schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Characterisation of LMD virus-like nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic liposomes, adenovirus core peptide mu (mu) and plasmid DNA

Liposome:mu:DNA (LMD) is a ternary nucleic acid delivery system built around the mu (mu) peptide associated with the condensed core complex of the adenovirus. LMD is prepared by precondensing plasmid DNA (D) with mu peptide (M) in a 1:0.6 (w/w) ratio and then combining these mu:DNA (MD) complexes wi... Full description

Journal Title: Gene Therapy May 2002, Vol.9(9), pp.564-576
Main Author: Tagawa, T
Other Authors: Manvell, M , Brown, N , Keller, M , Perouzel, E , Murray, K , Harbottle, R , Tecle, M , Booy, F , Brahimi-Horn, M , Coutelle, C , Lemoine, N , Alton, Ewfw , Miller, AD
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0969-7128 ; DOI: 10.1038/sj/gt/3301686
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/18388865/?pq-origsite=primo
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: proquest18388865
title: Characterisation of LMD virus-like nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic liposomes, adenovirus core peptide mu (mu) and plasmid DNA
format: Article
creator:
  • Tagawa, T
  • Manvell, M
  • Brown, N
  • Keller, M
  • Perouzel, E
  • Murray, K
  • Harbottle, R
  • Tecle, M
  • Booy, F
  • Brahimi-Horn, M
  • Coutelle, C
  • Lemoine, N
  • Alton, Ewfw
  • Miller, AD
subjects:
  • Transformation
  • Gene Therapy Vectors
  • Miscellaneous, Reviews
  • Genetic Engineering in Medicine
ispartof: Gene Therapy, May 2002, Vol.9(9), pp.564-576
description: Liposome:mu:DNA (LMD) is a ternary nucleic acid delivery system built around the mu (mu) peptide associated with the condensed core complex of the adenovirus. LMD is prepared by precondensing plasmid DNA (D) with mu peptide (M) in a 1:0.6 (w/w) ratio and then combining these mu:DNA (MD) complexes with extruded cationic liposomes (L) resulting in a final lipid:mu:DNA ratio of 12:0.6:1 (w/w/w). Correct buffer conditions, reagent concentrations and rates of mixing are all crucial to success. However, once optimal conditions are established, homogeneous LMD particles (120 plus or minus 30 nm) will result that each appear to comprise an MD particle encapsulated within a cationic bilammellar liposome. LMD particles can be formulated reproducibly, they are amenable to long-term storage (>1 month) at -80 degree C and are stable to aggregation at a plasmid DNA concentration up to 5 mg/ml (15 mM nucleotide concentration). Furthermore, LMD transfections are significantly more time and dose efficient in vitro than cationic liposome-plasmid DNA (LD) transfections. Transfection times as short as 10 min and plasmid DNA doses as low as 0.001 mu g/well result in significant gene expression. LMD transfections will also take place in the presence of biological fluids (eg up to 100% serum) giving 15-25% the level of gene expression observed in the absence of serum. Results from confocal microscopy experiments using fluorescent-labelled LMD particles suggest that endocytosis is not a significant barrier to LMD transfection, although the nuclear membrane still is. We also confirm that topical lung transfection in vivo by LMD is at least equal in absolute terms with transfection mediated by GL-67:DOPE:DMPE-PEG sub(5)000 (1:2:0.05 m/m/m), an accepted `gold-standard' non-viral vector system for topical lung transfection, and is in fact at least six-fold more dose efficient. All these features make LMD an important new non-viral vector platform system from which to derive tailor-made non-viral delivery systems by a process of systematic modular upgrading.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0969-7128 ; DOI: 10.1038/sj/gt/3301686
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 09697128
  • 0969-7128
url: Link


@attributes
ID909265192
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid18388865
sourceidproquest
recordidTN_proquest18388865
sourcesystemOther
pqid18388865
display
typearticle
titleCharacterisation of LMD virus-like nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic liposomes, adenovirus core peptide mu (mu) and plasmid DNA
creatorTagawa, T ; Manvell, M ; Brown, N ; Keller, M ; Perouzel, E ; Murray, K ; Harbottle, R ; Tecle, M ; Booy, F ; Brahimi-Horn, M ; Coutelle, C ; Lemoine, N ; Alton, Ewfw ; Miller, AD
contributorTagawa, T (correspondence author)
ispartofGene Therapy, May 2002, Vol.9(9), pp.564-576
identifierISSN: 0969-7128 ; DOI: 10.1038/sj/gt/3301686
subjectTransformation ; Gene Therapy Vectors ; Miscellaneous, Reviews ; Genetic Engineering in Medicine
descriptionLiposome:mu:DNA (LMD) is a ternary nucleic acid delivery system built around the mu (mu) peptide associated with the condensed core complex of the adenovirus. LMD is prepared by precondensing plasmid DNA (D) with mu peptide (M) in a 1:0.6 (w/w) ratio and then combining these mu:DNA (MD) complexes with extruded cationic liposomes (L) resulting in a final lipid:mu:DNA ratio of 12:0.6:1 (w/w/w). Correct buffer conditions, reagent concentrations and rates of mixing are all crucial to success. However, once optimal conditions are established, homogeneous LMD particles (120 plus or minus 30 nm) will result that each appear to comprise an MD particle encapsulated within a cationic bilammellar liposome. LMD particles can be formulated reproducibly, they are amenable to long-term storage (>1 month) at -80 degree C and are stable to aggregation at a plasmid DNA concentration up to 5 mg/ml (15 mM nucleotide concentration). Furthermore, LMD transfections are significantly more time and dose efficient in vitro than cationic liposome-plasmid DNA (LD) transfections. Transfection times as short as 10 min and plasmid DNA doses as low as 0.001 mu g/well result in significant gene expression. LMD transfections will also take place in the presence of biological fluids (eg up to 100% serum) giving 15-25% the level of gene expression observed in the absence of serum. Results from confocal microscopy experiments using fluorescent-labelled LMD particles suggest that endocytosis is not a significant barrier to LMD transfection, although the nuclear membrane still is. We also confirm that topical lung transfection in vivo by LMD is at least equal in absolute terms with transfection mediated by GL-67:DOPE:DMPE-PEG sub(5)000 (1:2:0.05 m/m/m), an accepted `gold-standard' non-viral vector system for topical lung transfection, and is in fact at least six-fold more dose efficient. All these features make LMD an important new non-viral vector platform system from which to derive tailor-made non-viral delivery systems by a process of systematic modular upgrading.
