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AIDS treatment and mental health: Evidence from Uganda

Increased access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in developing countries over the last decade is believed to have contributed to reductions in HIV transmission and improvements in life expectancy. While numerous studies document the effects of ART on physical health and functioning, comparatively le... Full description

Journal Title: Social Science & Medicine September 2013, Vol.92, pp.27-34
Main Author: Okeke, Edward
Other Authors: Wagner, Glenn
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0277-9536 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.05.018
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1692288734/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest1692288734
title: AIDS treatment and mental health: Evidence from Uganda
format: Article
creator:
  • Okeke, Edward
  • Wagner, Glenn
subjects:
  • Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
  • Depression (Psychology)
  • Mental Health Services
  • Medications
  • Uganda
  • Patients
  • Developing Countries
  • Treatment Outcomes
  • Health Problems
  • Sociology of Health and Medicine
  • Sociology of Medicine & Health Care
  • HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Mental Health Africa
  • Article
ispartof: Social Science & Medicine, September 2013, Vol.92, pp.27-34
description: Increased access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in developing countries over the last decade is believed to have contributed to reductions in HIV transmission and improvements in life expectancy. While numerous studies document the effects of ART on physical health and functioning, comparatively less attention has been paid to the effects of ART on mental health outcomes. In this paper we study the impact of ART on depression in a cohort of patients in Uganda entering HIV care. We find that 12 months after beginning ART, the prevalence of major and minor depression in the treatment group had fallen by approximately 15 and 27 percentage points respectively relative to a comparison group of patients in HIV care but not receiving ART. We also find some evidence that ART helps to close the well-known gender gap in depression between men and women. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0277-9536 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.05.018
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 02779536
  • 0277-9536
url: Link


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identifierISSN: 0277-9536 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.05.018
subjectAcquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ; Depression (Psychology) ; Mental Health Services ; Medications ; Uganda ; Patients ; Developing Countries ; Treatment Outcomes ; Health Problems ; Sociology of Health and Medicine; Sociology of Medicine & Health Care ; HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Mental Health Africa ; Article
descriptionIncreased access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in developing countries over the last decade is believed to have contributed to reductions in HIV transmission and improvements in life expectancy. While numerous studies document the effects of ART on physical health and functioning, comparatively less attention has been paid to the effects of ART on mental health outcomes. In this paper we study the impact of ART on depression in a cohort of patients in Uganda entering HIV care. We find that 12 months after beginning ART, the prevalence of major and minor depression in the treatment group had fallen by approximately 15 and 27 percentage points respectively relative to a comparison group of patients in HIV care but not receiving ART. We also find some evidence that ART helps to close the well-known gender gap in depression between men and women. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
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abstractIncreased access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in developing countries over the last decade is believed to have contributed to reductions in HIV transmission and improvements in life expectancy. While numerous studies document the effects of ART on physical health and functioning, comparatively less attention has been paid to the effects of ART on mental health outcomes. In this paper we study the impact of ART on depression in a cohort of patients in Uganda entering HIV care. We find that 12 months after beginning ART, the prevalence of major and minor depression in the treatment group had fallen by approximately 15 and 27 percentage points respectively relative to a comparison group of patients in HIV care but not receiving ART. We also find some evidence that ART helps to close the well-known gender gap in depression between men and women. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
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