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A Comparison of Different Methods for Evaluating Diet, Physical Activity, and Long-Term Weight Gain in 3 Prospective Cohort Studies.

BACKGROUNDThe insidious pace of long-term weight gain (∼ 1 lb/y or 0.45 kg/y) makes it difficult to study in trials; long-term prospective cohorts provide crucial evidence on its key contributors. Most previous studies have evaluated how prevalent lifestyle habits relate to future weight gain rather... Full description

Journal Title: The Journal of nutrition November 2015, Vol.145(11), pp.2527-2534
Main Author: Smith, Jessica D
Other Authors: Hou, Tao , Hu, Frank B , Rimm, Eric B , Spiegelman, Donna , Willett, Walter C , Mozaffarian, Dariush
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved
ID: E-ISSN: 1541-6100 ; DOI: 10.3945/jn.115.214171
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1730020987/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: A Comparison of Different Methods for Evaluating Diet, Physical Activity, and Long-Term Weight Gain in 3 Prospective Cohort Studies.
format: Article
creator:
  • Smith, Jessica D
  • Hou, Tao
  • Hu, Frank B
  • Rimm, Eric B
  • Spiegelman, Donna
  • Willett, Walter C
  • Mozaffarian, Dariush
subjects:
  • Adult–Analysis
  • Beverages–Administration & Dosage
  • Body Mass Index–Methods
  • Carbohydrates–Methods
  • Diet–Methods
  • Female–Methods
  • Follow-Up Studies–Methods
  • Health Impact Assessment–Methods
  • Humans–Methods
  • Life Style–Methods
  • Male–Methods
  • Middle Aged–Methods
  • Motor Activity–Methods
  • Nutrition Assessment–Methods
  • Prospective Studies–Methods
  • Sensitivity and Specificity–Methods
  • Surveys and Questionnaires–Methods
  • Weight Gain–Methods
  • Carbohydrates
ispartof: The Journal of nutrition, November 2015, Vol.145(11), pp.2527-2534
description: BACKGROUNDThe insidious pace of long-term weight gain (∼ 1 lb/y or 0.45 kg/y) makes it difficult to study in trials; long-term prospective cohorts provide crucial evidence on its key contributors. Most previous studies have evaluated how prevalent lifestyle habits relate to future weight gain rather than to lifestyle changes, which may be more temporally and physiologically relevant. OBJECTIVEOur objective was to evaluate and compare different methodological approaches for investigating diet, physical activity (PA), and long-term weight gain. METHODSIn 3 prospective cohorts (total n = 117,992), we assessed how lifestyle relates to long-term weight change (up to 24 y of follow-up) in 4-y periods by comparing 3 analytic approaches: 1) prevalent diet and PA and 4-y weight change (prevalent analysis); 2) 4-y changes in diet and PA with a 4-y weight change (change analysis); and 3) 4-y change in diet and PA with weight change in the subsequent 4 y (lagged-change analysis). We compared these...
language: eng
source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved
identifier: E-ISSN: 1541-6100 ; DOI: 10.3945/jn.115.214171
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 15416100
  • 1541-6100
url: Link


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titleA Comparison of Different Methods for Evaluating Diet, Physical Activity, and Long-Term Weight Gain in 3 Prospective Cohort Studies.
creatorSmith, Jessica D ; Hou, Tao ; Hu, Frank B ; Rimm, Eric B ; Spiegelman, Donna ; Willett, Walter C ; Mozaffarian, Dariush
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identifierE-ISSN: 1541-6100 ; DOI: 10.3945/jn.115.214171
subjectAdult–Analysis ; Beverages–Administration & Dosage ; Body Mass Index–Methods ; Carbohydrates–Methods ; Diet–Methods ; Female–Methods ; Follow-Up Studies–Methods ; Health Impact Assessment–Methods ; Humans–Methods ; Life Style–Methods ; Male–Methods ; Middle Aged–Methods ; Motor Activity–Methods ; Nutrition Assessment–Methods ; Prospective Studies–Methods ; Sensitivity and Specificity–Methods ; Surveys and Questionnaires–Methods ; Weight Gain–Methods ; Carbohydrates
descriptionBACKGROUNDThe insidious pace of long-term weight gain (∼ 1 lb/y or 0.45 kg/y) makes it difficult to study in trials; long-term prospective cohorts provide crucial evidence on its key contributors. Most previous studies have evaluated how prevalent lifestyle habits relate to future weight gain rather than to lifestyle changes, which may be more temporally and physiologically relevant. OBJECTIVEOur objective was to evaluate and compare different methodological approaches for investigating diet, physical activity (PA), and long-term weight gain. METHODSIn 3 prospective cohorts (total n = 117,992), we assessed how lifestyle relates to long-term weight change (up to 24 y of follow-up) in 4-y periods by comparing 3 analytic approaches: 1) prevalent diet and PA and 4-y weight change (prevalent analysis); 2) 4-y changes in diet and PA with a 4-y weight change (change analysis); and 3) 4-y change in diet and PA with weight change in the subsequent 4 y (lagged-change analysis). We compared these...
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titleA Comparison of Different Methods for Evaluating Diet, Physical Activity, and Long-Term Weight Gain in 3 Prospective Cohort Studies.
descriptionBACKGROUNDThe insidious pace of long-term weight gain (∼ 1 lb/y or 0.45 kg/y) makes it difficult to study in trials; long-term prospective cohorts provide crucial evidence on its key contributors. Most previous studies have evaluated how prevalent lifestyle habits relate to future weight gain rather than to lifestyle changes, which may be more temporally and physiologically relevant. OBJECTIVEOur objective was to evaluate and compare different methodological approaches for investigating diet, physical activity (PA), and long-term weight gain. METHODSIn 3 prospective cohorts (total n = 117,992), we assessed how lifestyle relates to long-term weight change (up to 24 y of follow-up) in 4-y periods by comparing 3 analytic approaches: 1) prevalent diet and PA and 4-y weight change (prevalent analysis); 2) 4-y changes in diet and PA with a 4-y weight change (change analysis); and 3) 4-y change in diet and PA with weight change in the subsequent 4 y (lagged-change analysis). We compared these...
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titleA Comparison of Different Methods for Evaluating Diet, Physical Activity, and Long-Term Weight Gain in 3 Prospective Cohort Studies.
authorSmith, Jessica D ; Hou, Tao ; Hu, Frank B ; Rimm, Eric B ; Spiegelman, Donna ; Willett, Walter C ; Mozaffarian, Dariush
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abstractBACKGROUNDThe insidious pace of long-term weight gain (∼ 1 lb/y or 0.45 kg/y) makes it difficult to study in trials; long-term prospective cohorts provide crucial evidence on its key contributors. Most previous studies have evaluated how prevalent lifestyle habits relate to future weight gain rather than to lifestyle changes, which may be more temporally and physiologically relevant. OBJECTIVEOur objective was to evaluate and compare different methodological approaches for investigating diet, physical activity (PA), and long-term weight gain. METHODSIn 3 prospective cohorts (total n = 117,992), we assessed how lifestyle relates to long-term weight change (up to 24 y of follow-up) in 4-y periods by comparing 3 analytic approaches: 1) prevalent diet and PA and 4-y weight change (prevalent analysis); 2) 4-y changes in diet and PA with a 4-y weight change (change analysis); and 3) 4-y change in diet and PA with weight change in the subsequent 4 y (lagged-change analysis). We compared these...
doi10.3945/jn.115.214171
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1730020987/
date2015-11-01