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Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of incident depression in midlife and older women.

BACKGROUNDThe impact of dietary flavonoid intakes on risk of depression is unclear. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined associations between estimated habitual intakes of dietary flavonoids and depression risk. DESIGNWe followed 82,643 women without a previous history of depression at baseline from t... Full description

Journal Title: The American journal of clinical nutrition September 2016, Vol.104(3), pp.704-714
Main Author: Chang, Shun-Chiao
Other Authors: Cassidy, Aedin , Willett, Walter C , Rimm, Eric B , O'Reilly, Eilis J , Okereke, Olivia I
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.115.124545
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1816631646/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of incident depression in midlife and older women.
format: Article
creator:
  • Chang, Shun-Chiao
  • Cassidy, Aedin
  • Willett, Walter C
  • Rimm, Eric B
  • O'Reilly, Eilis J
  • Okereke, Olivia I
subjects:
  • Adult–Therapeutic Use
  • Aged–Drug Therapy
  • Aged, 80 and Over–Epidemiology
  • Aging–Prevention & Control
  • Antidepressive Agents–Administration & Dosage
  • Cohort Studies–Therapeutic Use
  • Depression–Epidemiology
  • Female–Epidemiology
  • Flavonoids–Epidemiology
  • Follow-Up Studies–Epidemiology
  • Healthy Diet–Epidemiology
  • Humans–Epidemiology
  • Incidence–Epidemiology
  • Middle Aged–Epidemiology
  • Nurses–Epidemiology
  • Patient Compliance–Epidemiology
  • Proportional Hazards Models–Epidemiology
  • Prospective Studies–Epidemiology
  • Psychiatric Status Rating Scales–Epidemiology
  • Risk Factors–Epidemiology
  • Self Report–Epidemiology
  • United States–Epidemiology
  • Abridged
  • Antidepressive Agents
  • Flavonoids
  • Nurses’ Health Study
  • Depression
  • Epidemiology
  • Flavonoids
  • Geriatrics
  • Prospective Cohort
ispartof: The American journal of clinical nutrition, September 2016, Vol.104(3), pp.704-714
description: BACKGROUNDThe impact of dietary flavonoid intakes on risk of depression is unclear. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined associations between estimated habitual intakes of dietary flavonoids and depression risk. DESIGNWe followed 82,643 women without a previous history of depression at baseline from the Nurses' Health Study [(NHS) aged 53-80 y] and the Nurses' Health Study II [(NHSII) aged 36-55 y]. Intakes of total flavonoids and subclasses (flavonols, flavones, flavanones, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, polymeric flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins) were calculated from validated food-frequency questionnaires collected every 2-4 y. Depression was defined as physician- or clinician-diagnosed depression or antidepressant use and was self-reported in response to periodic questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to examine associations. RESULTSA total of 10,752 incident depression cases occurred during a 10-y follow-up. Inverse associations between flavonol, flavone, and flavanone intakes and depression risk were observed. Pooled multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.93 (0.88, 0.99), 0.92 (0.86, 0.98), and 0.90 (0.85, 0.96) when comparing the highest (quintile 5) with the lowest (quintile 1) quintiles, respectively, with evidence of linear trends across quintiles (P-trend = 0.0004-0.08). In flavonoid-rich food-based analyses, the HR was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.91) among participants who consumed ≥2 servings citrus fruit or juices/d compared with
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.115.124545
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19383207
  • 1938-3207
url: Link


