schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Increased Posterior Hippocampal Volumes in Children with Lower Increase in Body Mass Index: A 3-Year Longitudinal MRI Study

People are generally lean during childhood and show more variability in body sizes and shapes later in life. Cortical development generally correlates with body growth. However, in children cortical growth may be impaired with oversized body growth. Inverse correlations between body mass index (BMI)... Full description

Journal Title: Developmental Neuroscience April 2015, Vol.37(2), pp.153-160
Main Author: Hashimoto, Teruo
Other Authors: Takeuchi, Hikaru , Taki, Yasuyuki , Yokota, Susumu , Hashizume, Hiroshi , Asano, Kohei , Asano, Michiko , Sassa, Yuko , Nouchi, Rui , Kawashima, Ryuta
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Age
ID: ISSN: 0378-5866 ; E-ISSN: 1421-9859 ; DOI: 10.1159/000370064
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1776662461/
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: proquest1776662461
title: Increased Posterior Hippocampal Volumes in Children with Lower Increase in Body Mass Index: A 3-Year Longitudinal MRI Study
format: Article
creator:
  • Hashimoto, Teruo
  • Takeuchi, Hikaru
  • Taki, Yasuyuki
  • Yokota, Susumu
  • Hashizume, Hiroshi
  • Asano, Kohei
  • Asano, Michiko
  • Sassa, Yuko
  • Nouchi, Rui
  • Kawashima, Ryuta
subjects:
  • Temporal Lobe
  • Age
  • Hippocampus
  • Adolescence
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Brain
  • Development
  • Children
  • Nervous System
  • Morphometry
  • Body Size
  • Parahippocampal Gyrus
  • Body Mass Index
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Development
  • Hippocampus
  • Parahippocampal Gyrus
  • Voxel-Based Morphometry
ispartof: Developmental Neuroscience, April 2015, Vol.37(2), pp.153-160
description: People are generally lean during childhood and show more variability in body sizes and shapes later in life. Cortical development generally correlates with body growth. However, in children cortical growth may be impaired with oversized body growth. Inverse correlations between body mass index (BMI) and brain volumes suggest that lean bodies may be associated with increased cortical volume. To clarify the positive effects of a lean body on a child's cortical development, we used MRI to measure brain structures longitudinally in 107 children and adolescents aged 5-16 years. The relationships between changes in BMI and cortical volumes during 3 years of development were investigated, while controlling for age, gender and intracranial volume changes. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that an increase in the volume of the right posterior medial temporal lobe - including the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus - was associated with lower BMI increases. No correlations were observed between higher BMI increases and cortical volumes. Our results suggest that keeping a lean body - or not getting fat - during childhood can induce an increase in regional cortical volume rather than impair growth. This is the first longitudinal study showing positive effects of a lean body on cortical development in children. copyright 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0378-5866 ; E-ISSN: 1421-9859 ; DOI: 10.1159/000370064
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 03785866
  • 0378-5866
  • 14219859
  • 1421-9859
url: Link


