schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence: a report of an interrupted time series trial of feedback in home care

Background There is substantial evidence about the effectiveness of audit with feedback, but none that we know have been conducted in home care settings. The primary purpose of the Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence - Home Care (DICE-HC) project was to evaluate the effects of an audit and... Full description

Journal Title: Implementation Science 2017, Vol.12
Main Author: Fraser, Kimberly
Other Authors: Sales, Anne , Schalm, Corinne , Miklavcic, John
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: DOI: 10.1186/s13012-017-0600-1
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: proquest1905601988
title: Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence: a report of an interrupted time series trial of feedback in home care
format: Article
creator:
  • Fraser, Kimberly
  • Sales, Anne
  • Schalm, Corinne
  • Miklavcic, John
subjects:
  • Ontario Canada
  • Long Term Health Care
  • Health Care Policy
  • Professional Practice
  • Intervention
  • Nursing Care
  • Hospitals
  • Health Promotion
  • Audits
  • Time Series
  • Canada Health Act
  • Feedback
  • Quality
  • Nurses
  • Audit With Feedback Intervention
  • Interrupted Time Series
  • Home Care
  • Quality Improvement
  • Process Evaluation
ispartof: Implementation Science, 2017, Vol.12
description: Background There is substantial evidence about the effectiveness of audit with feedback, but none that we know have been conducted in home care settings. The primary purpose of the Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence - Home Care (DICE-HC) project was to evaluate the effects of an audit and feedback delivered to care providers on home care client outcomes. The objective of this paper is to report the effects of feedback on four specific quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospital visits. Methods A 10-month audit with feedback intervention study was conducted with care providers in seven home care offices in Alberta, Canada, which involved delivery of four quarterly feedback reports consisting of data derived from the Resident Assessment Instrument - Home Care (RAI-HC). The primary evaluation employed an interrupted time series design using segmented regression analysis to assess the effects of feedback reporting on the four quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospitalization. Changes in level and trend of the quality indicators were measured before, during, and after the implementation of feedback reports. Pressure ulcer reporting was analyzed as a comparator condition not included in the feedback report. Care providers were surveyed on responses to feedback reporting which informed a process evaluation. Results At initiation of feedback report implementation, the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls significantly increased. Though the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls tended to increase and reporting of delirium and hospital visits tended to decrease relative to the pre-intervention period, there was no significant effect of feedback reporting on quality indicators during the 10-month intervention. The percentage of clients reporting falls, delirium, and hospital visits significantly increased in the 6-month period following feedback reporting relative to the intervention period. About 50% of the care providers that read and understand the feedback reports found the reports useful to make changes to the way clients are cared for. Conclusions Routinely collected data used over time for feedback is feasible in home care settings. A high proportion of care providers find feedback reports useful for informing how they care for clients. Since reporting on the frequency of quality indicators increased in the post-intervention period, this study suggests that ongoing use of audit with feedback to enhance heal
language: eng
source:
identifier: DOI: 10.1186/s13012-017-0600-1
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
url: Link


@attributes
ID631559440
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid1905601988
sourceidproquest
recordidTN_proquest1905601988
sourcesystemOther
pqid1905601988
display
typearticle
titleData for Improvement and Clinical Excellence: a report of an interrupted time series trial of feedback in home care
creatorFraser, Kimberly ; Sales, Anne ; Schalm, Corinne ; Miklavcic, John
ispartofImplementation Science, 2017, Vol.12
identifierDOI: 10.1186/s13012-017-0600-1
subjectOntario Canada ; Long Term Health Care ; Health Care Policy ; Professional Practice ; Intervention ; Nursing Care ; Hospitals ; Health Promotion ; Audits ; Time Series ; Canada Health Act ; Feedback ; Quality ; Nurses ; Audit With Feedback Intervention ; Interrupted Time Series ; Home Care ; Quality Improvement ; Process Evaluation
descriptionBackground There is substantial evidence about the effectiveness of audit with feedback, but none that we know have been conducted in home care settings. The primary purpose of the Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence - Home Care (DICE-HC) project was to evaluate the effects of an audit and feedback delivered to care providers on home care client outcomes. The objective of this paper is to report the effects of feedback on four specific quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospital visits. Methods A 10-month audit with feedback intervention study was conducted with care providers in seven home care offices in Alberta, Canada, which involved delivery of four quarterly feedback reports consisting of data derived from the Resident Assessment Instrument - Home Care (RAI-HC). The primary evaluation employed an interrupted time series design using segmented regression analysis to assess the effects of feedback reporting on the four quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospitalization. Changes in level and trend of the quality indicators were measured before, during, and after the implementation of feedback reports. Pressure ulcer reporting was analyzed as a comparator condition not included in the feedback report. Care providers were surveyed on responses to feedback reporting which informed a process evaluation. Results At initiation of feedback report implementation, the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls significantly increased. Though the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls tended to increase and reporting of delirium and hospital visits tended to decrease relative to the pre-intervention period, there was no significant effect of feedback reporting on quality indicators during the 10-month intervention. The percentage of clients reporting falls, delirium, and hospital visits significantly increased in the 6-month period following feedback reporting relative to the intervention period. About 50% of the care providers that read and understand the feedback reports found the reports useful to make changes to the way clients are cared for. Conclusions Routinely collected data used over time for feedback is feasible in home care settings. A high proportion of care providers find feedback reports useful for informing how they care for clients. Since reporting on the frequency of quality indicators increased in the post-intervention period, this study suggests that ongoing use of audit with feedback to enhance health outcomes in home care may promote improved reporting on standardized instruments.
