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Mediterranean diets and metabolic syndrome status in the PREDIMED randomized trial.

BACKGROUNDLittle evidence exists on the effect of an energy-unrestricted healthy diet on metabolic syndrome. We evaluated the long-term effect of Mediterranean diets ad libitum on the incidence or reversion of metabolic syndrome. METHODSWe performed a secondary analysis of the PREDIMED trial--a mult... Full description

Journal Title: CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne November 18, 2014, Vol.186(17), pp.E649-E657
Main Author: Babio, Nancy
Other Authors: Toledo, Estefanía , Estruch, Ramón , Ros, Emilio , Martínez-González, Miguel A , Castañer, Olga , Bulló, Mònica , Corella, Dolores , Arós, Fernando , Gómez-Gracia, Enrique , Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina , Fiol, Miquel , Lapetra, José , Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M , Serra-Majem, Lluís , Pintó, Xavier , Basora, Josep , Sorlí, José V , Salas-Salvadó, Jordi , Babio, Nancy
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1488-2329 ; DOI: 1488-2329 ; DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.140764
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1626166274/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Mediterranean diets and metabolic syndrome status in the PREDIMED randomized trial.
format: Article
creator:
  • Babio, Nancy
  • Toledo, Estefanía
  • Estruch, Ramón
  • Ros, Emilio
  • Martínez-González, Miguel A
  • Castañer, Olga
  • Bulló, Mònica
  • Corella, Dolores
  • Arós, Fernando
  • Gómez-Gracia, Enrique
  • Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina
  • Fiol, Miquel
  • Lapetra, José
  • Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M
  • Serra-Majem, Lluís
  • Pintó, Xavier
  • Basora, Josep
  • Sorlí, José V
  • Salas-Salvadó, Jordi
  • Babio, Nancy
subjects:
  • Aged–Diet Therapy
  • Aged, 80 and Over–Epidemiology
  • Diet, Mediterranean–Prevention & Control
  • Female–Prevention & Control
  • Follow-Up Studies–Prevention & Control
  • Humans–Prevention & Control
  • Incidence–Prevention & Control
  • Male–Prevention & Control
  • Metabolic Syndrome–Prevention & Control
  • Middle Aged–Prevention & Control
  • Proportional Hazards Models–Prevention & Control
  • Treatment Outcome–Prevention & Control
  • Abridged
ispartof: CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne, November 18, 2014, Vol.186(17), pp.E649-E657
description: BACKGROUNDLittle evidence exists on the effect of an energy-unrestricted healthy diet on metabolic syndrome. We evaluated the long-term effect of Mediterranean diets ad libitum on the incidence or reversion of metabolic syndrome. METHODSWe performed a secondary analysis of the PREDIMED trial--a multicentre, randomized trial done between October 2003 and December 2010 that involved men and women (age 55-80 yr) at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary interventions: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts or advice on following a low-fat diet (the control group). The interventions did not include increased physical activity or weight loss as a goal. We analyzed available data from 5801 participants. We determined the effect of diet on incidence and reversion of metabolic syndrome using Cox regression analysis to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTSOver 4.8 years of follow-up, metabolic syndrome developed in 960 (50.0%) of the 1919 participants who did not have the condition at baseline. The risk of developing metabolic syndrome did not differ between participants assigned to the control diet and those assigned to either of the Mediterranean diets (control v. olive oil HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.94-1.30, p = 0.231; control v. nuts HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.92-1.27, p = 0.3). Reversion occurred in 958 (28.2%) of the 3392 participants who had metabolic syndrome at baseline. Compared with the control group, participants on either Mediterranean diet were more likely to undergo reversion (control v. olive oil HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.15-1.58, p < 0.001; control v. nuts HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.08-1.51, p < 0.001). Participants in the group receiving olive oil supplementation showed significant decreases in both central obesity and high fasting glucose (p = 0.02); participants in the group supplemented with nuts showed a significant decrease in central obesity. INTERPRETATIONA Mediterranean diet supplemented with either extra virgin olive oil or nuts is not associated with the onset of metabolic syndrome, but such diets are more likely to cause reversion of the condition. An energy-unrestricted Mediterranean diet may be useful in reducing the risks of central obesity and hyperglycemia in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease. TRIAL REGISTRATIONClinicalTrials.gov, no. ISRCTN35739639.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1488-2329 ; DOI: 1488-2329 ; DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.140764
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 14882329
  • 1488-2329
url: Link


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titleMediterranean diets and metabolic syndrome status in the PREDIMED randomized trial.