@attributes
ID237426973
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid1776662461
sourceidproquest
recordidTN_proquest1776662461
sourcesystemPC
pqid1776662461
display
typearticle
titleIncreased Posterior Hippocampal Volumes in Children with Lower Increase in Body Mass Index: A 3-Year Longitudinal MRI Study
creatorHashimoto, Teruo ; Takeuchi, Hikaru ; Taki, Yasuyuki ; Yokota, Susumu ; Hashizume, Hiroshi ; Asano, Kohei ; Asano, Michiko ; Sassa, Yuko ; Nouchi, Rui ; Kawashima, Ryuta
contributorHashimoto, Teruo (correspondence author)
ispartofDevelopmental Neuroscience, April 2015, Vol.37(2), pp.153-160
identifier
subjectTemporal Lobe ; Age ; Hippocampus ; Adolescence ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Brain ; Development ; Children ; Nervous System ; Morphometry ; Body Size ; Parahippocampal Gyrus ; Body Mass Index ; Developmental Neuroscience ; Development ; Hippocampus ; Parahippocampal Gyrus ; Voxel-Based Morphometry
descriptionPeople are generally lean during childhood and show more variability in body sizes and shapes later in life. Cortical development generally correlates with body growth. However, in children cortical growth may be impaired with oversized body growth. Inverse correlations between body mass index (BMI) and brain volumes suggest that lean bodies may be associated with increased cortical volume. To clarify the positive effects of a lean body on a child's cortical development, we used MRI to measure brain structures longitudinally in 107 children and adolescents aged 5-16 years. The relationships between changes in BMI and cortical volumes during 3 years of development were investigated, while controlling for age, gender and intracranial volume changes. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that an increase in the volume of the right posterior medial temporal lobe - including the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus - was associated with lower BMI increases. No correlations were observed between higher BMI increases and cortical volumes. Our results suggest that keeping a lean body - or not getting fat - during childhood can induce an increase in regional cortical volume rather than impair growth. This is the first longitudinal study showing positive effects of a lean body on cortical development in children. copyright 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel
languageeng
source
version6
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
backlink$$Uhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1776662461/$$EView_record_in_ProQuest_(subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontrib
0Hashimoto, Teruo
1Takeuchi, Hikaru
2Taki, Yasuyuki
3Yokota, Susumu
4Hashizume, Hiroshi
5Asano, Kohei
6Asano, Michiko
7Sassa, Yuko
8Nouchi, Rui
9Kawashima, Ryuta
titleIncreased Posterior Hippocampal Volumes in Children with Lower Increase in Body Mass Index: A 3-Year Longitudinal MRI Study
descriptionPeople are generally lean during childhood and show more variability in body sizes and shapes later in life. Cortical development generally correlates with body growth. However, in children cortical growth may be impaired with oversized body growth. Inverse correlations between body mass index (BMI) and brain volumes suggest that lean bodies may be associated with increased cortical volume. To clarify the positive effects of a lean body on a child's cortical development, we used MRI to measure brain structures longitudinally in 107 children and adolescents aged 5-16 years. The relationships between changes in BMI and cortical volumes during 3 years of development were investigated, while controlling for age, gender and intracranial volume changes. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that an increase in the volume of the right posterior medial temporal lobe - including the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus - was associated with lower BMI increases. No correlations were observed between higher BMI increases and cortical volumes. Our results suggest that keeping a lean body - or not getting fat - during childhood can induce an increase in regional cortical volume rather than impair growth. This is the first longitudinal study showing positive effects of a lean body on cortical development in children. copyright 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel
subject
0Temporal Lobe
1Age
2Hippocampus
3Adolescence
4Magnetic Resonance Imaging
5Brain
6Development
7Children
8Nervous System
9Morphometry
10Body Size
11Parahippocampal Gyrus
12Body Mass Index
13Developmental Neuroscience
14Voxel-Based Morphometry
15N3 11003
16Parahippocampal gyrus
17Voxel-based morphometry
general
0English
110.1159/000370064
2Neurosciences Abstracts
3ProQuest Biological Science Collection
4ProQuest Natural Science Collection
5ProQuest SciTech Collection
6Biological Science Database
7Natural Science Collection
8SciTech Premium Collection
sourceidproquest
recordidproquest1776662461
issn
003785866
10378-5866
214219859
31421-9859
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2015
addtitleDevelopmental Neuroscience
searchscope
01007536
11007944
210000004
310000038
410000050
510000120
610000198
710000209
810000217
910000238
1010000253
1110000260
12proquest
scope
01007536
11007944
210000004
310000038
410000050
510000120
610000198
710000209
810000217
910000238
1010000253
1110000260
12proquest
lsr43
01007536false
11007944false
210000004false
310000038false
410000050false
510000120false
610000198false
710000209false
810000217false
910000238false
1010000253false
1110000260false
contributorHashimoto, Teruo
startdate20150401
enddate20150401
citationpf 153 pt 160 vol 37 issue 2
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid]
sort
titleIncreased Posterior Hippocampal Volumes in Children with Lower Increase in Body Mass Index: A 3-Year Longitudinal MRI Study
authorHashimoto, Teruo ; Takeuchi, Hikaru ; Taki, Yasuyuki ; Yokota, Susumu ; Hashizume, Hiroshi ; Asano, Kohei ; Asano, Michiko ; Sassa, Yuko ; Nouchi, Rui ; Kawashima, Ryuta
creationdate20150401
lso0120150401
facets
frbrgroupid5088962371492651203
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2015
topic
0Temporal Lobe
1Age
2Hippocampus
3Adolescence
4Magnetic Resonance Imaging
5Brain
6Development
7Children
8Nervous System
9Morphometry
10Body Size
11Parahippocampal Gyrus
12Body Mass Index
13Developmental Neuroscience
14Voxel-Based Morphometry
collection
0Neurosciences Abstracts
1ProQuest Biological Science Collection
2ProQuest Natural Science Collection
3ProQuest SciTech Collection
4Biological Science Database
5Natural Science Collection
6SciTech Premium Collection
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Hashimoto, Teruo
1Takeuchi, Hikaru
2Taki, Yasuyuki
3Yokota, Susumu
4Hashizume, Hiroshi
5Asano, Kohei
6Asano, Michiko
7Sassa, Yuko
8Nouchi, Rui
9Kawashima, Ryuta
jtitleDevelopmental Neuroscience
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Hashimoto
1Takeuchi
2Taki
3Yokota
4Hashizume
5Asano
6Sassa
7Nouchi
8Kawashima
aufirst
0Teruo
1Hikaru
2Yasuyuki
3Susumu
4Hiroshi
5Kohei
6Michiko
7Yuko
8Rui
9Ryuta
au
0Hashimoto, Teruo
1Takeuchi, Hikaru
2Taki, Yasuyuki
3Yokota, Susumu
4Hashizume, Hiroshi
5Asano, Kohei
6Asano, Michiko
7Sassa, Yuko
8Nouchi, Rui
9Kawashima, Ryuta
addauHashimoto, Teruo
atitleIncreased Posterior Hippocampal Volumes in Children with Lower Increase in Body Mass Index: A 3-Year Longitudinal MRI Study
jtitleDevelopmental Neuroscience
risdate20150401
volume37
issue2
spage153
epage160
pages153-160
issn0378-5866
eissn1421-9859
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractPeople are generally lean during childhood and show more variability in body sizes and shapes later in life. Cortical development generally correlates with body growth. However, in children cortical growth may be impaired with oversized body growth. Inverse correlations between body mass index (BMI) and brain volumes suggest that lean bodies may be associated with increased cortical volume. To clarify the positive effects of a lean body on a child's cortical development, we used MRI to measure brain structures longitudinally in 107 children and adolescents aged 5-16 years. The relationships between changes in BMI and cortical volumes during 3 years of development were investigated, while controlling for age, gender and intracranial volume changes. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that an increase in the volume of the right posterior medial temporal lobe - including the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus - was associated with lower BMI increases. No correlations were observed between higher BMI increases and cortical volumes. Our results suggest that keeping a lean body - or not getting fat - during childhood can induce an increase in regional cortical volume rather than impair growth. This is the first longitudinal study showing positive effects of a lean body on cortical development in children. copyright 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel
doi10.1159/000370064
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1776662461/
date2015-04-01