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Combat exposure severity as a moderator of genetic and environmental liability to post-traumatic stress disorder.

BACKGROUNDTwin studies of veterans and adults suggest that approximately 30-46% of the variance in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is attributable to genetic factors. The remaining variance is attributable to the non-shared environment, which, by definition, includes combat exposure. This stud... Full description

Journal Title: Psychological medicine May 2014, Vol.44(7), pp.1499-1509
Main Author: Wolf, E J
Other Authors: Mitchell, K S , Koenen, K C , Miller, M W
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved
ID: E-ISSN: 1469-8978 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0033291713002286
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1543280860/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest1543280860
title: Combat exposure severity as a moderator of genetic and environmental liability to post-traumatic stress disorder.
format: Article
creator:
  • Wolf, E J
  • Mitchell, K S
  • Koenen, K C
  • Miller, M W
subjects:
  • Adult–Complications
  • Combat Disorders–Etiology
  • Diseases in Twins–Genetics
  • Gene-Environment Interaction–Etiology
  • Humans–Genetics
  • Male–Psychology
  • Middle Aged–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Registries–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • United States–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Veterans–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Vietnam Conflict–Statistics & Numerical Data
ispartof: Psychological medicine, May 2014, Vol.44(7), pp.1499-1509
description: BACKGROUNDTwin studies of veterans and adults suggest that approximately 30-46% of the variance in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is attributable to genetic factors. The remaining variance is attributable to the non-shared environment, which, by definition, includes combat exposure. This study used a gene by measured environment twin design to determine whether the effects of genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the etiology of PTSD are dependent on the level of combat exposure. METHODThe sample was drawn from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry (VETR) and included 620 male-male twin pairs who served in the US Military in South East Asia during the Vietnam War era. Analyses were based on data from a clinical diagnostic interview of lifetime PTSD symptoms and a self-report measure of combat exposure. RESULTSBiometric modeling revealed that the effects of genetic and non-shared environment factors on PTSD varied as a function of level of combat exposure such that the association between these factors and PTSD was stronger at higher levels of combat exposure. CONCLUSIONSCombat exposure may act as a catalyst that augments the impact of hereditary and environmental contributions to PTSD. Individuals with the greatest exposure to combat trauma were at increased risk for PTSD as a function of both genetic and environmental factors. Additional work is needed to determine the biological and environmental mechanisms driving these associations.
language: eng
source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved
identifier: E-ISSN: 1469-8978 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0033291713002286
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 14698978
  • 1469-8978
url: Link


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titleCombat exposure severity as a moderator of genetic and environmental liability to post-traumatic stress disorder.
creatorWolf, E J ; Mitchell, K S ; Koenen, K C ; Miller, M W
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identifierE-ISSN: 1469-8978 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0033291713002286
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descriptionBACKGROUNDTwin studies of veterans and adults suggest that approximately 30-46% of the variance in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is attributable to genetic factors. The remaining variance is attributable to the non-shared environment, which, by definition, includes combat exposure. This study used a gene by measured environment twin design to determine whether the effects of genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the etiology of PTSD are dependent on the level of combat exposure. METHODThe sample was drawn from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry (VETR) and included 620 male-male twin pairs who served in the US Military in South East Asia during the Vietnam War era. Analyses were based on data from a clinical diagnostic interview of lifetime PTSD symptoms and a self-report measure of combat exposure. RESULTSBiometric modeling revealed that the effects of genetic and non-shared environment factors on PTSD varied as a function of level of combat exposure such that the association between these factors and PTSD was stronger at higher levels of combat exposure. CONCLUSIONSCombat exposure may act as a catalyst that augments the impact of hereditary and environmental contributions to PTSD. Individuals with the greatest exposure to combat trauma were at increased risk for PTSD as a function of both genetic and environmental factors. Additional work is needed to determine the biological and environmental mechanisms driving these associations.
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abstractBACKGROUNDTwin studies of veterans and adults suggest that approximately 30-46% of the variance in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is attributable to genetic factors. The remaining variance is attributable to the non-shared environment, which, by definition, includes combat exposure. This study used a gene by measured environment twin design to determine whether the effects of genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the etiology of PTSD are dependent on the level of combat exposure. METHODThe sample was drawn from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry (VETR) and included 620 male-male twin pairs who served in the US Military in South East Asia during the Vietnam War era. Analyses were based on data from a clinical diagnostic interview of lifetime PTSD symptoms and a self-report measure of combat exposure. RESULTSBiometric modeling revealed that the effects of genetic and non-shared environment factors on PTSD varied as a function of level of combat exposure such that the association between these factors and PTSD was stronger at higher levels of combat exposure. CONCLUSIONSCombat exposure may act as a catalyst that augments the impact of hereditary and environmental contributions to PTSD. Individuals with the greatest exposure to combat trauma were at increased risk for PTSD as a function of both genetic and environmental factors. Additional work is needed to determine the biological and environmental mechanisms driving these associations.
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date2014-05-01