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Determinants and Consequences of Obesity.

OBJECTIVESTo review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS and NHS II) in addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for and consequences of obesity. METHODSNarrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. RESULTSLong-term NHS research has shown that w... Full description

Journal Title: American journal of public health Vol.106(9), pp.1656-1662
Main Author: Hruby, Adela
Other Authors: Manson, Joann E , Qi, Lu , Malik, Vasanti S , Rimm, Eric B , Sun, Qi , Willett, Walter C , Hu, Frank B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Created: September 2016
ID: E-ISSN: 1541-0048 ; DOI: 1541-0048 ; DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2016.303326
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1811292686/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Determinants and Consequences of Obesity.
format: Article
creator:
  • Hruby, Adela
  • Manson, Joann E
  • Qi, Lu
  • Malik, Vasanti S
  • Rimm, Eric B
  • Sun, Qi
  • Willett, Walter C
  • Hu, Frank B
subjects:
  • Adult–Epidemiology
  • Cardiovascular Diseases–Etiology
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2–Epidemiology
  • Diet–Etiology
  • Epidemiologic Studies–Epidemiology
  • Female–Etiology
  • Humans–Complications
  • Life Style–Epidemiology
  • Longitudinal Studies–Epidemiology
  • Middle Aged–Epidemiology
  • Mortality, Premature–Epidemiology
  • Neoplasms–Epidemiology
  • Nurses–Epidemiology
  • Obesity–Epidemiology
  • Prospective Studies–Epidemiology
  • Risk Factors–Epidemiology
  • Sedentary Lifestyle–Epidemiology
  • United States–Epidemiology
  • Women'S Health–Epidemiology
  • Abridged
ispartof: American journal of public health, Vol.106(9), pp.1656-1662
description: OBJECTIVESTo review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS and NHS II) in addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for and consequences of obesity. METHODSNarrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. RESULTSLong-term NHS research has shown that weight gain and being overweight or obese are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancers, and premature death. The cohorts have elucidated the role of dietary and lifestyle factors in obesity, especially sugar-sweetened beverages, poor diet quality, physical inactivity, prolonged screen time, short sleep duration or shift work, and built environment characteristics. Genome-wide association and gene-lifestyle interaction studies have shown that genetic factors predispose individuals to obesity but that such susceptibility can be attenuated by healthy lifestyle choices. This research has contributed to evolving clinical and public health guidelines on the importance of limiting weight gain through healthy dietary and lifestyle behaviors. CONCLUSIONSThe NHS cohorts have contributed to our understanding of the risk factors for and consequences of obesity and made a lasting impact on clinical and public health guidelines on obesity prevention.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1541-0048 ; DOI: 1541-0048 ; DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2016.303326
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 15410048
  • 1541-0048
url: Link


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subjectAdult–Epidemiology ; Cardiovascular Diseases–Etiology ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2–Epidemiology ; Diet–Etiology ; Epidemiologic Studies–Epidemiology ; Female–Etiology ; Humans–Complications ; Life Style–Epidemiology ; Longitudinal Studies–Epidemiology ; Middle Aged–Epidemiology ; Mortality, Premature–Epidemiology ; Neoplasms–Epidemiology ; Nurses–Epidemiology ; Obesity–Epidemiology ; Prospective Studies–Epidemiology ; Risk Factors–Epidemiology ; Sedentary Lifestyle–Epidemiology ; United States–Epidemiology ; Women'S Health–Epidemiology ; Abridged
descriptionOBJECTIVESTo review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS and NHS II) in addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for and consequences of obesity. METHODSNarrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. RESULTSLong-term NHS research has shown that weight gain and being overweight or obese are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancers, and premature death. The cohorts have elucidated the role of dietary and lifestyle factors in obesity, especially sugar-sweetened beverages, poor diet quality, physical inactivity, prolonged screen time, short sleep duration or shift work, and built environment characteristics. Genome-wide association and gene-lifestyle interaction studies have shown that genetic factors predispose individuals to obesity but that such susceptibility can be attenuated by healthy lifestyle choices. This research has contributed to evolving clinical and public health guidelines on the importance of limiting weight gain through healthy dietary and lifestyle behaviors. CONCLUSIONSThe NHS cohorts have contributed to our understanding of the risk factors for and consequences of obesity and made a lasting impact on clinical and public health guidelines on obesity prevention.
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titleDeterminants and Consequences of Obesity.
descriptionOBJECTIVESTo review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS and NHS II) in addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for and consequences of obesity. METHODSNarrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. RESULTSLong-term NHS research has shown that weight gain and being overweight or obese are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancers, and premature death. The cohorts have elucidated the role of dietary and lifestyle factors in obesity, especially sugar-sweetened beverages, poor diet quality, physical inactivity, prolonged screen time, short sleep duration or shift work, and built environment characteristics. Genome-wide association and gene-lifestyle interaction studies have shown that genetic factors predispose individuals to obesity but that such susceptibility can be attenuated by healthy lifestyle choices. This research has contributed to evolving clinical and public health guidelines on the importance of limiting weight gain through healthy dietary and lifestyle behaviors. CONCLUSIONSThe NHS cohorts have contributed to our understanding of the risk factors for and consequences of obesity and made a lasting impact on clinical and public health guidelines on obesity prevention.
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abstractOBJECTIVESTo review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS and NHS II) in addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for and consequences of obesity. METHODSNarrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. RESULTSLong-term NHS research has shown that weight gain and being overweight or obese are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancers, and premature death. The cohorts have elucidated the role of dietary and lifestyle factors in obesity, especially sugar-sweetened beverages, poor diet quality, physical inactivity, prolonged screen time, short sleep duration or shift work, and built environment characteristics. Genome-wide association and gene-lifestyle interaction studies have shown that genetic factors predispose individuals to obesity but that such susceptibility can be attenuated by healthy lifestyle choices. This research has contributed to evolving clinical and public health guidelines on the importance of limiting weight gain through healthy dietary and lifestyle behaviors. CONCLUSIONSThe NHS cohorts have contributed to our understanding of the risk factors for and consequences of obesity and made a lasting impact on clinical and public health guidelines on obesity prevention.
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