languageeng
source
version4
oafree_for_read
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
linktorsrc$$Uhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1905601988/?pq-origsite=primo$$EView_record_in_ProQuest_(subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontrib
0Fraser, Kimberly
1Sales, Anne
2Schalm, Corinne
3Miklavcic, John
titleData for Improvement and Clinical Excellence: a report of an interrupted time series trial of feedback in home care
descriptionBackground There is substantial evidence about the effectiveness of audit with feedback, but none that we know have been conducted in home care settings. The primary purpose of the Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence - Home Care (DICE-HC) project was to evaluate the effects of an audit and feedback delivered to care providers on home care client outcomes. The objective of this paper is to report the effects of feedback on four specific quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospital visits. Methods A 10-month audit with feedback intervention study was conducted with care providers in seven home care offices in Alberta, Canada, which involved delivery of four quarterly feedback reports consisting of data derived from the Resident Assessment Instrument - Home Care (RAI-HC). The primary evaluation employed an interrupted time series design using segmented regression analysis to assess the effects of feedback reporting on the four quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospitalization. Changes in level and trend of the quality indicators were measured before, during, and after the implementation of feedback reports. Pressure ulcer reporting was analyzed as a comparator condition not included in the feedback report. Care providers were surveyed on responses to feedback reporting which informed a process evaluation. Results At initiation of feedback report implementation, the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls significantly increased. Though the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls tended to increase and reporting of delirium and hospital visits tended to decrease relative to the pre-intervention period, there was no significant effect of feedback reporting on quality indicators during the 10-month intervention. The percentage of clients reporting falls, delirium, and hospital visits significantly increased in the 6-month period following feedback reporting relative to the intervention period. About 50% of the care providers that read and understand the feedback reports found the reports useful to make changes to the way clients are cared for. Conclusions Routinely collected data used over time for feedback is feasible in home care settings. A high proportion of care providers find feedback reports useful for informing how they care for clients. Since reporting on the frequency of quality indicators increased in the post-intervention period, this study suggests that ongoing use of audit with feedback to enhance health outcomes in home care may promote improved reporting on standardized instruments.
