schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Microbial yield from physiotherapy assisted sputum production in respiratory outpatients

Background Sputum is a key diagnostic sample for those with chronic chest conditions including chronic and allergic aspergillus-related disease, but often not obtained in clinic. The objective of this study was to evaluate physiotherapeutic interventions to obtain sputum from those not able to spont... Full description

Journal Title: BMC Pulmonary Medicine 2016, Vol.16
Main Author: Langridge, Philip
Other Authors: Sheehan, Reyenna , Denning, David , Langridge, Philip , Sheehan, Reyenna , Denning, David
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 14712466 ; DOI: 10.1186/s12890-016-0188-2
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: proquest1773654665
title: Microbial yield from physiotherapy assisted sputum production in respiratory outpatients
format: Article
creator:
  • Langridge, Philip
  • Sheehan, Reyenna
  • Denning, David
  • Langridge, Philip
  • Sheehan, Reyenna
  • Denning, David
subjects:
  • Sputum
  • Induced
  • Physiotherapy
  • Aspergillus
  • Hypertonic
ispartof: BMC Pulmonary Medicine, 2016, Vol.16
description: Background Sputum is a key diagnostic sample for those with chronic chest conditions including chronic and allergic aspergillus-related disease, but often not obtained in clinic. The objective of this study was to evaluate physiotherapeutic interventions to obtain sputum from those not able to spontaneously produce and the subsequent microbiological result. Methods Sputum samples were collected by physiotherapists from patients attending routine outpatient clinics managing their aspergillus-related diseases who were unable to spontaneously produce. Active Cycle of Breathing Techniques (ACBT) technique was applied first, for 10 min, followed by hypertonic saline induction using a Pari LC plus or Pari Sprint nebuliser, if necessary and deemed safe to do so. Samples processed in the laboratory using standard microbiological techniques for bacterial and fungal culture with the addition of Aspergillus real-time PCR. Results Samples were procured from 353 of 364 (97 %) patients, 231 (65 %) by ACBT and 119 (34 %) with administration of hypertonic saline. Three of 125 (2.4 %) patients had significant bronchospasm during sputum induction. Sixteen patients' sputum tested positive for Aspergillus culture, contrasting with 82 whose Aspergillus PCR was positive, 59 with a strong signal. PCR improved detection of Aspergillus by 350 %. Sputum from 124 (34 %) patients cultured other potentially pathogenic organisms which justified specific therapy. Conclusions Physiotherapeutic interventions safely and effectively procured sputum from patients unable to spontaneously produce. The method for sputum induction was well-tolerated and time-efficient, with important microbiological results.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 14712466 ; DOI: 10.1186/s12890-016-0188-2
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 14712466
  • 1471-2466
url: Link


@attributes
ID1642914904
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid1773654665
sourceidproquest
recordidTN_proquest1773654665
sourcesystemOther
pqid1773654665
galeid443251439
display
typearticle
titleMicrobial yield from physiotherapy assisted sputum production in respiratory outpatients
creatorLangridge, Philip ; Sheehan, Reyenna ; Denning, David ; Langridge, Philip ; Sheehan, Reyenna ; Denning, David
ispartofBMC Pulmonary Medicine, 2016, Vol.16
identifierE-ISSN: 14712466 ; DOI: 10.1186/s12890-016-0188-2
subjectSputum ; Induced ; Physiotherapy ; Aspergillus ; Hypertonic
descriptionBackground Sputum is a key diagnostic sample for those with chronic chest conditions including chronic and allergic aspergillus-related disease, but often not obtained in clinic. The objective of this study was to evaluate physiotherapeutic interventions to obtain sputum from those not able to spontaneously produce and the subsequent microbiological result. Methods Sputum samples were collected by physiotherapists from patients attending routine outpatient clinics managing their aspergillus-related diseases who were unable to spontaneously produce. Active Cycle of Breathing Techniques (ACBT) technique was applied first, for 10 min, followed by hypertonic saline induction using a Pari LC plus or Pari Sprint nebuliser, if necessary and deemed safe to do so. Samples processed in the laboratory using standard microbiological techniques for bacterial and fungal culture with the addition of Aspergillus real-time PCR. Results Samples were procured from 353 of 364 (97 %) patients, 231 (65 %) by ACBT and 119 (34 %) with administration of hypertonic saline. Three of 125 (2.4 %) patients had significant bronchospasm during sputum induction. Sixteen patients' sputum tested positive for Aspergillus culture, contrasting with 82 whose Aspergillus PCR was positive, 59 with a strong signal. PCR improved detection of Aspergillus by 350 %. Sputum from 124 (34 %) patients cultured other potentially pathogenic organisms which justified specific therapy. Conclusions Physiotherapeutic interventions safely and effectively procured sputum from patients unable to spontaneously produce. The method for sputum induction was well-tolerated and time-efficient, with important microbiological results.
