schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Health Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology: description and application to clinical feedback systems

Background Health information technologies (HIT) have become nearly ubiquitous in the contemporary healthcare landscape, but information about HIT development, functionality, and implementation readiness is frequently siloed. Theory-driven methods of compiling, evaluating, and integrating informatio... Full description

Journal Title: Implementation Science 2016, Vol.11
Main Author: Lyon, Aaron
Other Authors: Lewis, Cara , Melvin, Abigail , Boyd, Meredith , Liu, Freda , Jungbluth, Nathaniel , Lyon, Aaron , Lewis, Cara , Melvin, Abigail , Boyd, Meredith , Liu, Freda , Jungbluth, Nathaniel
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: DOI: 10.1186/s13012-016-0495-2
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: proquest1825741333
title: Health Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology: description and application to clinical feedback systems
format: Article
creator:
  • Lyon, Aaron
  • Lewis, Cara
  • Melvin, Abigail
  • Boyd, Meredith
  • Liu, Freda
  • Jungbluth, Nathaniel
  • Lyon, Aaron
  • Lewis, Cara
  • Melvin, Abigail
  • Boyd, Meredith
  • Liu, Freda
  • Jungbluth, Nathaniel
subjects:
  • Health Information Technology
  • Measurement Feedback Systems
  • Behavioral Health
  • Mental Health
  • Competitive Analysis
  • Routine Outcome Monitoring
ispartof: Implementation Science, 2016, Vol.11
description: Background Health information technologies (HIT) have become nearly ubiquitous in the contemporary healthcare landscape, but information about HIT development, functionality, and implementation readiness is frequently siloed. Theory-driven methods of compiling, evaluating, and integrating information from the academic and commercial sectors are necessary to guide stakeholder decision-making surrounding HIT adoption and to develop pragmatic HIT research agendas. This article presents the Health Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology, a structured, theory-driven method for compiling and evaluating information from multiple sectors. As an example demonstration of the methodology, we apply HIT-ACE to mental and behavioral health measurement feedback systems (MFS). MFS are a specific class of HIT that support the implementation of routine outcome monitoring, an evidence-based practice. Results HIT-ACE is guided by theories and frameworks related to user-centered design and implementation science. The methodology involves four phases: (1) coding academic and commercial materials, (2) developer/purveyor interviews, (3) linking putative implementation mechanisms to hit capabilities, and (4) experimental testing of capabilities and mechanisms. In the current demonstration, phase 1 included a systematic process to identify MFS in mental and behavioral health using academic literature and commercial websites. Using user-centered design, implementation science, and feedback frameworks, the HIT-ACE coding system was developed, piloted, and used to review each identified system for the presence of 38 capabilities and 18 additional characteristics via a consensus coding process. Bibliometic data were also collected to examine the representation of the systems in the scientific literature. As an example, results are presented for the application of HIT-ACE phase 1 to MFS wherein 49 separate MFS were identified, reflecting a diverse array of characteristics and capabilities. Conclusions Preliminary findings demonstrate the utility of HIT-ACE to represent the scope and diversity of a given class of HIT beyond what can be identified in the academic literature. Phase 2 data collection is expected to confirm and expand the information presented and phases 3 and 4 will provide more nuanced information about the impact of specific HIT capabilities. In all, HIT-ACE is expected to support adoption decisions and additional HIT development
language: eng
source:
identifier: DOI: 10.1186/s13012-016-0495-2
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
url: Link


@attributes
ID185644526
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid1825741333
sourceidproquest
recordidTN_proquest1825741333
sourcesystemOther
pqid1825741333
galeid470589631
display
typearticle
titleHealth Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology: description and application to clinical feedback systems
creatorLyon, Aaron ; Lewis, Cara ; Melvin, Abigail ; Boyd, Meredith ; Liu, Freda ; Jungbluth, Nathaniel ; Lyon, Aaron ; Lewis, Cara ; Melvin, Abigail ; Boyd, Meredith ; Liu, Freda ; Jungbluth, Nathaniel
ispartofImplementation Science, 2016, Vol.11
identifierDOI: 10.1186/s13012-016-0495-2
subjectHealth Information Technology ; Measurement Feedback Systems ; Behavioral Health ; Mental Health ; Competitive Analysis ; Routine Outcome Monitoring
descriptionBackground Health information technologies (HIT) have become nearly ubiquitous in the contemporary healthcare landscape, but information about HIT development, functionality, and implementation readiness is frequently siloed. Theory-driven methods of compiling, evaluating, and integrating information from the academic and commercial sectors are necessary to guide stakeholder decision-making surrounding HIT adoption and to develop pragmatic HIT research agendas. This article presents the Health Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology, a structured, theory-driven method for compiling and evaluating information from multiple sectors. As an example demonstration of the methodology, we apply HIT-ACE to mental and behavioral health measurement feedback systems (MFS). MFS are a specific class of HIT that support the implementation of routine outcome monitoring, an evidence-based practice. Results HIT-ACE is guided by theories and frameworks related to user-centered design and implementation science. The methodology involves four phases: (1) coding academic and commercial materials, (2) developer/purveyor interviews, (3) linking putative implementation mechanisms to hit capabilities, and (4) experimental testing of capabilities and mechanisms. In the current demonstration, phase 1 included a systematic process to identify MFS in mental and behavioral health using academic literature and commercial websites. Using user-centered design, implementation science, and feedback frameworks, the HIT-ACE coding system was developed, piloted, and used to review each identified system for the presence of 38 capabilities and 18 additional characteristics via a consensus coding process. Bibliometic data were also collected to examine the representation of the systems in the scientific literature. As an example, results are presented for the application of HIT-ACE phase 1 to MFS wherein 49 separate MFS were identified, reflecting a diverse array of characteristics and capabilities. Conclusions Preliminary findings demonstrate the utility of HIT-ACE to represent the scope and diversity of a given class of HIT beyond what can be identified in the academic literature. Phase 2 data collection is expected to confirm and expand the information presented and phases 3 and 4 will provide more nuanced information about the impact of specific HIT capabilities. In all, HIT-ACE is expected to support adoption decisions and additional HIT development and implementation research.