creatorBabio, Nancy ; Toledo, Estefanía ; Estruch, Ramón ; Ros, Emilio ; Martínez-González, Miguel A ; Castañer, Olga ; Bulló, Mònica ; Corella, Dolores ; Arós, Fernando ; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique ; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina ; Fiol, Miquel ; Lapetra, José ; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M ; Serra-Majem, Lluís ; Pintó, Xavier ; Basora, Josep ; Sorlí, José V ; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi ; Babio, Nancy
contributorViñas, C (correspondence author) ; Casas, R (record owner) ; Baena, J M ; Oller, M ; Amat, J ; Duaso, I ; García, Y ; Iglesias, C ; Benavent, J ; Sánchez-Tainta, A ; Toledo, E ; Buil-Cosiales, P ; Serrano-Martínez, M ; Díez-Espino, J ; García-Arellano, A ; Zazpe, I ; Basterra-Gortari, J ; González, R ; Molina, C ; Sorli, M ; García-Roselló, J ; Fernández-Ballart, J ; Castro, A ; Sagarra, R ; Pedret, R ; París, F ; Llauradó, M ; Tello, S ; Vila, J ; Fitó, M ; Schröder, H ; Aros Del Hierro, F ; Algorta, J ; Benítez Pont, R ; Bianchi Alba, M ; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, J ; Gómez-Gracia, E ; García, F J ; Roman, P ; Santos, J M ; Lapetra, J ; Álvarez-Pérez, J ; Díez Benítez, E ; Bautista Castaño, I ; Sánchez-Villegas, A ; Sánchez-Villegas, A ; Sánchez-Villegas, A
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descriptionBACKGROUNDLittle evidence exists on the effect of an energy-unrestricted healthy diet on metabolic syndrome. We evaluated the long-term effect of Mediterranean diets ad libitum on the incidence or reversion of metabolic syndrome. METHODSWe performed a secondary analysis of the PREDIMED trial--a multicentre, randomized trial done between October 2003 and December 2010 that involved men and women (age 55-80 yr) at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary interventions: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts or advice on following a low-fat diet (the control group). The interventions did not include increased physical activity or weight loss as a goal. We analyzed available data from 5801 participants. We determined the effect of diet on incidence and reversion of metabolic syndrome using Cox regression analysis to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTSOver 4.8 years of follow-up, metabolic syndrome developed in 960 (50.0%) of the 1919 participants who did not have the condition at baseline. The risk of developing metabolic syndrome did not differ between participants assigned to the control diet and those assigned to either of the Mediterranean diets (control v. olive oil HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.94-1.30, p = 0.231; control v. nuts HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.92-1.27, p = 0.3). Reversion occurred in 958 (28.2%) of the 3392 participants who had metabolic syndrome at baseline. Compared with the control group, participants on either Mediterranean diet were more likely to undergo reversion (control v. olive oil HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.15-1.58, p < 0.001; control v. nuts HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.08-1.51, p < 0.001). Participants in the group receiving olive oil supplementation showed significant decreases in both central obesity and high fasting glucose (p = 0.02); participants in the group supplemented with nuts showed a significant decrease in central obesity. INTERPRETATIONA Mediterranean diet supplemented with either extra virgin olive oil or nuts is not associated with the onset of metabolic syndrome, but such diets are more likely to cause reversion of the condition. An energy-unrestricted Mediterranean diet may be useful in reducing the risks of central obesity and hyperglycemia in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease. TRIAL REGISTRATIONClinicalTrials.gov, no. ISRCTN35739639.
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15Pintó, Xavier
16Basora, Josep
17Sorlí, José V
18Salas-Salvadó, Jordi
titleMediterranean diets and metabolic syndrome status in the PREDIMED randomized trial.
descriptionBACKGROUNDLittle evidence exists on the effect of an energy-unrestricted healthy diet on metabolic syndrome. We evaluated the long-term effect of Mediterranean diets ad libitum on the incidence or reversion of metabolic syndrome. METHODSWe performed a secondary analysis of the PREDIMED trial--a multicentre, randomized trial done between October 2003 and December 2010 that involved men and women (age 55-80 yr) at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary interventions: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts or advice on following a low-fat diet (the control group). The interventions did not include increased physical activity or weight loss as a goal. We analyzed available data from 5801 participants. We determined the effect of diet on incidence and reversion of metabolic syndrome using Cox regression analysis to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTSOver 4.8 years of follow-up, metabolic syndrome developed in 960 (50.0%) of the 1919 participants who did not have the condition at baseline. The risk of developing metabolic syndrome did not differ between participants assigned to the control diet and those assigned to either of the Mediterranean diets (control v. olive oil HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.94-1.30, p = 0.231; control v. nuts HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.92-1.27, p = 0.3). Reversion occurred in 958 (28.2%) of the 3392 participants who had metabolic syndrome at baseline. Compared with the control group, participants on either Mediterranean diet were more likely to undergo reversion (control v. olive oil HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.15-1.58, p < 0.001; control v. nuts HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.08-1.51, p < 0.001). Participants in the group receiving olive oil supplementation showed significant decreases in both central obesity and high fasting glucose (p = 0.02); participants in the group supplemented with nuts showed a significant decrease in central obesity. INTERPRETATIONA Mediterranean diet supplemented with either extra virgin olive oil or nuts is not associated with the onset of metabolic syndrome, but such diets are more likely to cause reversion of the condition. An energy-unrestricted Mediterranean diet may be useful in reducing the risks of central obesity and hyperglycemia in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease. TRIAL REGISTRATIONClinicalTrials.gov, no. ISRCTN35739639.