languageeng
source
version7
oafree_for_read
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
linktorsrc$$Uhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1773654665/?pq-origsite=primo$$EView_record_in_ProQuest_(subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontrib
0Langridge, Philip
1Sheehan, Reyenna
2Denning, David
titleMicrobial yield from physiotherapy assisted sputum production in respiratory outpatients
descriptionBackground Sputum is a key diagnostic sample for those with chronic chest conditions including chronic and allergic aspergillus-related disease, but often not obtained in clinic. The objective of this study was to evaluate physiotherapeutic interventions to obtain sputum from those not able to spontaneously produce and the subsequent microbiological result. Methods Sputum samples were collected by physiotherapists from patients attending routine outpatient clinics managing their aspergillus-related diseases who were unable to spontaneously produce. Active Cycle of Breathing Techniques (ACBT) technique was applied first, for 10 min, followed by hypertonic saline induction using a Pari LC plus or Pari Sprint nebuliser, if necessary and deemed safe to do so. Samples processed in the laboratory using standard microbiological techniques for bacterial and fungal culture with the addition of Aspergillus real-time PCR. Results Samples were procured from 353 of 364 (97 %) patients, 231 (65 %) by ACBT and 119 (34 %) with administration of hypertonic saline. Three of 125 (2.4 %) patients had significant bronchospasm during sputum induction. Sixteen patients' sputum tested positive for Aspergillus culture, contrasting with 82 whose Aspergillus PCR was positive, 59 with a strong signal. PCR improved detection of Aspergillus by 350 %. Sputum from 124 (34 %) patients cultured other potentially pathogenic organisms which justified specific therapy. Conclusions Physiotherapeutic interventions safely and effectively procured sputum from patients unable to spontaneously produce. The method for sputum induction was well-tolerated and time-efficient, with important microbiological results.
subject
0Sputum
1Induced
2Physiotherapy
3Aspergillus
4Hypertonic
general
0English
1BioMed Central
210.1186/s12890-016-0188-2
3Medical Database
4Health & Medical Collection (Alumni edition)
5Medical Database (Alumni edition)
6Health & Medical Collection
7Publicly Available Content Database
8ProQuest Biological Science Collection
9ProQuest Central
10ProQuest Hospital Collection
11ProQuest Natural Science Collection
12Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
13ProQuest SciTech Collection
14ProQuest Health & Medical Complete
15ProQuest Medical Library
16Biological Science Database
17Natural Science Collection
18ProQuest Central (new)
19ProQuest Central Korea
20SciTech Premium Collection
21Health Research Premium Collection
22Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
23ProQuest Central Essentials
24ProQuest Central China
sourceidproquest
recordidproquest1773654665
issn
014712466
11471-2466
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2016
addtitleBMC Pulmonary Medicine
searchscope
01000273
11006761
21006762
31007067
41007552
51007945
61008886
71009127
81009240
91009386
1010000002
1110000004
1210000038
1310000039
1410000047
1510000050
1610000118
1710000119
1810000120
1910000155
2010000156
2110000157
2210000158
2310000198
2410000209
2510000217
2610000238
2710000253
2810000255
2910000256
3010000258
3110000260
3210000270
3310000271
3410000281
3510000300
3610000302
37proquest
scope
01000273
11006761
21006762
31007067
41007552
51007945
61008886
71009127
81009240
91009386
1010000002
1110000004
1210000038
1310000039
1410000047
1510000050
1610000118
1710000119
1810000120
1910000155
2010000156
2110000157
2210000158
2310000198
2410000209
2510000217
2610000238
2710000253
2810000255
2910000256
3010000258
3110000260
3210000270
3310000271
3410000281
3510000300
3610000302
37proquest
lsr43
01000273true
11006761true
21006762true
31007067true
41007552false
51007945true
61008886true
71009127true
81009240true
91009386true