languageeng
source
version7
oafree_for_read
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
linktorsrc$$Uhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1825741333/?pq-origsite=primo$$EView_record_in_ProQuest_(subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontrib
0Lyon, Aaron
1Lewis, Cara
2Melvin, Abigail
3Boyd, Meredith
4Liu, Freda
5Jungbluth, Nathaniel
titleHealth Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology: description and application to clinical feedback systems
descriptionBackground Health information technologies (HIT) have become nearly ubiquitous in the contemporary healthcare landscape, but information about HIT development, functionality, and implementation readiness is frequently siloed. Theory-driven methods of compiling, evaluating, and integrating information from the academic and commercial sectors are necessary to guide stakeholder decision-making surrounding HIT adoption and to develop pragmatic HIT research agendas. This article presents the Health Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology, a structured, theory-driven method for compiling and evaluating information from multiple sectors. As an example demonstration of the methodology, we apply HIT-ACE to mental and behavioral health measurement feedback systems (MFS). MFS are a specific class of HIT that support the implementation of routine outcome monitoring, an evidence-based practice. Results HIT-ACE is guided by theories and frameworks related to user-centered design and implementation science. The methodology involves four phases: (1) coding academic and commercial materials, (2) developer/purveyor interviews, (3) linking putative implementation mechanisms to hit capabilities, and (4) experimental testing of capabilities and mechanisms. In the current demonstration, phase 1 included a systematic process to identify MFS in mental and behavioral health using academic literature and commercial websites. Using user-centered design, implementation science, and feedback frameworks, the HIT-ACE coding system was developed, piloted, and used to review each identified system for the presence of 38 capabilities and 18 additional characteristics via a consensus coding process. Bibliometic data were also collected to examine the representation of the systems in the scientific literature. As an example, results are presented for the application of HIT-ACE phase 1 to MFS wherein 49 separate MFS were identified, reflecting a diverse array of characteristics and capabilities. Conclusions Preliminary findings demonstrate the utility of HIT-ACE to represent the scope and diversity of a given class of HIT beyond what can be identified in the academic literature. Phase 2 data collection is expected to confirm and expand the information presented and phases 3 and 4 will provide more nuanced information about the impact of specific HIT capabilities. In all, HIT-ACE is expected to support adoption decisions and additional HIT development and implementation research.
