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Imaging metabolism with hyperpolarized (13)C-labeled cell substrates.

Non-invasive (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of the uptake and subsequent metabolism of (13)C-labeled substrates is a powerful method for studying metabolic fluxes in vivo. However, the technique has been hampered by a lack of sensitivity, which has limited both the spatial and te... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of the American Chemical Society May 27, 2015, Vol.137(20), pp.6418-6427
Main Author: Brindle, Kevin M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1520-5126 ; DOI: 1520-5126 ; DOI: 10.1021/jacs.5b03300
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1683754481/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Imaging metabolism with hyperpolarized (13)C-labeled cell substrates.
format: Article
creator:
  • Brindle, Kevin M
subjects:
  • Carbon Isotopes–Metabolism
  • Humans–Pathology
  • Male–Pathology
  • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular–Pathology
  • Prostatic Neoplasms–Pathology
  • Carbon Isotopes
ispartof: Journal of the American Chemical Society, May 27, 2015, Vol.137(20), pp.6418-6427
description: Non-invasive (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of the uptake and subsequent metabolism of (13)C-labeled substrates is a powerful method for studying metabolic fluxes in vivo. However, the technique has been hampered by a lack of sensitivity, which has limited both the spatial and temporal resolution. The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization in 2003, which by radically enhancing the nuclear spin polarization of (13)C nuclei in solution can increase their sensitivity to detection by more than 10(4)-fold, revolutionized the study of metabolism using magnetic resonance, with temporal and spatial resolutions in the seconds and millimeter ranges, respectively. The principal limitation of the technique is the short half-life of the polarization, which at ∼20-30 s in vivo limits studies to relatively fast metabolic reactions. Nevertheless, pre-clinical studies with a variety of different substrates have demonstrated the potential of the method to provide new insights into tissue metabolism and have paved the way for the first clinical trial of the technique in prostate cancer. The technique now stands on the threshold of more general clinical translation. I consider here what the clinical applications might be, which are the substrates that most likely will be used, how will we analyze the resulting kinetic data, and how we might further increase the levels of polarization and extend polarization lifetime.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1520-5126 ; DOI: 1520-5126 ; DOI: 10.1021/jacs.5b03300
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 15205126
  • 1520-5126
url: Link


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titleImaging metabolism with hyperpolarized (13)C-labeled cell substrates.
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descriptionNon-invasive (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of the uptake and subsequent metabolism of (13)C-labeled substrates is a powerful method for studying metabolic fluxes in vivo. However, the technique has been hampered by a lack of sensitivity, which has limited both the spatial and temporal resolution. The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization in 2003, which by radically enhancing the nuclear spin polarization of (13)C nuclei in solution can increase their sensitivity to detection by more than 10(4)-fold, revolutionized the study of metabolism using magnetic resonance, with temporal and spatial resolutions in the seconds and millimeter ranges, respectively. The principal limitation of the technique is the short half-life of the polarization, which at ∼20-30 s in vivo limits studies to relatively fast metabolic reactions. Nevertheless, pre-clinical studies with a variety of different substrates have demonstrated the potential of the method to provide new insights into tissue metabolism and have paved the way for the first clinical trial of the technique in prostate cancer. The technique now stands on the threshold of more general clinical translation. I consider here what the clinical applications might be, which are the substrates that most likely will be used, how will we analyze the resulting kinetic data, and how we might further increase the levels of polarization and extend polarization lifetime.
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