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Feeding premature neonates: Kinship and species in translational neonatology

Kinship, understood as biogenetic proximity, between a chosen animal model and a human patient counterpart, is considered essential to the process of `translating' research from the experimental animal laboratory to the human clinic. In the Danish research centre, NEOMUNE, premature piglets are fed... Full description

Journal Title: Social Science & Medicine Apr 2017, Vol.179, p.129
Main Author: Dam, Mie
Other Authors: Juhl, Sandra , Sangild, Per , Svendsen, Mette
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved
ID: ISSN: 02779536 ; E-ISSN: 18735347
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1912955165/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Feeding premature neonates: Kinship and species in translational neonatology
format: Article
creator:
  • Dam, Mie
  • Juhl, Sandra
  • Sangild, Per
  • Svendsen, Mette
subjects:
  • Research
  • Laboratories
  • Researchers
  • Kinship
  • Mothers
  • Housing
  • Infants
  • Premature Infants
  • Diet
  • Threat
  • Hogs
  • Parents & Parenting
  • Illness & Health Care
  • Culture and Social Structure
  • Culture (Kinship, Forms of Social Organization, Social Cohesion & Integration, & Social Representations)
  • Sociology of Health and Medicine
  • Sociology of Medicine & Health Care
ispartof: Social Science & Medicine, Apr 2017, Vol.179, p.129
description: Kinship, understood as biogenetic proximity, between a chosen animal model and a human patient counterpart, is considered essential to the process of `translating' research from the experimental animal laboratory to the human clinic. In the Danish research centre, NEOMUNE, premature piglets are fed a novel milk diet (bovine colostrum) to model the effects of this new diet in premature infants. Our ethnographic fieldwork in an experimental pig laboratory and a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 2013-2014 shows that regardless of biogenetics, daily practices of feeding, housing, and clinical care hold the potential for stimulating and eroding kinship relations between human and nonhuman actors. In the laboratory, piglets and researchers form interspecies-milk-kinships' that entail the intimate care crucial to keeping the compromised piglets alive during the experiments, thereby enhancing what the researchers refer to as the translatability' of the results. In the NICU, parents of premature infants likewise imagine a kind of interspecies kinship when presented with the option to supplement mother's own milk with bovine colostrum for the first weeks after birth. However, in this setting the NICU parents may perceive the animality of bovine colostrum, and the background information obtained in piglets, as a threat to the infants' connection to their biological parents as well as the larger human collective. Our study argues that the `species flexibility' of premature beings profoundly shapes the translational processes in the field of neonatology research.
language: eng
source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved
identifier: ISSN: 02779536 ; E-ISSN: 18735347
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 02779536
  • 0277-9536
  • 18735347
  • 1873-5347
url: Link


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titleFeeding premature neonates: Kinship and species in translational neonatology
creatorDam, Mie ; Juhl, Sandra ; Sangild, Per ; Svendsen, Mette
ispartofSocial Science & Medicine, Apr 2017, Vol.179, p.129
identifierISSN: 02779536 ; E-ISSN: 18735347
subjectResearch ; Laboratories ; Researchers ; Kinship ; Mothers ; Housing ; Infants ; Premature Infants ; Diet ; Threat ; Hogs ; Parents & Parenting ; Illness & Health Care ; Culture and Social Structure; Culture (Kinship, Forms of Social Organization, Social Cohesion & Integration, & Social Representations) ; Sociology of Health and Medicine; Sociology of Medicine & Health Care
descriptionKinship, understood as biogenetic proximity, between a chosen animal model and a human patient counterpart, is considered essential to the process of `translating' research from the experimental animal laboratory to the human clinic. In the Danish research centre, NEOMUNE, premature piglets are fed a novel milk diet (bovine colostrum) to model the effects of this new diet in premature infants. Our ethnographic fieldwork in an experimental pig laboratory and a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 2013-2014 shows that regardless of biogenetics, daily practices of feeding, housing, and clinical care hold the potential for stimulating and eroding kinship relations between human and nonhuman actors. In the laboratory, piglets and researchers form interspecies-milk-kinships' that entail the intimate care crucial to keeping the compromised piglets alive during the experiments, thereby enhancing what the researchers refer to as the translatability' of the results. In the NICU, parents of premature infants likewise imagine a kind of interspecies kinship when presented with the option to supplement mother's own milk with bovine colostrum for the first weeks after birth. However, in this setting the NICU parents may perceive the animality of bovine colostrum, and the background information obtained in piglets, as a threat to the infants' connection to their biological parents as well as the larger human collective. Our study argues that the `species flexibility' of premature beings profoundly shapes the translational processes in the field of neonatology research.
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titleFeeding premature neonates: Kinship and species in translational neonatology
authorDam, Mie ; Juhl, Sandra ; Sangild, Per ; Svendsen, Mette
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abstractKinship, understood as biogenetic proximity, between a chosen animal model and a human patient counterpart, is considered essential to the process of `translating' research from the experimental animal laboratory to the human clinic. In the Danish research centre, NEOMUNE, premature piglets are fed a novel milk diet (bovine colostrum) to model the effects of this new diet in premature infants. Our ethnographic fieldwork in an experimental pig laboratory and a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 2013-2014 shows that regardless of biogenetics, daily practices of feeding, housing, and clinical care hold the potential for stimulating and eroding kinship relations between human and nonhuman actors. In the laboratory, piglets and researchers form interspecies-milk-kinships' that entail the intimate care crucial to keeping the compromised piglets alive during the experiments, thereby enhancing what the researchers refer to as the translatability' of the results. In the NICU, parents of premature infants likewise imagine a kind of interspecies kinship when presented with the option to supplement mother's own milk with bovine colostrum for the first weeks after birth. However, in this setting the NICU parents may perceive the animality of bovine colostrum, and the background information obtained in piglets, as a threat to the infants' connection to their biological parents as well as the larger human collective. Our study argues that the `species flexibility' of premature beings profoundly shapes the translational processes in the field of neonatology research.
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date2017-04-01