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Energy adjustment of nutrient intakes is preferable to adjustment using body weight and physical activity in epidemiological analyses.

OBJECTIVEAdjustment for body weight and physical activity has been suggested as an alternative to adjusting for reported energy intake in nutritional epidemiology. We examined which of these approaches would yield stronger correlations between nutrients and their biomarkers. DESIGNA cross-sectional... Full description

Journal Title: Public health nutrition May 2014, Vol.17(5), pp.1054-1060
Main Author: Rhee, Jinnie J
Other Authors: Cho, Eunyoung , Willett, Walter C
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1475-2727 ; DOI: 10.1017/S1368980013001390
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1512223568/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest1512223568
title: Energy adjustment of nutrient intakes is preferable to adjustment using body weight and physical activity in epidemiological analyses.
format: Article
creator:
  • Rhee, Jinnie J
  • Cho, Eunyoung
  • Willett, Walter C
subjects:
  • Adult–Blood
  • Biomarkers–Administration & Dosage
  • Body Weight–Blood
  • Carotenoids–Methods
  • Case-Control Studies–Metabolism
  • Cross-Sectional Studies–Administration & Dosage
  • Diet–Blood
  • Diet Surveys–Administration & Dosage
  • Energy Intake–Blood
  • Epidemiologic Studies–Administration & Dosage
  • Erythrocytes–Blood
  • Exercise–Administration & Dosage
  • Fatty Acids–Blood
  • Fatty Acids, Unsaturated–Administration & Dosage
  • Female–Blood
  • Humans–Blood
  • Micronutrients–Blood
  • Middle Aged–Blood
  • Self Report–Blood
  • Surveys and Questionnaires–Blood
  • Trans Fatty Acids–Blood
  • United States–Blood
  • Vitamin A–Blood
  • Biomarkers
  • Fatty Acids
  • Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
  • Micronutrients
  • Trans Fatty Acids
  • Vitamin A
  • Carotenoids
ispartof: Public health nutrition, May 2014, Vol.17(5), pp.1054-1060
description: OBJECTIVEAdjustment for body weight and physical activity has been suggested as an alternative to adjusting for reported energy intake in nutritional epidemiology. We examined which of these approaches would yield stronger correlations between nutrients and their biomarkers. DESIGNA cross-sectional study in which dietary fatty acids, carotenoids and retinol were adjusted for reported energy intake and, separately, for weight and physical activity using the residual method. Correlations between adjusted nutrients and their biomarkers were examined. SETTINGUSA. SUBJECTSCases and controls from a nested case-control study of erythrocyte fatty acids and CHD (n 442) and of plasma carotenoids and retinol and breast cancer (n 1254). RESULTSCorrelations between intakes and plasma levels of trans-fatty acids were 0·30 (energy-adjusted) and 0·16 (weight- and activity-adjusted); for erythrocyte levels, the corresponding correlations were 0·37 and 0·25. Energy-adjusted intakes of linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid were more strongly correlated with their respective biomarkers than weight- and activity-adjusted intakes, but the differences were not significant except for linoleic acid (erythrocyte). Weight- and activity-adjusted DHA intake was slightly more strongly correlated with its plasma biomarker than energy-adjusted intake (0·37 v. 0·34). Neither method made a difference for DHA (erythrocyte), carotenoids and retinol. CONCLUSIONSThe effect of energy adjustment depends on the nutrient under investigation, and adjustment for energy calculated from the same questionnaire used to estimate nutrient intakes improves the correlation of some nutrients with their biomarkers appreciably. For the nutrients examined, adjustment using weight and physical activity had at most a small effect on these correlations.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1475-2727 ; DOI: 10.1017/S1368980013001390
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 14752727
  • 1475-2727
url: Link