subject
0Ontario Canada
1Long Term Health Care
2Health Care Policy
3Professional Practice
4Intervention
5Nursing Care
6Hospitals
7Health Promotion
8Audits
9Time Series
10Canada Health Act
11Feedback
12Quality
13Nurses
14Audit With Feedback Intervention
15Interrupted Time Series
16Home Care
17Quality Improvement
18Process Evaluation
19Audit with feedback intervention
20Interrupted time series
21Home care
22Quality improvement
23Process evaluation
general
0English
1BioMed Central
210.1186/s13012-017-0600-1
3Medical Database
4Health & Medical Collection (Alumni edition)
5Medical Database (Alumni edition)
6Health & Medical Collection
7Publicly Available Content Database
8ProQuest Central
9ProQuest Hospital Collection
10Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
11ProQuest Health & Medical Complete
12ProQuest Medical Library
13ProQuest Central (new)
14ProQuest Central Korea
15Health Research Premium Collection
16Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
17ProQuest Central Essentials
18ProQuest Central China
sourceidproquest
recordidproquest1905601988
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2017
addtitleImplementation Science
searchscope
01000273
11006761
21006762
31007067
41007945
51008886
61009127
71009240
81009386
910000039
1010000047
1110000118
1210000119
1310000155
1410000156
1510000157
1610000158
1710000255
1810000256
1910000258
2010000270
2110000271
2210000281
2310000300
2410000302
25proquest
scope
01000273
11006761
21006762
31007067
41007945
51008886
61009127
71009240
81009386
910000039
1010000047
1110000118
1210000119
1310000155
1410000156
1510000157
1610000158
1710000255
1810000256
1910000258
2010000270
2110000271
2210000281
2310000300
2410000302
25proquest
lsr43
01000273true
11006761true
21006762true
31007067true
41007945true
51008886true
61009127true
71009240true
81009386true
910000039true
1010000047true
1110000118true
1210000119true
1310000155true
1410000156true
1510000157true
1610000158true
1710000255true
1810000256true
1910000258true
2010000270true
2110000271true
2210000281true
2310000300true
2410000302true
startdate20170101
enddate20170101
citationvol 12
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[issue, issn, pqid, pages, eissn]
sort
titleData for Improvement and Clinical Excellence: a report of an interrupted time series trial of feedback in home care
authorFraser, Kimberly ; Sales, Anne ; Schalm, Corinne ; Miklavcic, John
creationdate20170101
lso0120170101
facets
frbrgroupid-5437864580445025134
frbrtype5
newrecords20170608
languageeng
creationdate2017
topic
0Ontario Canada
1Long Term Health Care
2Health Care Policy
3Professional Practice
4Intervention
5Nursing Care
6Hospitals
7Health Promotion
8Audits
9Time Series
10Canada Health Act
11Feedback
12Quality
13Nurses
14Audit With Feedback Intervention
15Interrupted Time Series
16Home Care
17Quality Improvement
18Process Evaluation
collection
0Medical Database
1Health & Medical Collection (Alumni edition)
2Medical Database (Alumni edition)
3Health & Medical Collection
4Publicly Available Content Database
5ProQuest Central
6ProQuest Hospital Collection
7Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
8ProQuest Health & Medical Complete
9ProQuest Medical Library
10ProQuest Central (new)
11ProQuest Central Korea
12Health Research Premium Collection
13Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
14ProQuest Central Essentials
15ProQuest Central China
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Fraser, Kimberly
1Sales, Anne
2Schalm, Corinne
3Miklavcic, John
jtitleImplementation Science
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext_linktorsrc
addata
aulast
0Fraser
1Sales
2Schalm
3Miklavcic
aufirst
0Kimberly
1Anne
2Corinne
3John
au
0Fraser, Kimberly
1Sales, Anne
2Schalm, Corinne
3Miklavcic, John
atitleData for Improvement and Clinical Excellence: a report of an interrupted time series trial of feedback in home care
jtitleImplementation Science
risdate20170101
volume12
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractBackground There is substantial evidence about the effectiveness of audit with feedback, but none that we know have been conducted in home care settings. The primary purpose of the Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence - Home Care (DICE-HC) project was to evaluate the effects of an audit and feedback delivered to care providers on home care client outcomes. The objective of this paper is to report the effects of feedback on four specific quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospital visits. Methods A 10-month audit with feedback intervention study was conducted with care providers in seven home care offices in Alberta, Canada, which involved delivery of four quarterly feedback reports consisting of data derived from the Resident Assessment Instrument - Home Care (RAI-HC). The primary evaluation employed an interrupted time series design using segmented regression analysis to assess the effects of feedback reporting on the four quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospitalization. Changes in level and trend of the quality indicators were measured before, during, and after the implementation of feedback reports. Pressure ulcer reporting was analyzed as a comparator condition not included in the feedback report. Care providers were surveyed on responses to feedback reporting which informed a process evaluation. Results At initiation of feedback report implementation, the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls significantly increased. Though the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls tended to increase and reporting of delirium and hospital visits tended to decrease relative to the pre-intervention period, there was no significant effect of feedback reporting on quality indicators during the 10-month intervention. The percentage of clients reporting falls, delirium, and hospital visits significantly increased in the 6-month period following feedback reporting relative to the intervention period. About 50% of the care providers that read and understand the feedback reports found the reports useful to make changes to the way clients are cared for. Conclusions Routinely collected data used over time for feedback is feasible in home care settings. A high proportion of care providers find feedback reports useful for informing how they care for clients. Since reporting on the frequency of quality indicators increased in the post-intervention period, this study suggests that ongoing use of audit with feedback to enhance health outcomes in home care may promote improved reporting on standardized instruments.
copLondon
pubBioMed Central
doi10.1186/s13012-017-0600-1
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1905601988/
issue1
pages1-10
issn17485908
eissn17485908
oafree_for_read
date2017-01-01