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titleDietary flavonoid intake and risk of incident depression in midlife and older women.
creatorChang, Shun-Chiao ; Cassidy, Aedin ; Willett, Walter C ; Rimm, Eric B ; O'Reilly, Eilis J ; Okereke, Olivia I
contributorChang, Shun-Chiao (correspondence author) ; Chang, Shun-Chiao (record owner)
ispartofThe American journal of clinical nutrition, September 2016, Vol.104(3), pp.704-714
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subjectAdult–Therapeutic Use ; Aged–Drug Therapy ; Aged, 80 and Over–Epidemiology ; Aging–Prevention & Control ; Antidepressive Agents–Administration & Dosage ; Cohort Studies–Therapeutic Use ; Depression–Epidemiology ; Female–Epidemiology ; Flavonoids–Epidemiology ; Follow-Up Studies–Epidemiology ; Healthy Diet–Epidemiology ; Humans–Epidemiology ; Incidence–Epidemiology ; Middle Aged–Epidemiology ; Nurses–Epidemiology ; Patient Compliance–Epidemiology ; Proportional Hazards Models–Epidemiology ; Prospective Studies–Epidemiology ; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales–Epidemiology ; Risk Factors–Epidemiology ; Self Report–Epidemiology ; United States–Epidemiology ; Abridged ; Antidepressive Agents ; Flavonoids ; Nurses’ Health Study ; Depression ; Epidemiology ; Flavonoids ; Geriatrics ; Prospective Cohort
descriptionBACKGROUNDThe impact of dietary flavonoid intakes on risk of depression is unclear. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined associations between estimated habitual intakes of dietary flavonoids and depression risk. DESIGNWe followed 82,643 women without a previous history of depression at baseline from the Nurses' Health Study [(NHS) aged 53-80 y] and the Nurses' Health Study II [(NHSII) aged 36-55 y]. Intakes of total flavonoids and subclasses (flavonols, flavones, flavanones, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, polymeric flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins) were calculated from validated food-frequency questionnaires collected every 2-4 y. Depression was defined as physician- or clinician-diagnosed depression or antidepressant use and was self-reported in response to periodic questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to examine associations. RESULTSA total of 10,752 incident depression cases occurred during a 10-y follow-up. Inverse associations between flavonol, flavone, and flavanone intakes and depression risk were observed. Pooled multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.93 (0.88, 0.99), 0.92 (0.86, 0.98), and 0.90 (0.85, 0.96) when comparing the highest (quintile 5) with the lowest (quintile 1) quintiles, respectively, with evidence of linear trends across quintiles (P-trend = 0.0004-0.08). In flavonoid-rich food-based analyses, the HR was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.91) among participants who consumed ≥2 servings citrus fruit or juices/d compared with <1 serving/wk. In the NHS only, total flavonoids, polymers, and proanthocyanidin intakes showed significantly (9-12%) lower depression risks. In analyses among late-life NHS participants (aged ≥65 y at baseline or during follow-up), for whom we were able to incorporate depressive symptoms into the outcome definition, higher intakes of all flavonoid subclasses except for flavan-3-ols were associated with significantly lower depression risk; flavones and proanthocyanidins showed the strongest associations (HR for both: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.90). CONCLUSIONSHigher flavonoid intakes may be associated with lower depression risk, particularly among older women. Further studies are needed to confirm these associations.
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titleDietary flavonoid intake and risk of incident depression in midlife and older women.
descriptionBACKGROUNDThe impact of dietary flavonoid intakes on risk of depression is unclear. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined associations between estimated habitual intakes of dietary flavonoids and depression risk. DESIGNWe followed 82,643 women without a previous history of depression at baseline from the Nurses' Health Study [(NHS) aged 53-80 y] and the Nurses' Health Study II [(NHSII) aged 36-55 y]. Intakes of total flavonoids and subclasses (flavonols, flavones, flavanones, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, polymeric flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins) were calculated from validated food-frequency questionnaires collected every 2-4 y. Depression was defined as physician- or clinician-diagnosed depression or antidepressant use and was self-reported in response to periodic questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to examine associations. RESULTSA total of 10,752 incident depression cases occurred during a 10-y follow-up. Inverse associations between flavonol, flavone, and flavanone intakes and depression risk were observed. Pooled multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.93 (0.88, 0.99), 0.92 (0.86, 0.98), and 0.90 (0.85, 0.96) when comparing the highest (quintile 5) with the lowest (quintile 1) quintiles, respectively, with evidence of linear trends across quintiles (P-trend = 0.0004-0.08). In flavonoid-rich food-based analyses, the HR was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.91) among participants who consumed ≥2 servings citrus fruit or juices/d compared with <1 serving/wk. In the NHS only, total flavonoids, polymers, and proanthocyanidin intakes showed significantly (9-12%) lower depression risks. In analyses among late-life NHS participants (aged ≥65 y at baseline or during follow-up), for whom we were able to incorporate depressive symptoms into the outcome definition, higher intakes of all flavonoid subclasses except for flavan-3-ols were associated with significantly lower depression risk; flavones and proanthocyanidins showed the strongest associations (HR for both: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.90). CONCLUSIONSHigher flavonoid intakes may be associated with lower depression risk, particularly among older women. Further studies are needed to confirm these associations.
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16Proportional Hazards Models–Epidemiology
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titleDietary flavonoid intake and risk of incident depression in midlife and older women.
authorChang, Shun-Chiao ; Cassidy, Aedin ; Willett, Walter C ; Rimm, Eric B ; O'Reilly, Eilis J ; Okereke, Olivia I
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abstractBACKGROUNDThe impact of dietary flavonoid intakes on risk of depression is unclear. OBJECTIVEWe prospectively examined associations between estimated habitual intakes of dietary flavonoids and depression risk. DESIGNWe followed 82,643 women without a previous history of depression at baseline from the Nurses' Health Study [(NHS) aged 53-80 y] and the Nurses' Health Study II [(NHSII) aged 36-55 y]. Intakes of total flavonoids and subclasses (flavonols, flavones, flavanones, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, polymeric flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins) were calculated from validated food-frequency questionnaires collected every 2-4 y. Depression was defined as physician- or clinician-diagnosed depression or antidepressant use and was self-reported in response to periodic questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to examine associations. RESULTSA total of 10,752 incident depression cases occurred during a 10-y follow-up. Inverse associations between flavonol, flavone, and flavanone intakes and depression risk were observed. Pooled multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.93 (0.88, 0.99), 0.92 (0.86, 0.98), and 0.90 (0.85, 0.96) when comparing the highest (quintile 5) with the lowest (quintile 1) quintiles, respectively, with evidence of linear trends across quintiles (P-trend = 0.0004-0.08). In flavonoid-rich food-based analyses, the HR was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.91) among participants who consumed ≥2 servings citrus fruit or juices/d compared with <1 serving/wk. In the NHS only, total flavonoids, polymers, and proanthocyanidin intakes showed significantly (9-12%) lower depression risks. In analyses among late-life NHS participants (aged ≥65 y at baseline or during follow-up), for whom we were able to incorporate depressive symptoms into the outcome definition, higher intakes of all flavonoid subclasses except for flavan-3-ols were associated with significantly lower depression risk; flavones and proanthocyanidins showed the strongest associations (HR for both: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.90). CONCLUSIONSHigher flavonoid intakes may be associated with lower depression risk, particularly among older women. Further studies are needed to confirm these associations.
doi10.3945/ajcn.115.124545
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1816631646/
issn00029165
date2016-09-01