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Association of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.

BACKGROUNDFew studies have evaluated the relationship between changes in diet quality over time and the risk of death. METHODSWe used Cox proportional-hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios for total and cause-specific mortality among 47,994 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 25,745 m... Full description

Journal Title: The New England journal of medicine July 13, 2017, Vol.377(2), pp.143-153
Main Author: Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes
Other Authors: Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N , Mattei, Josiemer , Fung, Teresa T , Li, Yanping , Pan, An , Willett, Walter C , Rimm, Eric B , Hu, Frank B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1533-4406 ; DOI: 1533-4406 ; DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1613502
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1918846630/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Association of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.
format: Article
creator:
  • Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes
  • Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N
  • Mattei, Josiemer
  • Fung, Teresa T
  • Li, Yanping
  • Pan, An
  • Willett, Walter C
  • Rimm, Eric B
  • Hu, Frank B
subjects:
  • Adult–Mortality
  • Aged–Mortality
  • Cause of Death–Mortality
  • Diet–Mortality
  • Female–Mortality
  • Follow-Up Studies–Mortality
  • Healthy Diet–Mortality
  • Humans–Mortality
  • Male–Mortality
  • Middle Aged–Mortality
  • Multivariate Analysis–Mortality
  • Proportional Hazards Models–Mortality
  • Risk–Mortality
  • Abridged
ispartof: The New England journal of medicine, July 13, 2017, Vol.377(2), pp.143-153
description: BACKGROUNDFew studies have evaluated the relationship between changes in diet quality over time and the risk of death. METHODSWe used Cox proportional-hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios for total and cause-specific mortality among 47,994 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 25,745 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1998 through 2010. Changes in diet quality over the preceding 12 years (1986-1998) were assessed with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 score, the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score. RESULTSThe pooled hazard ratios for all-cause mortality among participants who had the greatest improvement in diet quality (13 to 33% improvement), as compared with those who had a relatively stable diet quality (0 to 3% improvement), in the 12-year period were the following: 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 0.97) according to changes in the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 0.84 (95 CI%, 0.78 to 0.91) according to changes in the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.84 to 0.95) according to changes in the DASH score. A 20-percentile increase in diet scores (indicating an improved quality of diet) was significantly associated with a reduction in total mortality of 8 to 17% with the use of the three diet indexes and a 7 to 15% reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index and Alternate Mediterranean Diet. Among participants who maintained a high-quality diet over a 12-year period, the risk of death from any cause was significantly lower - by 14% (95% CI, 8 to 19) when assessed with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 11% (95% CI, 5 to 18) when assessed with the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 9% (95% CI, 2 to 15) when assessed with the DASH score - than the risk among participants with consistently low diet scores over time. CONCLUSIONSImproved diet quality over 12 years was consistently associated with a decreased risk of death. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1533-4406 ; DOI: 1533-4406 ; DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1613502
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 15334406
  • 1533-4406
url: Link


