0002-8762
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1493999452/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Whose time is it? The pluralization of time and the global condition, 1870s-1940s
format: Article
creator:
  • Ogle, Vanessa
subjects:
  • Ottoman Empire
  • Conceptualization
  • Colonialism
  • Standardization
  • Globalization
  • Historical Analysis
  • India
  • Europe
  • Lebanon
  • United Kingdom
  • Political Science
ispartof: American historical review, Dec 2013, Vol.118(5), pp.1376-1402
description: Ogle looks at the history of time unification from a global perspective. It focuses on two different locales, Bombay and Beirut, diverse commercial and intellectual centers located in British India and the Ottoman Empire, respectively. In the increasingly globalized and interconnected world of the 19th century, a preoccupation with time emerged simultaneously in a variety of places. As a consequence, in cities such as Bombay and Beirut, European concepts of uniform, standardized time competed with other varieties of time. Attitudes toward time in the two metropolises were shaped by the political circumstances of colonial rule in Bombay, on the one hand, and the threat of future colonial subjugation by Europeans in Beirut, on the other. Therefore, European attempts to introduce uniform mean times and to spread ideas about social time merely added yet another layer to already variegated temporal landscapes. The result was a pluralized global condition of time that required switching between different orders of coexisting times for much longer than is commonly assumed.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-8762
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00028762
  • 0002-8762
url: Link


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subjectOttoman Empire ; Conceptualization ; Colonialism ; Standardization ; Globalization ; Historical Analysis ; India ; Europe ; Lebanon ; United Kingdom ; Political Science
descriptionOgle looks at the history of time unification from a global perspective. It focuses on two different locales, Bombay and Beirut, diverse commercial and intellectual centers located in British India and the Ottoman Empire, respectively. In the increasingly globalized and interconnected world of the 19th century, a preoccupation with time emerged simultaneously in a variety of places. As a consequence, in cities such as Bombay and Beirut, European concepts of uniform, standardized time competed with other varieties of time. Attitudes toward time in the two metropolises were shaped by the political circumstances of colonial rule in Bombay, on the one hand, and the threat of future colonial subjugation by Europeans in Beirut, on the other. Therefore, European attempts to introduce uniform mean times and to spread ideas about social time merely added yet another layer to already variegated temporal landscapes. The result was a pluralized global condition of time that required switching between different orders of coexisting times for much longer than is commonly assumed.
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abstractOgle looks at the history of time unification from a global perspective. It focuses on two different locales, Bombay and Beirut, diverse commercial and intellectual centers located in British India and the Ottoman Empire, respectively. In the increasingly globalized and interconnected world of the 19th century, a preoccupation with time emerged simultaneously in a variety of places. As a consequence, in cities such as Bombay and Beirut, European concepts of uniform, standardized time competed with other varieties of time. Attitudes toward time in the two metropolises were shaped by the political circumstances of colonial rule in Bombay, on the one hand, and the threat of future colonial subjugation by Europeans in Beirut, on the other. Therefore, European attempts to introduce uniform mean times and to spread ideas about social time merely added yet another layer to already variegated temporal landscapes. The result was a pluralized global condition of time that required switching between different orders of coexisting times for much longer than is commonly assumed.
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