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Developmental changes in the primacy of facial cues for emotion recognition

There have been long-standing differences of opinion regarding the influence of the face relative to that of contextual information on how individuals process and judge facial expressions of emotion. However, developmental changes in how individuals use such information have remained largely unexplo... Full description

Journal Title: Developmental Psychology Apr 2016, Vol.52(4), pp.572-581
Main Author: Leitzke, Brian T.
Other Authors: Pollak, Seth D.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0012-1649 ; E-ISSN: 1939-0599 ; DOI: 1939-0599 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0040067
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1758166573/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Developmental changes in the primacy of facial cues for emotion recognition
format: Article
creator:
  • Leitzke, Brian T.
  • Pollak, Seth D.
subjects:
  • Age Differences
  • Cues
  • Facial Expressions
  • Judgment
  • Emotion Recognition
  • Childhood Development
  • Eye Fixation
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Development
  • Context
  • Emotion Perception
  • Facial Expressions
  • Gaze Patterns
  • Empirical Study
  • Quantitative Study
  • Human
  • Male
  • Female
  • Childhood (Birth-12 Yrs)
  • Preschool Age (2-5 Yrs)
  • School Age (6-12 Yrs)
  • Adulthood (18 Yrs & Older)
  • Article
ispartof: Developmental Psychology, Apr 2016, Vol.52(4), pp.572-581
description: There have been long-standing differences of opinion regarding the influence of the face relative to that of contextual information on how individuals process and judge facial expressions of emotion. However, developmental changes in how individuals use such information have remained largely unexplored and could be informative in attempting to reconcile these opposing views. The current study tested for age-related differences in how individuals prioritize viewing emotional faces versus contexts when making emotion judgments. To do so, we asked 4-, 8-, and 12-year-old children as well as college students to categorize facial expressions of emotion that were presented with scenes that were either congruent or incongruent with the facial displays. During this time, we recorded participants’ gaze patterns via eye tracking. College students directed their visual attention primarily to the face, regardless of contextual information. Children, however, divided their attention between both the face and the context as sources of emotional information depending on the valence of the context. These findings reveal a developmental shift in how individuals process and integrate emotional cues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0012-1649 ; E-ISSN: 1939-0599 ; DOI: 1939-0599 ; DOI: 10.1037/a0040067
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00121649
  • 0012-1649
  • 19390599
  • 1939-0599
url: Link


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titleDevelopmental changes in the primacy of facial cues for emotion recognition
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descriptionThere have been long-standing differences of opinion regarding the influence of the face relative to that of contextual information on how individuals process and judge facial expressions of emotion. However, developmental changes in how individuals use such information have remained largely unexplored and could be informative in attempting to reconcile these opposing views. The current study tested for age-related differences in how individuals prioritize viewing emotional faces versus contexts when making emotion judgments. To do so, we asked 4-, 8-, and 12-year-old children as well as college students to categorize facial expressions of emotion that were presented with scenes that were either congruent or incongruent with the facial displays. During this time, we recorded participants’ gaze patterns via eye tracking. College students directed their visual attention primarily to the face, regardless of contextual information. Children, however, divided their attention between both the face and the context as sources of emotional information depending on the valence of the context. These findings reveal a developmental shift in how individuals process and integrate emotional cues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)
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abstractThere have been long-standing differences of opinion regarding the influence of the face relative to that of contextual information on how individuals process and judge facial expressions of emotion. However, developmental changes in how individuals use such information have remained largely unexplored and could be informative in attempting to reconcile these opposing views. The current study tested for age-related differences in how individuals prioritize viewing emotional faces versus contexts when making emotion judgments. To do so, we asked 4-, 8-, and 12-year-old children as well as college students to categorize facial expressions of emotion that were presented with scenes that were either congruent or incongruent with the facial displays. During this time, we recorded participants’ gaze patterns via eye tracking. College students directed their visual attention primarily to the face, regardless of contextual information. Children, however, divided their attention between both the face and the context as sources of emotional information depending on the valence of the context. These findings reveal a developmental shift in how individuals process and integrate emotional cues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)
pubAmerican Psychological Association
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date2016-04-01