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titleAssociation of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.
creatorSotos-Prieto, Mercedes ; Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N ; Mattei, Josiemer ; Fung, Teresa T ; Li, Yanping ; Pan, An ; Willett, Walter C ; Rimm, Eric B ; Hu, Frank B
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subjectAdult–Mortality ; Aged–Mortality ; Cause of Death–Mortality ; Diet–Mortality ; Female–Mortality ; Follow-Up Studies–Mortality ; Healthy Diet–Mortality ; Humans–Mortality ; Male–Mortality ; Middle Aged–Mortality ; Multivariate Analysis–Mortality ; Proportional Hazards Models–Mortality ; Risk–Mortality ; Abridged
descriptionBACKGROUNDFew studies have evaluated the relationship between changes in diet quality over time and the risk of death. METHODSWe used Cox proportional-hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios for total and cause-specific mortality among 47,994 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 25,745 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1998 through 2010. Changes in diet quality over the preceding 12 years (1986-1998) were assessed with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 score, the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score. RESULTSThe pooled hazard ratios for all-cause mortality among participants who had the greatest improvement in diet quality (13 to 33% improvement), as compared with those who had a relatively stable diet quality (0 to 3% improvement), in the 12-year period were the following: 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 0.97) according to changes in the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 0.84 (95 CI%, 0.78 to 0.91) according to changes in the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.84 to 0.95) according to changes in the DASH score. A 20-percentile increase in diet scores (indicating an improved quality of diet) was significantly associated with a reduction in total mortality of 8 to 17% with the use of the three diet indexes and a 7 to 15% reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index and Alternate Mediterranean Diet. Among participants who maintained a high-quality diet over a 12-year period, the risk of death from any cause was significantly lower - by 14% (95% CI, 8 to 19) when assessed with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 11% (95% CI, 5 to 18) when assessed with the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 9% (95% CI, 2 to 15) when assessed with the DASH score - than the risk among participants with consistently low diet scores over time. CONCLUSIONSImproved diet quality over 12 years was consistently associated with a decreased risk of death. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).
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titleAssociation of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.
descriptionBACKGROUNDFew studies have evaluated the relationship between changes in diet quality over time and the risk of death. METHODSWe used Cox proportional-hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios for total and cause-specific mortality among 47,994 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 25,745 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1998 through 2010. Changes in diet quality over the preceding 12 years (1986-1998) were assessed with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 score, the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score. RESULTSThe pooled hazard ratios for all-cause mortality among participants who had the greatest improvement in diet quality (13 to 33% improvement), as compared with those who had a relatively stable diet quality (0 to 3% improvement), in the 12-year period were the following: 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 0.97) according to changes in the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 0.84 (95 CI%, 0.78 to 0.91) according to changes in the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.84 to 0.95) according to changes in the DASH score. A 20-percentile increase in diet scores (indicating an improved quality of diet) was significantly associated with a reduction in total mortality of 8 to 17% with the use of the three diet indexes and a 7 to 15% reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index and Alternate Mediterranean Diet. Among participants who maintained a high-quality diet over a 12-year period, the risk of death from any cause was significantly lower - by 14% (95% CI, 8 to 19) when assessed with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 11% (95% CI, 5 to 18) when assessed with the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 9% (95% CI, 2 to 15) when assessed with the DASH score - than the risk among participants with consistently low diet scores over time. CONCLUSIONSImproved diet quality over 12 years was consistently associated with a decreased risk of death. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).
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abstractBACKGROUNDFew studies have evaluated the relationship between changes in diet quality over time and the risk of death. METHODSWe used Cox proportional-hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios for total and cause-specific mortality among 47,994 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 25,745 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1998 through 2010. Changes in diet quality over the preceding 12 years (1986-1998) were assessed with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 score, the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score. RESULTSThe pooled hazard ratios for all-cause mortality among participants who had the greatest improvement in diet quality (13 to 33% improvement), as compared with those who had a relatively stable diet quality (0 to 3% improvement), in the 12-year period were the following: 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 0.97) according to changes in the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 0.84 (95 CI%, 0.78 to 0.91) according to changes in the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.84 to 0.95) according to changes in the DASH score. A 20-percentile increase in diet scores (indicating an improved quality of diet) was significantly associated with a reduction in total mortality of 8 to 17% with the use of the three diet indexes and a 7 to 15% reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index and Alternate Mediterranean Diet. Among participants who maintained a high-quality diet over a 12-year period, the risk of death from any cause was significantly lower - by 14% (95% CI, 8 to 19) when assessed with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 11% (95% CI, 5 to 18) when assessed with the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 9% (95% CI, 2 to 15) when assessed with the DASH score - than the risk among participants with consistently low diet scores over time. CONCLUSIONSImproved diet quality over 12 years was consistently associated with a decreased risk of death. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).
doi10.1056/NEJMoa1613502
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1918846630/
issn00284793
date2017-07-13