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Cope's rule in the evolution of marine animals

Getting bigger all the timeIn today's world, many animal species are large, with even larger species only recently extinct, but the first animals to evolve were tiny. Was this increase in size due to active selection or to some more random process? Heim et al. test the classic hypothesis known as Co... Full description

Journal Title: Science February 20, 2015, Vol.347(6224), pp.867-870
Main Author: Heim, Noel
Other Authors: Knope, Matthew , Schaal, Ellen , Wang, Steve , Payne, Jonathan
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0036-8075 ; DOI: 10.1126/science.1260065
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1904224890/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Cope's rule in the evolution of marine animals
format: Article
creator:
  • Heim, Noel
  • Knope, Matthew
  • Schaal, Ellen
  • Wang, Steve
  • Payne, Jonathan
subjects:
  • Biological Evolution
  • Animals
  • Mathematical Models
  • Drift
  • Random Processes
  • Marine Animals
  • Populations
  • Evolution
  • Miscellaneous Sciences (So)
  • (An)
ispartof: Science, February 20, 2015, Vol.347(6224), pp.867-870
description: Getting bigger all the timeIn today's world, many animal species are large, with even larger species only recently extinct, but the first animals to evolve were tiny. Was this increase in size due to active selection or to some more random process? Heim et al. test the classic hypothesis known as Cope's rule, which posits that there is selection for increasing body size. They analyzed a data set that spans over 500 million years and includes more than 17,000 marine animal species. In support of Cope's rule, body volumes have increased by over five orders of magnitude since the first animals evolved. Furthermore, modeling suggests that such a massive increase could not have emerged from a random process.Science, this issue p. 867 Cope's rule proposes that animal lineages evolve toward larger body size over time. To test this hypothesis across all marine animals, we compiled a data set of body sizes for 17,208 genera of marine animals spanning the...
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0036-8075 ; DOI: 10.1126/science.1260065
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 00368075
  • 0036-8075
url: Link


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titleCope's rule in the evolution of marine animals
creatorHeim, Noel ; Knope, Matthew ; Schaal, Ellen ; Wang, Steve ; Payne, Jonathan
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ispartofScience, February 20, 2015, Vol.347(6224), pp.867-870
identifierISSN: 0036-8075 ; DOI: 10.1126/science.1260065
subjectBiological Evolution ; Animals ; Mathematical Models ; Drift ; Random Processes ; Marine Animals ; Populations ; Evolution ; Miscellaneous Sciences (So) ; (An)
descriptionGetting bigger all the timeIn today's world, many animal species are large, with even larger species only recently extinct, but the first animals to evolve were tiny. Was this increase in size due to active selection or to some more random process? Heim et al. test the classic hypothesis known as Cope's rule, which posits that there is selection for increasing body size. They analyzed a data set that spans over 500 million years and includes more than 17,000 marine animal species. In support of Cope's rule, body volumes have increased by over five orders of magnitude since the first animals evolved. Furthermore, modeling suggests that such a massive increase could not have emerged from a random process.Science, this issue p. 867 Cope's rule proposes that animal lineages evolve toward larger body size over time. To test this hypothesis across all marine animals, we compiled a data set of body sizes for 17,208 genera of marine animals spanning the...
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abstractGetting bigger all the timeIn today's world, many animal species are large, with even larger species only recently extinct, but the first animals to evolve were tiny. Was this increase in size due to active selection or to some more random process? Heim et al. test the classic hypothesis known as Cope's rule, which posits that there is selection for increasing body size. They analyzed a data set that spans over 500 million years and includes more than 17,000 marine animal species. In support of Cope's rule, body volumes have increased by over five orders of magnitude since the first animals evolved. Furthermore, modeling suggests that such a massive increase could not have emerged from a random process.Science, this issue p. 867 Cope's rule proposes that animal lineages evolve toward larger body size over time. To test this hypothesis across all marine animals, we compiled a data set of body sizes for 17,208 genera of marine animals spanning the...
doi10.1126/science.1260065
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date2015-02-20