languageeng
source
version6
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
backlink$$Uhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/18388865/?pq-origsite=primo$$EView_record_in_ProQuest_(subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontrib
0Tagawa, T
1Manvell, M
2Brown, N
3Keller, M
4Perouzel, E
5Murray, K
6Harbottle, R
7Tecle, M
8Booy, F
9Brahimi-Horn, M
10Coutelle, C
11Lemoine, N
12Alton, Ewfw
13Miller, AD
titleCharacterisation of LMD virus-like nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic liposomes, adenovirus core peptide mu (mu) and plasmid DNA
descriptionLiposome:mu:DNA (LMD) is a ternary nucleic acid delivery system built around the mu (mu) peptide associated with the condensed core complex of the adenovirus. LMD is prepared by precondensing plasmid DNA (D) with mu peptide (M) in a 1:0.6 (w/w) ratio and then combining these mu:DNA (MD) complexes with extruded cationic liposomes (L) resulting in a final lipid:mu:DNA ratio of 12:0.6:1 (w/w/w). Correct buffer conditions, reagent concentrations and rates of mixing are all crucial to success. However, once optimal conditions are established, homogeneous LMD particles (120 plus or minus 30 nm) will result that each appear to comprise an MD particle encapsulated within a cationic bilammellar liposome. LMD particles can be formulated reproducibly, they are amenable to long-term storage (>1 month) at -80 degree C and are stable to aggregation at a plasmid DNA concentration up to 5 mg/ml (15 mM nucleotide concentration). Furthermore, LMD transfections are significantly more time and dose efficient in vitro than cationic liposome-plasmid DNA (LD) transfections. Transfection times as short as 10 min and plasmid DNA doses as low as 0.001 mu g/well result in significant gene expression. LMD transfections will also take place in the presence of biological fluids (eg up to 100% serum) giving 15-25% the level of gene expression observed in the absence of serum. Results from confocal microscopy experiments using fluorescent-labelled LMD particles suggest that endocytosis is not a significant barrier to LMD transfection, although the nuclear membrane still is. We also confirm that topical lung transfection in vivo by LMD is at least equal in absolute terms with transfection mediated by GL-67:DOPE:DMPE-PEG sub(5)000 (1:2:0.05 m/m/m), an accepted `gold-standard' non-viral vector system for topical lung transfection, and is in fact at least six-fold more dose efficient. All these features make LMD an important new non-viral vector platform system from which to derive tailor-made non-viral delivery systems by a process of systematic modular upgrading.