subject
0Health Information Technology
1Measurement Feedback Systems
2Behavioral Health
3Mental Health
4Competitive Analysis
5Routine Outcome Monitoring
6Health information technology
7Measurement feedback systems
8Behavioral health
9Mental health
10Competitive analysis
11Routine outcome monitoring
general
0English
1BioMed Central
210.1186/s13012-016-0495-2
3Medical Database
4Health & Medical Collection (Alumni edition)
5Medical Database (Alumni edition)
6Health & Medical Collection
7Publicly Available Content Database
8ProQuest Central
9ProQuest Hospital Collection
10Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
11ProQuest Health & Medical Complete
12ProQuest Medical Library
13ProQuest Central (new)
14ProQuest Central Korea
15Health Research Premium Collection
16Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
17ProQuest Central Essentials
18ProQuest Central China
sourceidproquest
recordidproquest1825741333
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2016
addtitleImplementation Science
searchscope
01000273
11006761
21006762
31007067
41007945
51008886
61009127
71009240
81009386
910000039
1010000047
1110000118
1210000119
1310000155
1410000156
1510000157
1610000158
1710000255
1810000256
1910000258
2010000270
2110000271
2210000281
2310000300
2410000302
25proquest
scope
01000273
11006761
21006762
31007067
41007945
51008886
61009127
71009240
81009386
910000039
1010000047
1110000118
1210000119
1310000155
1410000156
1510000157
1610000158
1710000255
1810000256
1910000258
2010000270
2110000271
2210000281
2310000300
2410000302
25proquest
lsr43
01000273true
11006761true
21006762true
31007067true
41007945true
51008886true
61009127true
71009240true
81009386true
910000039true
1010000047true
1110000118true
1210000119true
1310000155true
1410000156true
1510000157true
1610000158true
1710000255true
1810000256true
1910000258true
2010000270true
2110000271true
2210000281true
2310000300true
2410000302true
startdate20160101
enddate20160101
citationvol 11
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pages, pqid, issn, eissn, issue, galeid]
sort
titleHealth Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology: description and application to clinical feedback systems
authorLyon, Aaron ; Lewis, Cara ; Melvin, Abigail ; Boyd, Meredith ; Liu, Freda ; Jungbluth, Nathaniel ; Lyon, Aaron ; Lewis, Cara ; Melvin, Abigail ; Boyd, Meredith ; Liu, Freda ; Jungbluth, Nathaniel
creationdate20160101
lso0120160101
facets
frbrgroupid-3945463963243629803
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2016
topic
0Health Information Technology
1Measurement Feedback Systems
2Behavioral Health
3Mental Health
4Competitive Analysis
5Routine Outcome Monitoring
collection
0Medical Database
1Health & Medical Collection (Alumni edition)
2Medical Database (Alumni edition)
3Health & Medical Collection
4Publicly Available Content Database
5ProQuest Central
6ProQuest Hospital Collection
7Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
8ProQuest Health & Medical Complete
9ProQuest Medical Library
10ProQuest Central (new)
11ProQuest Central Korea
12Health Research Premium Collection
13Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
14ProQuest Central Essentials
15ProQuest Central China
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Lyon, Aaron
1Lewis, Cara
2Melvin, Abigail
3Boyd, Meredith
4Liu, Freda
5Jungbluth, Nathaniel
jtitleImplementation Science
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext_linktorsrc
addata
aulast
0Lyon
1Lewis
2Melvin
3Boyd
4Liu
5Jungbluth
aufirst
0Aaron
1Cara
2Abigail
3Meredith
4Freda
5Nathaniel
au
0Lyon, Aaron
1Lewis, Cara
2Melvin, Abigail
3Boyd, Meredith
4Liu, Freda
5Jungbluth, Nathaniel
atitleHealth Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology: description and application to clinical feedback systems
jtitleImplementation Science
risdate20160101
volume11
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractBackground Health information technologies (HIT) have become nearly ubiquitous in the contemporary healthcare landscape, but information about HIT development, functionality, and implementation readiness is frequently siloed. Theory-driven methods of compiling, evaluating, and integrating information from the academic and commercial sectors are necessary to guide stakeholder decision-making surrounding HIT adoption and to develop pragmatic HIT research agendas. This article presents the Health Information Technologies-Academic and Commercial Evaluation (HIT-ACE) methodology, a structured, theory-driven method for compiling and evaluating information from multiple sectors. As an example demonstration of the methodology, we apply HIT-ACE to mental and behavioral health measurement feedback systems (MFS). MFS are a specific class of HIT that support the implementation of routine outcome monitoring, an evidence-based practice. Results HIT-ACE is guided by theories and frameworks related to user-centered design and implementation science. The methodology involves four phases: (1) coding academic and commercial materials, (2) developer/purveyor interviews, (3) linking putative implementation mechanisms to hit capabilities, and (4) experimental testing of capabilities and mechanisms. In the current demonstration, phase 1 included a systematic process to identify MFS in mental and behavioral health using academic literature and commercial websites. Using user-centered design, implementation science, and feedback frameworks, the HIT-ACE coding system was developed, piloted, and used to review each identified system for the presence of 38 capabilities and 18 additional characteristics via a consensus coding process. Bibliometic data were also collected to examine the representation of the systems in the scientific literature. As an example, results are presented for the application of HIT-ACE phase 1 to MFS wherein 49 separate MFS were identified, reflecting a diverse array of characteristics and capabilities. Conclusions Preliminary findings demonstrate the utility of HIT-ACE to represent the scope and diversity of a given class of HIT beyond what can be identified in the academic literature. Phase 2 data collection is expected to confirm and expand the information presented and phases 3 and 4 will provide more nuanced information about the impact of specific HIT capabilities. In all, HIT-ACE is expected to support adoption decisions and additional HIT development and implementation research.
copLondon
pubBioMed Central
doi10.1186/s13012-016-0495-2
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1825741333/
pages128
issue1
issn17485908
eissn17485908
oafree_for_read
date2016-01-01