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The human microbiome.

Diet composition measurably and reproducibly alters the human microbiome. Unlike plant-based diets, diets that are exclusively animal-based cause shortterm changes in the composition of the fecal microbiome and metabolites associated with inflammatory and neoplastic disease.4 The use of antibiotics... Full description

Journal Title: CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne Vol.187(11), p.825
Main Author: Coburn, Bryan
Other Authors: Guttman, David S
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Created: August 11, 2015
ID: E-ISSN: 1488-2329 ; DOI: 1488-2329 ; DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.141072
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1703698335/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest1703698335
title: The human microbiome.
format: Article
creator:
  • Coburn, Bryan
  • Guttman, David S
subjects:
  • Bacterial Infections–Microbiology
  • Diet–Physiopathology
  • Exercise–Physiology
  • Health Status–Immunology
  • Humans–Immunology
  • Immunocompetence–Physiology
  • Life Style–Administration & Dosage
  • Microbiota–Administration & Dosage
  • Probiotics–Administration & Dosage
  • Risk Factors–Administration & Dosage
  • Sensitivity and Specificity–Administration & Dosage
  • Abridged
ispartof: CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne, Vol.187(11), p.825
description: Diet composition measurably and reproducibly alters the human microbiome. Unlike plant-based diets, diets that are exclusively animal-based cause shortterm changes in the composition of the fecal microbiome and metabolites associated with inflammatory and neoplastic disease.4 The use of antibiotics is associated with substantial loss of richness and diversity in the fecal microbiome that can last days to months, and the microbiome may never fully recover after the treatment ends.5 In a randomized controlled trial involving patients who had a relapse of C. difficile infection after at least one course of treatment with antibiotics, transplantation of stool from healthy donors to these patients was found to be an effective treatment, with 81% efficacy after a single administration.6 Probiotics have the potential to affect the structure and function of the microbiome, but the efficacy and durability of their effects varies by disease and probiotic formulation. Treating infectious and noninfectious diseases using microbiota transplantation is an area of active and expanding investigation.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1488-2329 ; DOI: 1488-2329 ; DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.141072
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 14882329
  • 1488-2329
url: Link


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subjectBacterial Infections–Microbiology ; Diet–Physiopathology ; Exercise–Physiology ; Health Status–Immunology ; Humans–Immunology ; Immunocompetence–Physiology ; Life Style–Administration & Dosage ; Microbiota–Administration & Dosage ; Probiotics–Administration & Dosage ; Risk Factors–Administration & Dosage ; Sensitivity and Specificity–Administration & Dosage ; Abridged
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descriptionDiet composition measurably and reproducibly alters the human microbiome. Unlike plant-based diets, diets that are exclusively animal-based cause shortterm changes in the composition of the fecal microbiome and metabolites associated with inflammatory and neoplastic disease.4 The use of antibiotics is associated with substantial loss of richness and diversity in the fecal microbiome that can last days to months, and the microbiome may never fully recover after the treatment ends.5 In a randomized controlled trial involving patients who had a relapse of C. difficile infection after at least one course of treatment with antibiotics, transplantation of stool from healthy donors to these patients was found to be an effective treatment, with 81% efficacy after a single administration.6 Probiotics have the potential to affect the structure and function of the microbiome, but the efficacy and durability of their effects varies by disease and probiotic formulation. Treating infectious and noninfectious diseases using microbiota transplantation is an area of active and expanding investigation.
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