subject
0Transformation
1Gene Therapy Vectors
2Miscellaneous, Reviews
3Genetic Engineering in Medicine
4N 14674
5W3 33181
6W 30965
7W4 120
general
0English
110.1038/sj/gt/3301686
2Engineering Research Database
3Technology Research Database
4ProQuest Biological Science Collection
5ProQuest Engineering Collection
6ProQuest Environmental Science Collection
7ProQuest Natural Science Collection
8ProQuest Technology Collection
9ProQuest SciTech Collection
10Agricultural & Environmental Science Database
11Biological Science Database
12Materials Science & Engineering Database
13Natural Science Collection
14SciTech Premium Collection
15Technology Collection
sourceidproquest
recordidproquest18388865
issn
009697128
10969-7128
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2002
addtitleGene Therapy
searchscope
01007443
11007538
21007944
310000004
410000005
510000013
610000015
710000022
810000038
910000041
1010000043
1110000050
1210000053
1310000120
1410000198
1510000209
1610000217
1710000234
1810000238
1910000250
2010000253
2110000260
2210000265
23proquest
scope
01007443
11007538
21007944
310000004
410000005
510000013
610000015
710000022
810000038
910000041
1010000043
1110000050
1210000053
1310000120
1410000198
1510000209
1610000217
1710000234
1810000238
1910000250
2010000253
2110000260
2210000265
23proquest
lsr43
01007443false
11007538false
21007944false
310000004false
410000005false
510000013false
610000015false
710000022false
810000038false
910000041false
1010000043false
1110000050false
1210000053false
1310000120false
1410000198false
1510000209false
1610000217false
1710000234false
1810000238false
1910000250false
2010000253false
2110000260false
2210000265false
contributorTagawa, T
startdate20020501
enddate20020501
citationpf 564 pt 576 vol 9 issue 9
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, doi, eissn]
sort
titleCharacterisation of LMD virus-like nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic liposomes, adenovirus core peptide mu (mu) and plasmid DNA
authorTagawa, T ; Manvell, M ; Brown, N ; Keller, M ; Perouzel, E ; Murray, K ; Harbottle, R ; Tecle, M ; Booy, F ; Brahimi-Horn, M ; Coutelle, C ; Lemoine, N ; Alton, Ewfw ; Miller, AD
creationdate20020501
lso0120020501
facets
frbrgroupid3994966068475342329
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2002
topic
0Transformation
1Gene Therapy Vectors
2Miscellaneous, Reviews
3Genetic Engineering in Medicine
collection
0Engineering Research Database
1Technology Research Database
2ProQuest Biological Science Collection
3ProQuest Engineering Collection
4ProQuest Environmental Science Collection
5ProQuest Natural Science Collection
6ProQuest Technology Collection
7ProQuest SciTech Collection
8Agricultural & Environmental Science Database
9Biological Science Database
10Materials Science & Engineering Database
11Natural Science Collection
12SciTech Premium Collection
13Technology Collection
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Tagawa, T
1Manvell, M
2Brown, N
3Keller, M
4Perouzel, E
5Murray, K
6Harbottle, R
7Tecle, M
8Booy, F
9Brahimi-Horn, M
10Coutelle, C
11Lemoine, N
12Alton, Ewfw
13Miller, AD
jtitleGene Therapy
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Tagawa
1Manvell
2Brown
3Keller
4Perouzel
5Murray
6Harbottle
7Tecle
8Booy
9Brahimi-Horn
10Coutelle
11Lemoine
12Alton
13Miller
aufirst
0T
1M
2N
3E
4K
5R
6F
7C
8EWFW
9AD
au
0Tagawa, T
1Manvell, M
2Brown, N
3Keller, M
4Perouzel, E
5Murray, K
6Harbottle, R
7Tecle, M
8Booy, F
9Brahimi-Horn, M
10Coutelle, C
11Lemoine, N
12Alton, Ewfw
13Miller, AD
addauTagawa, T
atitleCharacterisation of LMD virus-like nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic liposomes, adenovirus core peptide mu (mu) and plasmid DNA
jtitleGene Therapy
risdate20020501
volume9
issue9
spage564
epage576
pages564-576
issn0969-7128
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractLiposome:mu:DNA (LMD) is a ternary nucleic acid delivery system built around the mu (mu) peptide associated with the condensed core complex of the adenovirus. LMD is prepared by precondensing plasmid DNA (D) with mu peptide (M) in a 1:0.6 (w/w) ratio and then combining these mu:DNA (MD) complexes with extruded cationic liposomes (L) resulting in a final lipid:mu:DNA ratio of 12:0.6:1 (w/w/w). Correct buffer conditions, reagent concentrations and rates of mixing are all crucial to success. However, once optimal conditions are established, homogeneous LMD particles (120 plus or minus 30 nm) will result that each appear to comprise an MD particle encapsulated within a cationic bilammellar liposome. LMD particles can be formulated reproducibly, they are amenable to long-term storage (>1 month) at -80 degree C and are stable to aggregation at a plasmid DNA concentration up to 5 mg/ml (15 mM nucleotide concentration). Furthermore, LMD transfections are significantly more time and dose efficient in vitro than cationic liposome-plasmid DNA (LD) transfections. Transfection times as short as 10 min and plasmid DNA doses as low as 0.001 mu g/well result in significant gene expression. LMD transfections will also take place in the presence of biological fluids (eg up to 100% serum) giving 15-25% the level of gene expression observed in the absence of serum. Results from confocal microscopy experiments using fluorescent-labelled LMD particles suggest that endocytosis is not a significant barrier to LMD transfection, although the nuclear membrane still is. We also confirm that topical lung transfection in vivo by LMD is at least equal in absolute terms with transfection mediated by GL-67:DOPE:DMPE-PEG sub(5)000 (1:2:0.05 m/m/m), an accepted `gold-standard' non-viral vector system for topical lung transfection, and is in fact at least six-fold more dose efficient. All these features make LMD an important new non-viral vector platform system from which to derive tailor-made non-viral delivery systems by a process of systematic modular upgrading.
doi10.1038/sj.gt.3301686
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/18388865/
eissn14765462
date2002-05-01