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1Aged, 80 and Over–Epidemiology
2Diet, Mediterranean–Prevention & Control
3Female–Prevention & Control
4Follow-Up Studies–Prevention & Control
5Humans–Prevention & Control
6Incidence–Prevention & Control
7Male–Prevention & Control
8Metabolic Syndrome–Prevention & Control
9Middle Aged–Prevention & Control
10Proportional Hazards Models–Prevention & Control
11Treatment Outcome–Prevention & Control
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7Iglesias, C
8Benavent, J
9Sánchez-Tainta, A
10Toledo, E
11Buil-Cosiales, P
12Serrano-Martínez, M
13Díez-Espino, J
14García-Arellano, A
15Zazpe, I
16Basterra-Gortari, J
17González, R
18Molina, C
19Sorli, M
20García-Roselló, J
21Fernández-Ballart, J
22Castro, A
23Sagarra, R
24Pedret, R
25París, F
26Llauradó, M
27Tello, S
28Vila, J
29Fitó, M
30Schröder, H
31Aros Del Hierro, F
32Algorta, J
33Benítez Pont, R
34Bianchi Alba, M
35Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, J
36Gómez-Gracia, E
37García, F J
38Roman, P
39Santos, J M
40Lapetra, J
41Álvarez-Pérez, J
42Díez Benítez, E
43Bautista Castaño, I
44Sánchez-Villegas, A
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citationpf E649 pt E657 vol 186 issue 17
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titleMediterranean diets and metabolic syndrome status in the PREDIMED randomized trial.
authorBabio, Nancy ; Toledo, Estefanía ; Estruch, Ramón ; Ros, Emilio ; Martínez-González, Miguel A ; Castañer, Olga ; Bulló, Mònica ; Corella, Dolores ; Arós, Fernando ; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique ; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina ; Fiol, Miquel ; Lapetra, José ; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M ; Serra-Majem, Lluís ; Pintó, Xavier ; Basora, Josep ; Sorlí, José V ; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi ; Babio, Nancy
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2Diet, Mediterranean–Prevention & Control
3Female–Prevention & Control
4Follow-Up Studies–Prevention & Control
5Humans–Prevention & Control
6Incidence–Prevention & Control
7Male–Prevention & Control
8Metabolic Syndrome–Prevention & Control
9Middle Aged–Prevention & Control
10Proportional Hazards Models–Prevention & Control
11Treatment Outcome–Prevention & Control
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8Arós, Fernando
9Gómez-Gracia, Enrique
10Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina
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12Lapetra, José
13Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M
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30Buil-Cosiales, P
31Serrano-Martínez, M
32Díez-Espino, J
33García-Arellano, A
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35Basterra-Gortari, J
36González, R
37Molina, C
38Sorli, M
39García-Roselló, J
40Fernández-Ballart, J
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42Sagarra, R
43Pedret, R
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47Vila, J
48Fitó, M
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60Álvarez-Pérez, J
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32Algorta, J
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42Díez Benítez, E
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atitleMediterranean diets and metabolic syndrome status in the PREDIMED randomized trial.
jtitleCMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne
risdate20141118
volume186
issue17
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pagesE649-E657
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abstractBACKGROUNDLittle evidence exists on the effect of an energy-unrestricted healthy diet on metabolic syndrome. We evaluated the long-term effect of Mediterranean diets ad libitum on the incidence or reversion of metabolic syndrome. METHODSWe performed a secondary analysis of the PREDIMED trial--a multicentre, randomized trial done between October 2003 and December 2010 that involved men and women (age 55-80 yr) at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary interventions: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts or advice on following a low-fat diet (the control group). The interventions did not include increased physical activity or weight loss as a goal. We analyzed available data from 5801 participants. We determined the effect of diet on incidence and reversion of metabolic syndrome using Cox regression analysis to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTSOver 4.8 years of follow-up, metabolic syndrome developed in 960 (50.0%) of the 1919 participants who did not have the condition at baseline. The risk of developing metabolic syndrome did not differ between participants assigned to the control diet and those assigned to either of the Mediterranean diets (control v. olive oil HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.94-1.30, p = 0.231; control v. nuts HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.92-1.27, p = 0.3). Reversion occurred in 958 (28.2%) of the 3392 participants who had metabolic syndrome at baseline. Compared with the control group, participants on either Mediterranean diet were more likely to undergo reversion (control v. olive oil HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.15-1.58, p < 0.001; control v. nuts HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.08-1.51, p < 0.001). Participants in the group receiving olive oil supplementation showed significant decreases in both central obesity and high fasting glucose (p = 0.02); participants in the group supplemented with nuts showed a significant decrease in central obesity. INTERPRETATIONA Mediterranean diet supplemented with either extra virgin olive oil or nuts is not associated with the onset of metabolic syndrome, but such diets are more likely to cause reversion of the condition. An energy-unrestricted Mediterranean diet may be useful in reducing the risks of central obesity and hyperglycemia in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease. TRIAL REGISTRATIONClinicalTrials.gov, no. ISRCTN35739639.
doi10.1503/cmaj.140764
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1626166274/
issn08203946
date2014-11-18