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Return to the Streets

In recent years, several Indonesian cities have relocated street vendors through engagement and participation and with limited confrontation, in turn reducing the volume of itinerant vendors, carving out better work and business environments, and improving public spaces. Despite such celebrated succ... Full description

Journal Title: Cityscape 2016, Vol.18(1), pp.71-88
Main Author: Taylor, John
Other Authors: Song, Lily
Format: Newspaper electronic Article Newspaper electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1936007X ; E-ISSN: 19391935
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1788317775/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest1788317775
title: Return to the Streets
format: Newspaper Article
creator:
  • Taylor, John
  • Song, Lily
subjects:
  • Indonesia
  • Low Income Groups
  • Informal Economy
  • Site Planning
  • Vendors
  • Cities
  • Data Collection
  • Patronage
  • Public Spaces
  • Empowerment
  • Retailing Industry
  • Social Policy
  • Asia & the Pacific
ispartof: Cityscape, 2016, Vol.18(1), pp.71-88
description: In recent years, several Indonesian cities have relocated street vendors through engagement and participation and with limited confrontation, in turn reducing the volume of itinerant vendors, carving out better work and business environments, and improving public spaces. Despite such celebrated successes, however, many vendors have returned to the streets over time for reasons that remain little examined and understood. Undertaking a comparative case study of three Indonesian cities hailed for recent street vendor relocation policies, this article investigates the potential factors and conditions underlying the return of informal vendors after "successful" relocation and upgrading policies and distills lessons for policy and planning improvements. It finds that vendors return to the streets because relocation efforts fail to look beyond aesthetic improvements, relocation processes fail to prepare vendors for the competitiveness of the free market, and longer-term relocation planning and management fail to consider the emerging needs of vendors. In turn, the discussion of policy and planning implications focuses on mechanisms for enhancing the sustainability of relocation programs and on economic empowerment of the urban poor and their rights to urban space, accessibility, and mobility.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1936007X ; E-ISSN: 19391935
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1936007X
  • 1936-007X
  • 19391935
  • 1939-1935
url: Link


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subjectIndonesia ; Low Income Groups ; Informal Economy ; Site Planning ; Vendors ; Cities ; Data Collection ; Patronage ; Public Spaces ; Empowerment ; Retailing Industry ; Social Policy ; Asia & the Pacific
descriptionIn recent years, several Indonesian cities have relocated street vendors through engagement and participation and with limited confrontation, in turn reducing the volume of itinerant vendors, carving out better work and business environments, and improving public spaces. Despite such celebrated successes, however, many vendors have returned to the streets over time for reasons that remain little examined and understood. Undertaking a comparative case study of three Indonesian cities hailed for recent street vendor relocation policies, this article investigates the potential factors and conditions underlying the return of informal vendors after "successful" relocation and upgrading policies and distills lessons for policy and planning improvements. It finds that vendors return to the streets because relocation efforts fail to look beyond aesthetic improvements, relocation processes fail to prepare vendors for the competitiveness of the free market, and longer-term relocation planning and management fail to consider the emerging needs of vendors. In turn, the discussion of policy and planning implications focuses on mechanisms for enhancing the sustainability of relocation programs and on economic empowerment of the urban poor and their rights to urban space, accessibility, and mobility.
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abstractIn recent years, several Indonesian cities have relocated street vendors through engagement and participation and with limited confrontation, in turn reducing the volume of itinerant vendors, carving out better work and business environments, and improving public spaces. Despite such celebrated successes, however, many vendors have returned to the streets over time for reasons that remain little examined and understood. Undertaking a comparative case study of three Indonesian cities hailed for recent street vendor relocation policies, this article investigates the potential factors and conditions underlying the return of informal vendors after "successful" relocation and upgrading policies and distills lessons for policy and planning improvements. It finds that vendors return to the streets because relocation efforts fail to look beyond aesthetic improvements, relocation processes fail to prepare vendors for the competitiveness of the free market, and longer-term relocation planning and management fail to consider the emerging needs of vendors. In turn, the discussion of policy and planning implications focuses on mechanisms for enhancing the sustainability of relocation programs and on economic empowerment of the urban poor and their rights to urban space, accessibility, and mobility.
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