1010000002false
1110000004false
1210000038false
1310000039true
1410000047true
1510000050false
1610000118true
1710000119true
1810000120false
1910000155true
2010000156true
2110000157true
2210000158true
2310000198false
2410000209false
2510000217false
2610000238false
2710000253false
2810000255true
2910000256true
3010000258true
3110000260false
3210000270true
3310000271true
3410000281true
3510000300true
3610000302true
startdate20160101
enddate20160101
citationvol 16
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pages, date, pqid, issue, galeid]
sort
titleMicrobial yield from physiotherapy assisted sputum production in respiratory outpatients
authorLangridge, Philip ; Sheehan, Reyenna ; Denning, David ; Langridge, Philip ; Sheehan, Reyenna ; Denning, David
creationdate20160101
lso0120160101
facets
frbrgroupid7258518650763527595
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2016
topic
0Sputum
1Induced
2Physiotherapy
3Aspergillus
4Hypertonic
collection
0Medical Database
1Health & Medical Collection (Alumni edition)
2Medical Database (Alumni edition)
3Health & Medical Collection
4Publicly Available Content Database
5ProQuest Biological Science Collection
6ProQuest Central
7ProQuest Hospital Collection
8ProQuest Natural Science Collection
9Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
10ProQuest SciTech Collection
11ProQuest Health & Medical Complete
12ProQuest Medical Library
13Biological Science Database
14Natural Science Collection
15ProQuest Central (new)
16ProQuest Central Korea
17SciTech Premium Collection
18Health Research Premium Collection
19Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
20ProQuest Central Essentials
21ProQuest Central China
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Langridge, Philip
1Sheehan, Reyenna
2Denning, David
jtitleBMC Pulmonary Medicine
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext_linktorsrc
addata
aulast
0Langridge
1Sheehan
2Denning
aufirst
0Philip
1Reyenna
2David
au
0Langridge, Philip
1Sheehan, Reyenna
2Denning, David
atitleMicrobial yield from physiotherapy assisted sputum production in respiratory outpatients
jtitleBMC Pulmonary Medicine
risdate20160101
volume16
eissn14712466
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractBackground Sputum is a key diagnostic sample for those with chronic chest conditions including chronic and allergic aspergillus-related disease, but often not obtained in clinic. The objective of this study was to evaluate physiotherapeutic interventions to obtain sputum from those not able to spontaneously produce and the subsequent microbiological result. Methods Sputum samples were collected by physiotherapists from patients attending routine outpatient clinics managing their aspergillus-related diseases who were unable to spontaneously produce. Active Cycle of Breathing Techniques (ACBT) technique was applied first, for 10 min, followed by hypertonic saline induction using a Pari LC plus or Pari Sprint nebuliser, if necessary and deemed safe to do so. Samples processed in the laboratory using standard microbiological techniques for bacterial and fungal culture with the addition of Aspergillus real-time PCR. Results Samples were procured from 353 of 364 (97 %) patients, 231 (65 %) by ACBT and 119 (34 %) with administration of hypertonic saline. Three of 125 (2.4 %) patients had significant bronchospasm during sputum induction. Sixteen patients' sputum tested positive for Aspergillus culture, contrasting with 82 whose Aspergillus PCR was positive, 59 with a strong signal. PCR improved detection of Aspergillus by 350 %. Sputum from 124 (34 %) patients cultured other potentially pathogenic organisms which justified specific therapy. Conclusions Physiotherapeutic interventions safely and effectively procured sputum from patients unable to spontaneously produce. The method for sputum induction was well-tolerated and time-efficient, with important microbiological results.
copLondon
pubBioMed Central
doi10.1186/s12890-016-0188-2
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1773654665/
pages23
issue23
oafree_for_read
date2016-02-02