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Cuprates Get Orders to Charge

A quarter century after their initial discovery, copper oxide high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) continue to fascinate and frustrate researchers. One of the big challenges to understanding these materials is that the standard model of electron motion in solids-the same model that had to be deve... Full description

Journal Title: Science Aug 17, 2012, Vol.337(6096), pp.811-812
Main Author: Tranquada, John
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
CU
ID: ISSN: 0036-8075 ; DOI: 10.1126/science.1227082
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1559704800/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest1559704800
title: Cuprates Get Orders to Charge
format: Article
creator:
  • Tranquada, John
subjects:
  • Superconductivity
  • Oscillations
  • CU
  • Superconductors
  • Magnetic Field
  • Charge
  • Yttrium Oxide
  • High Temperature Superconductors
  • Order Disorder Relationships
  • Magnetic Fields
  • Electronic Products
  • Copper Oxide
  • Electrical Conductivity
  • Electronics
  • Order Disorder
  • Superconductivity
  • Field Strength
  • Miscellaneous Sciences (So)
  • General and Nonclassified (Ep)
  • General and Nonclassified (Ed)
ispartof: Science, Aug 17, 2012, Vol.337(6096), pp.811-812
description: A quarter century after their initial discovery, copper oxide high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) continue to fascinate and frustrate researchers. One of the big challenges to understanding these materials is that the standard model of electron motion in solids-the same model that had to be developed before Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer could formulate their theory of superconductivity in 1957-does not apply, and no convenient replacement is yet in sight. While theoretical efforts proceed, the focus of research has periodically shifted from one experimental surprise to another. For example, several years ago it was discovered in the superconducting compound YBa2Cu3O6+x that when the superconducting order is suppressed by a very strong magnetic field, various electronic responses oscillate with the field strength in a way that indicates the presence of a new electronic ordering (1, 2). These experiments stimulated a great deal of theoretical excitement, but a...
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0036-8075 ; DOI: 10.1126/science.1227082
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 00368075
  • 0036-8075
url: Link


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ispartofScience, Aug 17, 2012, Vol.337(6096), pp.811-812
identifierISSN: 0036-8075 ; DOI: 10.1126/science.1227082
subjectSuperconductivity ; Oscillations ; CU ; Superconductors ; Magnetic Field ; Charge ; Yttrium Oxide ; High Temperature Superconductors ; Order Disorder Relationships ; Magnetic Fields ; Electronic Products ; Copper Oxide ; Electrical Conductivity ; Electronics ; Order Disorder ; Superconductivity ; Field Strength ; Miscellaneous Sciences (So) ; General and Nonclassified (Ep) ; General and Nonclassified (Ed)
descriptionA quarter century after their initial discovery, copper oxide high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) continue to fascinate and frustrate researchers. One of the big challenges to understanding these materials is that the standard model of electron motion in solids-the same model that had to be developed before Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer could formulate their theory of superconductivity in 1957-does not apply, and no convenient replacement is yet in sight. While theoretical efforts proceed, the focus of research has periodically shifted from one experimental surprise to another. For example, several years ago it was discovered in the superconducting compound YBa2Cu3O6+x that when the superconducting order is suppressed by a very strong magnetic field, various electronic responses oscillate with the field strength in a way that indicates the presence of a new electronic ordering (1, 2). These experiments stimulated a great deal of theoretical excitement, but a...
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descriptionA quarter century after their initial discovery, copper oxide high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) continue to fascinate and frustrate researchers. One of the big challenges to understanding these materials is that the standard model of electron motion in solids-the same model that had to be developed before Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer could formulate their theory of superconductivity in 1957-does not apply, and no convenient replacement is yet in sight. While theoretical efforts proceed, the focus of research has periodically shifted from one experimental surprise to another. For example, several years ago it was discovered in the superconducting compound YBa2Cu3O6+x that when the superconducting order is suppressed by a very strong magnetic field, various electronic responses oscillate with the field strength in a way that indicates the presence of a new electronic ordering (1, 2). These experiments stimulated a great deal of theoretical excitement, but a...
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abstractA quarter century after their initial discovery, copper oxide high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) continue to fascinate and frustrate researchers. One of the big challenges to understanding these materials is that the standard model of electron motion in solids-the same model that had to be developed before Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer could formulate their theory of superconductivity in 1957-does not apply, and no convenient replacement is yet in sight. While theoretical efforts proceed, the focus of research has periodically shifted from one experimental surprise to another. For example, several years ago it was discovered in the superconducting compound YBa2Cu3O6+x that when the superconducting order is suppressed by a very strong magnetic field, various electronic responses oscillate with the field strength in a way that indicates the presence of a new electronic ordering (1, 2). These experiments stimulated a great deal of theoretical excitement, but a...
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date2012-08-17