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titleEnergy adjustment of nutrient intakes is preferable to adjustment using body weight and physical activity in epidemiological analyses.
creatorRhee, Jinnie J ; Cho, Eunyoung ; Willett, Walter C
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ispartofPublic health nutrition, May 2014, Vol.17(5), pp.1054-1060
identifierE-ISSN: 1475-2727 ; DOI: 10.1017/S1368980013001390
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descriptionOBJECTIVEAdjustment for body weight and physical activity has been suggested as an alternative to adjusting for reported energy intake in nutritional epidemiology. We examined which of these approaches would yield stronger correlations between nutrients and their biomarkers. DESIGNA cross-sectional study in which dietary fatty acids, carotenoids and retinol were adjusted for reported energy intake and, separately, for weight and physical activity using the residual method. Correlations between adjusted nutrients and their biomarkers were examined. SETTINGUSA. SUBJECTSCases and controls from a nested case-control study of erythrocyte fatty acids and CHD (n 442) and of plasma carotenoids and retinol and breast cancer (n 1254). RESULTSCorrelations between intakes and plasma levels of trans-fatty acids were 0·30 (energy-adjusted) and 0·16 (weight- and activity-adjusted); for erythrocyte levels, the corresponding correlations were 0·37 and 0·25. Energy-adjusted intakes of linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid were more strongly correlated with their respective biomarkers than weight- and activity-adjusted intakes, but the differences were not significant except for linoleic acid (erythrocyte). Weight- and activity-adjusted DHA intake was slightly more strongly correlated with its plasma biomarker than energy-adjusted intake (0·37 v. 0·34). Neither method made a difference for DHA (erythrocyte), carotenoids and retinol. CONCLUSIONSThe effect of energy adjustment depends on the nutrient under investigation, and adjustment for energy calculated from the same questionnaire used to estimate nutrient intakes improves the correlation of some nutrients with their biomarkers appreciably. For the nutrients examined, adjustment using weight and physical activity had at most a small effect on these correlations.
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titleEnergy adjustment of nutrient intakes is preferable to adjustment using body weight and physical activity in epidemiological analyses.
descriptionOBJECTIVEAdjustment for body weight and physical activity has been suggested as an alternative to adjusting for reported energy intake in nutritional epidemiology. We examined which of these approaches would yield stronger correlations between nutrients and their biomarkers. DESIGNA cross-sectional study in which dietary fatty acids, carotenoids and retinol were adjusted for reported energy intake and, separately, for weight and physical activity using the residual method. Correlations between adjusted nutrients and their biomarkers were examined. SETTINGUSA. SUBJECTSCases and controls from a nested case-control study of erythrocyte fatty acids and CHD (n 442) and of plasma carotenoids and retinol and breast cancer (n 1254). RESULTSCorrelations between intakes and plasma levels of trans-fatty acids were 0·30 (energy-adjusted) and 0·16 (weight- and activity-adjusted); for erythrocyte levels, the corresponding correlations were 0·37 and 0·25. Energy-adjusted intakes of linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid were more strongly correlated with their respective biomarkers than weight- and activity-adjusted intakes, but the differences were not significant except for linoleic acid (erythrocyte). Weight- and activity-adjusted DHA intake was slightly more strongly correlated with its plasma biomarker than energy-adjusted intake (0·37 v. 0·34). Neither method made a difference for DHA (erythrocyte), carotenoids and retinol. CONCLUSIONSThe effect of energy adjustment depends on the nutrient under investigation, and adjustment for energy calculated from the same questionnaire used to estimate nutrient intakes improves the correlation of some nutrients with their biomarkers appreciably. For the nutrients examined, adjustment using weight and physical activity had at most a small effect on these correlations.
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11Exercise–Administration & Dosage
12Fatty Acids–Blood
13Fatty Acids, Unsaturated–Administration & Dosage
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15Humans–Blood
16Micronutrients–Blood
17Middle Aged–Blood
18Self Report–Blood
19Surveys and Questionnaires–Blood
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25Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
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titleEnergy adjustment of nutrient intakes is preferable to adjustment using body weight and physical activity in epidemiological analyses.
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15Humans–Blood
16Micronutrients–Blood
17Middle Aged–Blood
18Self Report–Blood
19Surveys and Questionnaires–Blood
20Trans Fatty Acids–Blood
21United States–Blood
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25Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
26Micronutrients
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abstractOBJECTIVEAdjustment for body weight and physical activity has been suggested as an alternative to adjusting for reported energy intake in nutritional epidemiology. We examined which of these approaches would yield stronger correlations between nutrients and their biomarkers. DESIGNA cross-sectional study in which dietary fatty acids, carotenoids and retinol were adjusted for reported energy intake and, separately, for weight and physical activity using the residual method. Correlations between adjusted nutrients and their biomarkers were examined. SETTINGUSA. SUBJECTSCases and controls from a nested case-control study of erythrocyte fatty acids and CHD (n 442) and of plasma carotenoids and retinol and breast cancer (n 1254). RESULTSCorrelations between intakes and plasma levels of trans-fatty acids were 0·30 (energy-adjusted) and 0·16 (weight- and activity-adjusted); for erythrocyte levels, the corresponding correlations were 0·37 and 0·25. Energy-adjusted intakes of linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid were more strongly correlated with their respective biomarkers than weight- and activity-adjusted intakes, but the differences were not significant except for linoleic acid (erythrocyte). Weight- and activity-adjusted DHA intake was slightly more strongly correlated with its plasma biomarker than energy-adjusted intake (0·37 v. 0·34). Neither method made a difference for DHA (erythrocyte), carotenoids and retinol. CONCLUSIONSThe effect of energy adjustment depends on the nutrient under investigation, and adjustment for energy calculated from the same questionnaire used to estimate nutrient intakes improves the correlation of some nutrients with their biomarkers appreciably. For the nutrients examined, adjustment using weight and physical activity had at most a small effect on these correlations.
doi10.1017/S1368980013001390
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1512223568/
issn13689800
date2014-05-01